Tag Archives: history

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

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Conference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 November 2017

san-giacomo-dall-orioConference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 Nov 2017, Ca’ Foscari University, Venice, November 9 – 10, 2017

“La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio: una trama millenaria di arte e fede” (Chiese di Venezia, Nuove prospettive di ricerca, 6), cur. by Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini and Deborah Howard

Like every Venetian parish church, the evolution of San Giacomo dall’Orio has been closely interconnected with the development of the surrounding area. Its free-standing site, however, remains unusual, shared only by the church of Santa Maria Formosa; like the latter, its facade addresses the canal while the apses project into the campo.
Over the centuries the parish became progressively marginalised: the area within the original parish boundaries is now landlocked, with access to the Grand Canal only possible by means of a network of small canals.  The availability of land and the spread of modest, functional housing blocks for artisans and workers — combined with the distance from the centre (which became dominated by the San Marco-Rialto axis) — led to the development of the area around San Giacomo dall’Orio as an industrial zone, dedicated in particular to wool manufacture.
Although the area became primarily a popular quarter, it still preserves several palaces erected by noble families, among them that of the diarist Marin Sanudo.  In addition, the city’s first anatomy theatre was located in the present Corte dell’Anatomia, while in 1671, thanks to an initiative of the Loredan family, the College of Surgeons was founded on the south side of the church.
This conference, therefore, aims to address the more general social and urban characteristics of the parish, and to contextualise the church within the varied daily life of the campo.  This space hosted a range of activities: ludic (remaining unpaved until the eighteenth century, it was used as a football field, even by players from noble families); religious (it was the scene of numerous confraternity processions); and socio-economic (including the practice of crafts).
The church of San Giacomo dall’Orio was probably founded towards the end of the tenth century, even if its documented status as a parish only dates back to 1130.  Rebuilt in 1225, the church acquired its main elements thanks to radical restorations after the earthquake of 1345: the aisled transepts and the present ship’s-keel roof probably date from this time.
Between the end of the Quattrocento and the mid Cinquecento the church was subject to various renovations in the presbytery, nave and aisles, leading to its present configuration.  In particular, following the removal of the rood screen at the entrance to the presbytery, the stalls were transferred to the apse.  The organ was relocated to a wooden organ loft over the main entrance portal — one of the oldest surviving examples of this arrangement.
After the mid Cinquecento, various alterations mainly concerned the interior, which houses works by such celebrated artists as Veronese and Palma Giovane.  Moreover, the parish became the setting for the altars and ritual activities of numerous confraternities, including the important Scuola del Sacramento, whose members came from a wide social range.
Interventions since the middle of the Settecento include the addition of partition walls in the transepts (later removed), the construction of a new sacristy during a programme of structural and decorative repairs at the start of the twentieth century, and, fifty years ago, a complete refurbishment of the presbytery.
Spoils and precious marbles – such as the flecked black marble Ionic column and the unusual polylobed holy water stoop – remained long after these had passed out of fashion.  The beautiful marble pulpit is unique in the city.  At the same time, the almost complete absence of wall-tombs and the relative lack of family chapels serve to underline that this was a popular quarter with few elite families.  One of the most important patrons was the parish priest Giovanni Maria da Ponte, who commissioned a cycle of paintings for the Old Sacristy.  The eucharistic symbol in the centre of the ceiling by Palma il Giovane, not to mention the Sacrament Chapel itself, indicate the growing devotion to the Holy Sacrament.  Even if the apostolic visitations of the late sixteenth-century mention certain deficiencies, the programme of artistic renewal during the Counter Reformation reflects the parish’s serious response to post-Tridentine reforms.
The remarkable spatial and artistic coherence that characterises the whole building is not easily explained by the usual practices of art-historical and architectural analysis.  It is now recognised, of course, that an appreciation of the ceremonial, liturgical and devotional practices, especially those connected with the life and character of the parish, constitute an essential element in the understanding of a sacred building and its many individual details.  The proposed conference therefore seeks to interpret this historic church within its broader historical and geographical context.
The dissemination of knowledge of Venetian churches, to audiences of experts and non-specialists alike, is a characteristic of the conferences organized by the project “Chiese di Venezia. Nuove prospettive di ricerca”. The wide participation of the public (at the sessions and guided tours) in the five conferences organized annually since 2011 has demonstrated the effectiveness of this type of gathering.
Visits to the church will be organised as part of the programme.

Program
9, November
– Ca’ Dolfin, 10.00-13.00
10.00-10.15 Registration
10.15-10.30 Welcome. Martina Frank (Università Ca’ Foscari), Gianmario Guidarelli (Università degli Studi di Padova)
10.30-10.45 Introduction. Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Deborah Howard
Session “Il contesto urbano”, chair: Deborah Howard (University of Cambridge)
10.45-11.15, Michela Agazzi (Università Ca’ Foscari), “San Giacomo dall’Orio, il contesto”

11.15-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.00 Edoardo Demo (Università degli Studi di Verona), “Società e vita industriale”
12.00 -12.30 Jane Stevens Crawshaw (Oxford Brookes University), “Life, death and the Anatomy Theatre in early modern Venice”
12.30-13.00 Discussion
13.00-14.30 Lunch

-Ca’ Dolfin, 14.30-18.15
Session “La vita della parrocchia”, chair Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova)
14.30-15.00 Pascal Vuillemin (Université Savoie Mont Blanc, “Una parrocchia tra due sedi: San Giacomo dall’Orio nel Medioevo (XII-XV secc.)”
15.00-15.45 Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari) and Jean-François Chauvard (Université de Lyon 2), “Appunti sugli stati delle anime a San Giacomo a fine Cinquecento”
15.45-16.15 Discussion
16.15-16.45 Coffee break

16.45-17.15 Francesco Trentini (Università Ca’ Foscari), “L’apostolo, il matamoros, il pellegrino. Le molteplici connotazioni del titolo di San Giacomo dall’Orio (secoli X-XVI)”
17.15-1745 Elena Quaranta(Università Ca’ Foscari), “Musica e musicisti a San Giacomo dall’Orio: un’indagine archivistica”
17.45-18.15 Discussion

novembre, 10th
Ca’ Dolfin, 9.30-12.45
-Session “Conservazione e trasformazione”, chair Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari)
9.30-10.00 Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova), “Il complesso dell’organo: trasformazioni architettoniche e funzionalità liturgica”
10.00-10.30 Adriano Amendola (Università degli Studi di Salerno), “Tra Oriente e Occidente: i marmi policromi della chiesa di San Giacomo dall’Orio”
10.30-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.15 Coffee break

11.15-11.45 Marie-Louise Lillywhite (University of Warwick), “The Decorative Programme after the Council of Trent”
11.45-12.15 Thomas Worthen (Drake University), Altars and other furnishings for the Scuola del SS. Sacramento in San Giacomo dall’Orio
12.15-12.45 Discussion
12.45-15.00 lunch

15.00-17.00 Church of di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Session “in situ”, Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Gianmario Guidarelli, Deborah Howard.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CONF: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio (Venice, 9-10 Nov 17). In: ArtHist.net, Oct 19, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16534>.

Job: Tenure-track Assistant Professor of Late Antique or Medieval History, Department of History, Stony Brook University

856 9802Job: Tenure-track Assistant Professor of Late Antique or Medieval History, Department of History, Stony Brook University
Deadline: 1 December 2017

The Department of History at Stony Brook University invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor of late antique or medieval history. Our search encompasses all fields and areas of medieval European, Mediterranean, and/or Near Eastern history, ca. 200–1400 CE. Preferred qualifications: ability to teach a range of undergraduate lectures and seminars in late antique and/or medieval history; research and teaching interests that relate and can contribute to one or more of our graduate program thematic clusters (Global connections, empire, capitalism; Health, science, environment; Race, citizenship, migration; Religion, gender, cultural identity; States, nations, political cultures).  We also welcome interdisciplinary candidates whose historical work addresses social, cultural, economic, and/or political processes; who engage with material and/or visual cultures; and/or who can participate in Stony Brook’s Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations.

To receive consideration, applications must be received no later than December 1, 2017.

A complete application consists of the following: 1) cover letter, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) teaching statement, 4) research statement, 5) three letters of reference, and 6) a completed State employment application form. The form can be found here: https://www.asa.stonybrook.edu/asa/ASAForms/Department/HRS/Document/HRSF0113

We will begin reviewing files on December 1, with first-round Skype interviews planned for January 2018, and campus visits in February 2018. Inquiries may be directed to Sara Lipton: sara.lipton@stonybrook.edu.

Special Notes: 1) The selected candidate must clear a background investigation. 2) This is a tenure-track position. 3) This FLSA-exempt position is not eligible for the overtime provisions of the FLSA. 4) Stony Brook University is 100% tobacco free as of January 1, 2016; see stonybrook.edu/tobaccofree.

JOB: Lecturer in Byzantine History, Kings College London, UK

kcl_red_logoJOB: Lecturer in Byzantine History, Kings College London, UK:
Deadline: 6th November 2017

The Departments of Classics and History are seeking to appoint a Lecturer in Byzantine History to cover for staff on research leave. The successful candidate will teach over a range of topics (as indicated in the Job Pack) in collaboration with colleagues, assist with the pastoral support of students, and contribute to the research life of the two Departments. They will be helped through mentoring and training to develop their career.

Candidates should specialise in any aspect of Byzantine history and culture. They will have a record of inspiring teaching and a commitment to academic development of the subject and its promotion through public engagement.

The selection process will include a brief presentation and a panel interview, and will be held in the week beginning Monday 20 November 2017.

For informal queries about the role please contact Professor Abigail Woods abigail.woods@kcl.ac.uk Head of the Department of History, or Professor Dominic Rathbone dominic.rathbone@kcl.ac.uk Head of the Department of Classics.

This post will be a Fixed Term Contract for 18 months, starting 1 January 2018.

For further information and application procedure, please click here

Fellowships at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies

220px-villa_i_tatti2c_ext-2c_giardino_05Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy is now accepting fellowship applications for the 2018–2019 academic year.
Deadline: November 15

Wallace Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore the historiography and impact of the Italian Renaissance in the Modern Era (19th–21st centuries).

Berenson Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore “Italy in the World”. Projects should address the transnational dialogues between Italy and other cultures (e.g. Latin American, Mediterranean, African, Asian, etc.) during the Renaissance, broadly understood historically to include the period from the 14th to the 17th century.

Digital Humanities Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for projects that cut across traditional disciplinary boundaries and actively employ digital technology. Applicants can be scholars in the humanities or social sciences, librarians, archivists, and data science professionals. Projects should apply digital technologies such as mapping, textual analysis, visualization, or the semantic web to topics on any aspect of the Italian Renaissance.

Villa I Tatti – Boğaziçi University Joint Fellowship (one year; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral research focusing on the interaction between Italy and the Byzantine Empire (ca. 1300 to ca. 1700). Scholars will spend a semester at Villa I Tatti and a semester at the Byzantine Studies Research Center of Boğaziçi University.

Craig Hugh Smyth Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for curators and conservators. Projects can address any aspect of the Italian Renaissance art or architecture, including landscape architecture.

David and Julie Tobey Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for research on drawings, prints, and illustrated manuscripts from the Italian Renaissance, and especially the role that these works played in the creative process, the history of taste and collecting, and questions of connoisseurship.

For more information on all fellowships at Villa I Tatti please visit http://itatti.harvard.edu/fellowships

European History 1150-1550 Seminars @ IHR: 2017-2018 Programme

800px-1450_c2bf_carta_catalana_jpeg_copy-aEuropean History 1150-1550
Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR, North block, Senate House
Thursdays 17:30

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL), Marie Legendre (SOAS)

 

Autumn Term 2017

Date Seminar details
5 October

17:30

Pretenders and returners: Dynastic imposters in the Middle Ages

Robert Bartlett (University of St Andrews)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

19 October

17:30

Hunting at the court of King John of England

Hugh Thomas (Miami College of Arts and Sciences)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

2 November

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Daisy Livingston (School of Oriental and African Studies), Martin Hall (Royal Holloway University of London)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

16 November

17:30

Trust and authority: Pragmatic literacy and communication in the royal towns of medieval Hungary

Katalin Szende (Central European University)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

30 November

18:00

The Creighton Lecture 2017. Strangers in Medieval Cities

Miri Rubin (Queen Mary University of London)

IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02, Basement, IHR

14 December

17:30

The rise of administrative lordship in medieval Flanders: New perspectives

Jean-François Nieus (University of Namur)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Spring Term 2018

Date Seminar details
11 January

17:30

Trustworthy men: How inequality and faith made the medieval church

Ian Forrest (University of Oxford)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

25 January

17:30

Government and inquests from Philip Augustus to the last Capetians

Marie Dejoux (Pantheon-Sorbonne University Paris1)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 February

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Anaïs Waag (King’s College London), Cecil Reid (Queen Mary University of London)

Room 243, Second Floor

22 February

17:30

Petrifying wealth: The southern European shift to masonry as collective investment in identity, c. 1050-1300

Ana María Rodríguez López (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 March

17:30

Observing Religion: High medieval religious movements and their polemical vocabularies

Sita Steckel (University of Münster)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Job: Assistant Professor of Mediterranean History, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, USA

unit-16474Job: Assistant Professor of Mediterranean History (Tenure Track), Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA., USA.
Deadline: 15th October, 2017

he History Department of Washington and Lee University invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professorship in Mediterranean history, 500-1500 C.E., beginning September 2018. Special consideration will be given to candidates who can situate Mediterranean history in a global context by contributing to the Africana Studies, Middle East and South Asia Studies, and/or Medieval and Renaissance Studies Programs. Candidates whose research focuses on issues such as, but not limited to, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, cross-cultural contact, religious cooperation and conflict, urbanism and/or empire are particularly encouraged to apply. Successful applicants will be expected to teach introductory surveys as well as intermediate and advanced undergraduate courses related to their areas of specialization.

For further information click here.