Tag Archives: Antiquity

Conference: The Right Moment. A Symposium on Kairotic Energies, Brussels, 18-19 October 2018

church-of-the-holy-nativity-631The Greek term kairós expresses an idea of ‘grasping the right moment’, which travelled through art, literature, and philosophy. And even today, it is central to debates over, for example, time management. Combining perspectives from classical reception studies and iconology, this ongoing project at KU Leuven (2017-2021) is about the reception of kairós in the visual medium from antiquity to the Renaissance. How was the notion of kairós visualized in images throughout time, from antiquity to the early modern era? And more specifically, how did text and image work together to transform the notion of kairós in various contexts?

The attending speakers from Belgium, Germany, France, Israel, Croatia, The Netherlands, Romania, The United Kingdom, The United States, and Switzerland have not only been selected on the basis of their interdisciplinary skills in the field; but equally because of their distinctive contribution to the method of iconology and visual anthropology.

Many among them are key influencers on, among other things, the importance of the Humanities in terms of peace process work, ecology, and the relationship between Eastern and Western civilizations.

Barbara Baert – Kunstwetenschappen KU Leuven – www.illuminare.be

PROGRAM

Thursday, 18 October

08.30-09.00 Registration

09.00-09.15 Welcome speech by Pierre Van Moerbeke,
Executive director of Francqui Foundation

09.15-09.30 Welcome speech by Luc Sels, Rector of KU
Leuven

09.30-10.00 Introduction by Barbara Baert

10.00-10.30 Coffee break

Part I
10.30-11.30 Giotto, the Eye and the Gaze – Victor Stoichita
Respondent: Herman Parret

11.30-12.30 Time in the Context of Ecclesia/Synagoga – Miri Rubin
Respondent: Inigo Bocken

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part II
14.00-15.00 Epochal Madness: Notes on the Present Moment – W. J. T. Mitchell
Respondent: Stéphane Symons

15.00-16.00 The Manic Moment – Davide Stimilli
Respondent: Hedwig Schwall

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 The Silence of Lifta – Avinoam Shalem
Respondent: Amr Ryad

17.30-18.15 Presentation of the new series Recollection: Experimental Reflections on Texts, Images and Ideas – Veerle De Laet (Leuven University Press) & Ellen Harlizius-Klück

Friday 19 October

08.30-09.00 Welcome & coffee

Part III
09.00-10.00 The Nativity Church in Bethlehem as Kairotic
Space – Bianca Kühnel
Respondent: Marina Vicelja-Matijašic

10.00-11.00 L’occasion de la grâce dans le martyre – Pierre Antoine Fabre
Respondent: Ralph Dekoninck

11.00-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.30 A Dialogue of Early Buddhism, Hinduism and
Jainism on the Varieties of Auspicious Moments – Eugen Ciurtin
Respondent: Reimund Bieringer

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part IV
14.00-15.00 Generating Synchronicity: Bodily and Affective
Techniques – Elisabeth Hsu
Respondent: Philippe Van Cauteren

15.00-16.00 The Moment of the Dangerous Women – Catherine Harper
Respondent: Ann-Sophie Lehmann

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 Concluding remarks – Han Lamers & Bart Verschaffel

17.30-18.00 Book presentations: Paul Peeters (Peeters Publishers) & Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art

18.00-19.30 Farewell drinks

Contact and registration: stephanie.heremans@kuleuven.be
Registration deadline: 30 September 2018

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The Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminars (Oxford, 18 Jan-8 Mar 18)

byzantineOxford, January 18 – March 8, 2018
Deadline: Mar 8, 2018

The Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar

Hilary Term 2018, weeks 1–8
Thursdays 11–12:30

Ioannou Centre, 66 St Giles’, Oxford
First Floor Seminar Room
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CFP: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM journal

Call for Contributions: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM. Exchanges and Interactions in the Arts of Medieval Europe, Byzantium, and the Mediterranean, special issue edited by Elisabetta Scirocco (Bibliotheca Hertziana – MPI) and Gerhard Wolf (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – MPI), published March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 20 September 2017
Deadline for article submission: 30 November 2017

tavola_strozzi_-_napoli
This thematic issue of the journal Convivium is dedicated to the Italian South from the 5th to the 15th century. It seeks papers that engage with the specific transcultural dynamics of a geographical and historical area containing highly diverse political, social, and religious entities, as well as with the multi-layered connectivities that can be traced in the Italian South, across the Mediterranean, and beyond.

We invite contributions from Art History, Archaeology, History, Anthropology, Paleography, and related disciplines that deal with the cultural diversity of Late Antique and medieval Southern Italy with special attention to sites, monuments, landscapes, images, and objects, as well as to the visual and aesthetic spheres in general. We are primarily interested in exploring horizontal and vertical dynamics, in terms of time (synchronicity/diachronicity) and space (global/Mediterranean/local scales). Papers with a theoretical and historiographical approach are particularly welcome.

Main topics to be addressed might include:

-Artistic contacts and interactions in the Italian South, in a transregional and global perspective
-Centripetal and centrifugal paths of exchange, transmission, and appropriation
-Cross-cultural migration of objects, images, and techniques among spaces, contexts, and media: practices of reuse, appropriation, and interpretation
-Sites, places, and spaces of cultural interactions, such as cities and courts
-Religious interactions in sacred space and rituals
-Local persistence and reinterpretation of the (antique) past in different political and/or cultural scenarios
-The fascination of the (medieval) Italian South, from the 18th century to the present day
-The notion of “Southern Italian”, as it relates to the study of medieval art, and its historiographical consequences

Proposals of max. 1 page should be sent by 20​ ​September 2017 to the editors: escirocco@gmail.com and dirwolf@khi.fi.it. The deadline for the submission of articles is 30 November 2017.

Convivium V/1 will be published in March 2018.

Articles Submission:
Contributions (30,000-40,000 characters including spaces, and up to 15 full-color illustrations) must be sent by 30 November 2017 to Karolina Foletti, executive editor of the journal: karolina.foletti@gmail.com.
Languages accepted: English, French, German, Italian.
Each article will be evaluated through a double-blind peer-review process.

For the Style Guide, please see: http://www.earlymedievalstudies.com/convivium.html

Job: 2 Research Assistant positions, Technische Universität Berlin

43953b1e445c551addb67d5d974a0e6fJob: 2 positions – Research Assistant (Postdoc), Berliner Hochschulen, Technische Universität Berlin (Faculty I, Institute for Art History and Historical Urban Studies/Chair for Modern Art History)
Part-time employment may be possible
Length of contract: 01/09/17 until 31/08/2020
Reference number: I-79/17
Salary grade E13 TV-L
Closing date for applications: 21/04/17

The research cluster “Translocations” at the Institute for Art History
and Historical Urban Studies at the Technische Universität Berlin is
seeking to hire two postdoctoral researchers for its team. The project
is funded through the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz-Prize of the DFG,
awarded to Prof. Dr. Bénédicte Savoy in 2016. The research cluster will
study large-scale displacements of cultural assets from antiquity to
the 20th century such as: art theft and spoliation organized by the
state in times of war and occupation, seizure of cultural goods during
colonialism, displacements as a result of a partition of excavation
discoveries or research expeditions, material diaspora of entire
civilizations expedited by the art trade, and confiscations justified
through ideology, nationalization, or en masse disposal of private
property. The key objective of “Translocations” is to compile a
comprehensive selection of historical findings in order to deliver
orientation and direction for dealing with the challenges posed by this
topic now and in the future. For further information on the research
cluster see www.kuk.tu-berlin.de/menue/translocations/parameter/en.

Working field: The candidate will have the opportunity to pursue his or
her own research interests within the context of an interdisciplinary
team and the overall research goals of the project cluster. This
includes the development and execution of both independent and
team-based studies. The candidate will independently produce work for
academic publication and work within the team on the four foundational
projects of the research cluster (a digital atlas, a virtual library, a
glossary, and an image repertory). The candidate will also be involved
in the organization of academic events and the management of the
project cluster. For further information about the position, please
contact Prof. Dr. Bénédicte Savoy (via Eyke Vonderau:
vonderau@tuberlin.de).

Requirements: Candidates must have completed a university degree
(Diplom, Master, or equivalent) as well as a completed doctoral degree
(or expectedly completed until 01/09/17), in a discipline related to
the project (art history, history, archeology, area studies,
literature, cultural studies, or ethnology; depending on research
focus, candidates from the legal sciences, sociology, or other related
fields will also be considered); Research interest and academic
experience related to the topic of the project cluster; Historical
knowledge of at least one of the relevant regions and periods; Very
good English and German language skills. Proficiency in at least one
other language relevant to the project is a plus (e.g. Arabic, Chinese,
Greek, Russian, Turkish). Candidates should preferably have experience
and be comfortable working in an interdisciplinary team, and possess
excellent collaboration and communication skills.

The application materials (including an outline of 250-300 words for a
case study in the project, a cover letter, the CV, and copies of
certificates) should be sent in a single PDF file to
annick.trellu@tu-berlin.de. Please mark all application materials with
the reference number above. Applications by email are strongly
preferred; however, applications may also be sent per mail to
Technische Universität Berlin – Der Präsident -, Fakultät I, Institut
für Kunstwissenschaft und Historische Urbanistik, FG Kunstgeschichte,
Frau Prof. Dr. Savoy, Sekr. A 56, Straße des 17. Juni 150/152, 10623
Berlin.

To ensure equal opportunities between women and men, applications by
women with the required qualifications are explicitly desired.
Qualified individuals with disabilities will be favored.

Please send copies only. Original documents will not be returned.

The vacancy is also available on the internet at
https://stellenticket.de/33306/?lang=en

CFP: Authority beyond the Law: Traditional and Charismatic Authority in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Ioannou Centre, Oxford, 3 December 2016

corona ferreaCall for papers: Authority beyond the Law: Traditional and Charismatic Authority in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Ioannou Centre, Oxford, 3 December 2016.
Deadline: 16th September 2016.

In Economy and Society, Max Weber theorised three ideal types of authority: charismatic, traditional and legal. While legal authority has been well-explored in modern scholarship and most resembles the structures of authority in our own world, more recent work has indicated the importance of the charismatic and traditional ideal types as lenses for viewing Ancient and Medieval authority. Thus, in his 2016 monograph, Dynasties, Jeroen Duindam stresses the importance of charisma to royal power, exploring the pageantry of power, ritual actions undertaken to safeguard the harvest or control the weather, and the personal delivery of justice, while Kate Cooper, especially in The Fall of the Roman Household, has argued that power in the ancient world was inseparably linked to individual households in a way similar to Weber’s theorising of traditional authority, making the (late) Roman ‘state’ seem significantly smaller than it has tended to before.

By bringing together scholars of many different periods and contexts, we intend to explore the value of Weber’s traditional and charismatic types for understanding changes, continuities and complexities in the construction of authority across Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Submissions might consider the following themes:

  • The use of the irrational and supernatural as a basis of authority
  • Ways that charismatic authority perpetuated itself without the creation of legal authority
  • The interactions between charisma and tradition within individual contexts
  • The use of traditional and charismatic authority legitimise law and legal instruments (rather than vice versa)
  • Status groups’ use of appeals to time-honoured rights and the distant past to legitimate their authority
  • The use of tradition and charisma by heretics and rebels to construct their own authority and delegitimise that of their opponents
  • The applicability of Weber’s typology to non-political authority and to the authority of places and objects
  • The influence of ideas about the ancient and Medieval worlds on sociological thought about authority (and vice versa)

Publication of some or all of the papers may be sought as a themed journal issue.

Submission: We welcome graduate students and early career researchers in Classics, Medieval Studies and other disciplines to submit abstracts of 20 minute papers to authoritybeyondthelaw@gmail.com by the 16th September 2016.

Call for papers: Miracles and Wonders in Antiquity and Byzantium

Chora, Multiplication of the loaves (Underwood)INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: Miracles and Wonders in Antiquity and Byzantium University of Cyprus, 16-18 October 2014

Tales of miracle and wonder decorate both ancient and Byzantine literature and seem
to have had a great impact upon ancient and Byzantine thought. A strong interest in
the wondrous is already apparent in the works of Homer and Hesiod. However, a
more organized recording of marvels is detected much later, in Herodotus’s time,
when marvelous stories and travel accounts of exotic places and peoples are
increasingly produced. From the era of Alexander and onwards such stories are
recruited by historians and rhetors in an attempt to apotheose the ideal ruler. Between
the third century BC and the third century AD, the genre of paradoxography,
collections of stories relating strange events and phenomena, achieves great
popularity, and influences another new genre, the Hellenistic novel. At about the same
time, a number of stories circulate that relate the miraculous healings of suffering
people who practice incubation in Asclepian temples. Later the practice of incubation
is taken over by Christian pilgrims who are cured by saints. Miraculous healings and
other types of miracles that are associated with a particular Christian shrine become
the material of a new genre, the miracle collection which is cultivated throughout the
Byzantine era. Miracle stories are included in all Byzantine hagiographical genres,
since they constitute the strongest sign of holiness. Miracles and wonders are also
found in profane Byzantine genres, such as chronicles and romances. Despite the fact
that marvel literature enjoyed such a high popularity in antiquity and Byzantium, it
has been mostly dismissed by modern scholars as debased, boring and even
unintelligible, an attitude that has condemned this literature to obscurity.

The conference’s main aims are to bring to light miracle and wonder literature and to
open up new avenues of approach. Topics of exploration may include:
• Literary Theoretical Approaches
• Cultural Studies
• Psychological Approaches
• Comparative Literary Studies
• Linguistics

Specialists are invited to submit a thirty-minute paper in English on a relevant topic.
Due to budgetary constraints, the organizers cannot cover the speakers’ travel and
hotel costs. There is no registration fee for participation or attendance. Prospective
speakers are asked to submit by 30 April 2014 a title and a 400-word abstract to
Stavroula Constantinou (konstans@ucy.ac.cy) and Maria Gerolemou
(mariagerolemou@live.de).