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Conference: Intertwined Worlds: 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age

Conference: Intertwined Worlds: 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age, Free Library of Philadelphia/University of Pennsylvania Libraries, November 2-4, 2017

In partnership with the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Schoenberg Institute of Manuscript Studies (SIMS) at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries is pleased to announce the 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age.

Despite the linguistic and cultural complexity of many regions of the premodern world, religion supplies the basis of a strong material and textual cohesion that both crosses and intertwines boundaries between communities. This symposium will highlight the confluence of expressions of belief, ritual, and social engagement emerging in technologies and traditions of the world’s manuscript cultures, often beyond a single religious context. It will consider common themes and practices of textual, artistic, literary, and iconographic production in religious life across time and geography, from ancient precedents to modern reception and dissemination in the digital age.

The program will begin Thursday evening at 5:00 pm on November 2nd, 2017, at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Parkway Central Library, with a keynote lecture by Phyllis Granoff, Yale University. The symposium will continue November 3rd-4th at the Kislak Center of Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries.

Speakers include:

  • Iqbal Akhtar, Florida International University
  • Paul Dilley, University of Iowa
  • Ellen Gough, Emory University
  • Thibaud d’Hubert, University of Chicago
  • Zsuzsanna Gulácsi, Northern Arizona University
  • Ayesha Irani, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • Shazia Jagot, University of Surrey
  • Samantha Kelly, Rutgers University
  • Jinah Kim, Harvard University
  • Gila Prebor, Bar-Ilan University
  • Michael Pregill, Boston University
  • Michael Stanley-Baker, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
  • Columba Stewart, Hill Museum & Monastic Library and Saint John’s University
  • Justine Walden, University of Toronto
  • Tyler Williams, University of Chicago
  • Saymon Zakaria, Bangla Academy, Dhaka
  • Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet, Bar-Ilan University

Click here for program and abstracts.


Registration fee will be $35 ($10 for students with valid student ID). Registration open now until Nov 3, 2017. Click here to register. Walk-in registrations will be accepted for a fee of $45 ($15 for students with valid student ID) to be paid in cash.

The symposium is made possible with the generous support of the Center for Ancient Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

For more information on the Schoenberg Symposium Series, click here.

6 CfP for ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

[1] Venice, Materiality, and the Byzantine World

[2] De-Centering the Romanesque

[3] Creative Modes of Activating the Early Medieval Manuscript

[4] Creative Strategies of Intellectual Engagement with Tradition and the Auctores

[5] “Manuscripts in the Curriculum”: New Perspectives on Using Medieval Manuscripts in the Undergraduate Classroom from Special Collection Librarians, Faculty, and Booksellers (A Roundtable)

[6] Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

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[1]

Venice, Materiality, and the Byzantine World

Sponsored by the Italian Art Society, 

Deadline: Sep 15, 2017

The Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium leading to the 2010 publication of San Marco, Byzantium, and the Myths of Venice introduced new perspectives on Byzantine and Venetian visual and material culture that extended Otto Demus’s survey of Saint Mark’s basilica. The authors’ application of more recent approaches—such as the social function of spolia, the act of display, the construction of identity, and cultural hybridity—brought fresh analyses to a complex and richly decorated monument. This panel seeks to expand this methodological discourse by taking into account questions related to materials, materiality, and intermediality between Venice and Byzantium. The arrival of material culture from the Byzantine world to Venice as gifts, spoils, or ephemera during the centuries surrounding the Fourth Crusade allowed for both appropriation and conceptual transformation of material culture. In light of the renewal in interest of Venice’s Byzantine heritage, this panel seeks to reflect on the interaction of material culture between la Serenissima and the Byzantine world, especially during the eleventh through fifteenth centuries. Topics may be wide-ranging, including, but not limited to: issues of reception and cultural translation; changing concepts of preciousness; different valuation of materials between Venice and Byzantium; the fluctuating simulation of material visual effects; the transformation of Byzantine objects incorporated into Venetian frames; intermedial dialogue between Byzantine and Venetian art; and the process and technique of manufacture of works between Byzantium and Venice. Some points of departure may include: the building of San Marco itself; Byzantine objects in the Treasury; Byzantine manuscripts included as part of the Cardinal Bessarion gift to the Republic; the monuments on Torcello; or issues raised as a result of recent conservation projects. New cross-cultural methodologies from art historical, anthropological, or sociological fields are welcome.
Please submit a 300-word abstract and a completed Participant 
Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) by 

September 15 to the session organizers:

Brad Hostetler, Kenyon College, hostetler1@kenyon.edu, Joseph Kopta, Pratt Institute, jkopta@pratt.edu
In addition to the travel awards available to all Congress participants (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/awards), the Italian Art Society offers competitive travel grants: http://italianartsociety.org/grants-opportunities/travel-grant-information/

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[2]

De-Centering the Romanesque

Dommuseum Hildesheim & The J. Paul Getty Museum

The canonical emphasis of Romanesque studies on regional centers and monuments has overshadowed aspects of transregional exchange that defined the art and culture of medieval western Europe circa 1000-1250. One of the key characteristics of this period is movement — of peoples, ideas, and materials. This session will explore the themes of portability and exchange, with possible topics addressing Mediterranean and Baltic trade networks, transcultural objects in the western treasuries, pseudo-scripts and their varied meanings, and hoards versus monuments. Participants are encouraged to address the concept of nexus versus center and the pedagogical implications for presenting a de-centered and global Romanesque, with papers that either challenge or affirm the Romanesque frame for teaching medieval art, both in the classroom and in the museum.

Please send your proposal of up to one page with your Participant Information Form (PIF) http://wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF to the organizers: Kristen Collins, J. Paul Getty Museum, KCollins@getty.edu or Gerhard Lutz, Dommuseum Hildesheim, gerhard.lutz@dommuseum-hildesheim.de

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[3] and [4]

Deadline: Sep 1, 2017

Two sessions for, “Identifying Creative Impulses in Early Medieval Art and Culture,” will convene at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, MI.

Papers are solicited that encourage novel—even experimental—approaches, to the exploration and identification of various conceptions of early medieval, creative cultural activity. 

The first panel seeks to engage with the actual haptic and experiential practice of manufacturing, reading and studying the early medieval book.

The second panel focuses upon culturally apposite forms of interpretative and compositional fashioning that can be discerned in manuscripts belonging to the liberal arts traditions of the Early Middle Ages.

Abstracts and paper proposals of not more than 250 words can be submitted via email on or before September 1, 2017 to the session organizers: Eric Ramírez-Weaver (emr6m@virginia.edu) and Lynley Anne Herbert (lherbert@thewalters.org). Please copy both co-organizers when submitting a proposal, posing a question, or requesting additional information via email.

Complete panel descriptions follow. We particularly encourage inventive strategies promising new approaches to the investigation of early medieval creativity.

Identifying Creative Impulses in Early Medieval Art and Culture
Special Sessions organized by Eric Ramírez-Weaver (emr6m@virginia.edu) and Lynley Anne Herbert (lherbert@thewalters.org)

I. Creative Modes of Activating the Early Medieval Manuscript

The way a manuscript behaves when used “in the flesh,” so to speak, can at times reveal layers of creativity built into them, which must be actively experienced rather than passively seen. Often as modern scholars we work from digitized images of individual folios, or at best openings, and “page flipping” technologies (such as the Walters’s “Ex Libris” platform or the British Library’s “Turning the Pages” program) provide a false sense that we are experiencing the physical book. Evidence of the performative qualities of a manuscript can at times be rediscovered, not just in the sense of how a reader might perform the text written in the book, but how the user activated the book as an object during use. Does an image show through a page and become part of the visual experience on the other side, and was there intentionality there? Do images interact across an opening? Does imagery function together from recto to verso? How is the artist creating an experience for the user, or conversely, how did the user alter the book to create a personal experience? This session seeks papers that explore creative approaches that open up new possibilities regarding how early medieval manuscripts functioned as objects.
II. Creative Strategies of Intellectual Engagement with Tradition and the Auctores

Recent scholarship (consider Benjamin Anderson, Lynda Coon, Paul Edward Dutton, Rosamond McKitterick, Lawrence Nees, Eric Ramírez-Weaver, and Immo Warntjes), has increasingly emphasized the creative strategies for intervention and manufacture of meaning that were acutely linked to early medieval eastern and western engagements with various aspects of the liberal art traditions. From star pictures to poetic acrostics, devotion to erudition and pious personal reform transformed the possibilities for innovation that proliferated during the Carolingian period. Interlocking networks of artists, chroniclers, historians, and poets communicated their translations, textual redactions, and visual records of classical tradition and contemporary study with one another, engaged in debate or collaboration, but advancing science. This session seeks papers willing to reconsider methodologically apposite ways to reinterpret the various brands of early medieval creativity manifest in texts pertaining (as broadly as possible) to the seven liberal arts, including texts of astronomical, computistical, rhetorical, geometric, arithmetic, musical, lyrical, philosophical, diagrammatic, or historical significance.

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[5]

“Manuscripts in the Curriculum”: New Perspectives on Using Medieval Manuscripts in the Undergraduate Classroom from Special Collection Librarians, Faculty, and Booksellers (A Roundtable)

Deadline: Sep 10, 2017

Integrating medieval manuscripts into an undergraduate curriculum changes the game. Students are transformed from passive learners to active scholars; observing objects and seeking to understand and interpret their context teaches critical thinking. Implementing programs to give students this opportunity requires the cooperation of special collection librarians and faculty, two disciplines that speak slightly different languages. Inspired by Les Enluminures’s new program Manuscripts in the Curriculum<http://www.textmanuscripts.com/curatorial-services/manuscripts&gt;, this session will also introduce a third perspective and explore the practical issues of how to build collections for teaching.

The session organizers wish to bring people together from these communities to share their experiences, to discuss successful results, to analyze problems, and to envision future directions. We invite papers that explore efforts to bring manuscripts into the classroom, and the challenges of implementing these programs at specific institutions from the perspectives of librarians, faculty, and booksellers. The session will be structured as a roundtable with a series of short ten- and fifteen-minute papers (the number and duration to be determined depending on response), with ample time for discussion.

Please send abstracts of no more than a page, along with a current CV and the Participation Information Form (available on the Medieval Congress Submissions page: http://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to lauralight@lesenluminures.com<mailto:lauralight@lesenluminures.com> by September 10, and sooner if possible.
Emily Runde, Text Manuscripts Specialist

Les Enluminures

http://www.lesenluminures.com&lt;http://www.lesenluminures.com&gt;

http://www.textmanuscripts.com&lt;http://www.textmanuscripts.com&gt;
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[6]

Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

Deadline: Sep 10, 2017

(Courtauld Institute of Art) and Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne). Deadline: 10 September 2017

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artefacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts. For more information visit: http://www.medievalart.org/kress-travel-grant/

CfP: Memory and Lineage in Medieval Romance, Leeds IMC 2018

The 25th Leeds International Medieval Congress has a special thematic strand of ‘memory’. Medieval romance lends itself to thinking about memory, in many ways, and not least because of its preoccupation with lineage. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of memory and/or lineage in medieval romance. The brief is deliberately broad, so please feel free to interpret according to your interest. Some thematic and theoretical approaches to consider may be: 

– inheritance / heritage / legacy

– remembering and recognition

– family histories and family politics

– textual lineage.

Please email proposals (250 words max.) to Kirsty Bolton (University of Southampton) and Grace Timperley (University of Manchester) at lineageinromance@gmail.com by 25 August 2017. 

New Illuminated Manuscript Digitisation Project with British Library & BnF: Polonsky Foundation

The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200

A new project is underway to open up further the unparalleled collections of illuminated manuscripts held by the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France. In a ground-breaking new collaborative project the national libraries of Britain and France will work together to create two innovative new websites that will make 800 manuscripts decorated before the year 1200 available freely. The Bibliothèque nationale de France will create a new bilingual website that will allow side-by-side comparison of 400 manuscripts from each collection, selected for their beauty and interest. The British Library will create a bilingual website intended for a general audience that will feature highlights from the most important of these manuscripts and articles commissioned by leading experts in the field. Both websites will be online by November 2018.

Before the introduction of printing to Europe, all books were written by hand as manuscripts. The most luxurious of these were illuminated, literally ‘lit up’ by decorations and pictures in brightly coloured pigments and burnished gold leaf. All manuscripts — whether they are luxurious biblical or liturgical manuscripts, copies of classical literature or patristic, theological, historical or scientific texts — are valuable historical documents that can deepen and expand our understanding of the political, social and cultural life of the eras in which they were made. Their research value is inestimable.

The British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France have two of the largest collections of medieval manuscripts in the world. As a result of France and England being so closely entwined through periods of war, conquest and alliance and, in the medieval period, both nations claiming territory in France at times, both libraries have particularly strong holdings of French manuscripts produced in France or in Britain (but written in French or Latin).

tours

Decorated initial ‘I’(nitium) from western France, perhaps Brittany or Tours, 9th century (British Library Egerton MS 609, f. 46r).

 

This new project will add to the growing numbers of manuscript material available in full online as part of wider programmes to make these cultural treasures available to everyone around the world. At the British Library, over 8,000 items are currently available on our Digitised Manuscripts website. Similarly, thousands of items are available from the Bibliothèque nationale de France collections on its website, Gallica.

This exciting project is made possible by a generous grant from The Polonsky Foundation. Dr Leonard Polonsky remarks that ‘our Foundation is privileged to be supporting these two leading institutions in preserving the riches of the world’s cultural heritage and making them available in innovative and creative ways, both to scholars and to a wider public’.

The Polonsky Foundation is a UK-registered charity which primarily supports cultural heritage, scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, and innovation in higher education and the arts. Its principal activities include the digitisation of significant collections at leading libraries (the British Library; the Bibliothèque nationale de France; the Bodleian Library, Oxford; Cambridge University Library; the New York Public Library; the Library of Congress; the Vatican Apostolic Library); support for Theatre for a New Audience at the Polonsky Shakespeare Center in Brooklyn, New York; and post-doctoral fellowships at The Polonsky Academy for the Advanced Study of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute. Its founder and chairman, Dr Leonard S. Polonsky, was named a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) for charitable services in 2013.

The focus on the digitisation project will be on manuscripts produced on either side of the English Channel between 700 and 1200. The manuscripts from this period open up a window on a time of close cultural and political exchange during which scribes moved and worked in what is now France, Normandy and England. Decorated manuscripts containing literary, historical, biblical and theological texts will be included, representing the mutual strengths of the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Online access to these manuscripts will support new research into how manuscripts — and people — travelled around Europe in this period. New connections will be made possible by studying the two collections side by side.

For example, the manuscripts selected will include a number of illuminated Gospel-books, providing a witness to the changing tastes, influences and borrowings reflected in the books’ design and script. So a 9th-century, a 10th-century and a late 12th-century Gospel-book all have colourful illuminated initials with geometric patterns, floral decoration or animals heads, yet their execution is very different. The script, colours, style and subjects of the illumination all provide clues to the time and place of their composition. With the digitisation of manuscripts all these features may be studied and enjoyed in detail.

As well as making 800 manuscripts freely available online, the project will be part of a wider programme of activities aimed at researchers and the general public. A number of the manuscripts digitised will be displayed in a major international exhibition on Anglo-Saxon England to be held at the British Library from October 2018 to February 2019, which will highlight connections between Anglo-Saxon England and the Continent.

A conference at the British Library will coincide with the Anglo-Saxon exhibition (December 2018), and a project conference will be held at the Bibliothèque nationale de France. An illustrated book showcasing beautiful and significant manuscripts from the collections will also be produced. Another output will be a film on the digitisation project that, together with the other aspects of the public programme, will open up new paths into collections for a variety of audiences.

The original version of this blog post in the British Library Medieval Manuscripts Blog can be found here.

Adapted for Medieval Art Research blog by Amy Jeffs

Original text by Tuija Ainonen

tag

Conf: The Book as Medium: Medieval Manuscripts & their Functions, VIENNA (1st – 2nd Sep 2017)

01. – 02.09.2017
Registration deadline: Aug 15, 2017

Das Buch als Medium – Mittelalterliche Handschriften und ihre Funktionen
Interdisziplinäre Graduiertentagung

Universität Wien
Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Altes AKH
Spitalgasse 2, Hof 9
1090 Wien

While participation is free we ask that delegates register via this link by 15. August 2017:
tagung.buchfunktion.kunstgeschichte@univie.ac.at

PROGRAMM

Freitag, 01. September 2017

08:30 – 09:00 Uhr: Registrierung, Kennenlernen, Kaffee
09:00 – 09:15 Uhr: Grußworte

09:15 – 10:15 Uhr: Keynote
09:15 – 10:15 Uhr Kathryn Rudy (St. Andrews)

10:15 – 10:30 Uhr: Pause

10:30 – 12:00 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Gerd Micheluzzi)
10:30 Uhr
Kristina Kogler (Wien): Vidal Mayor – Die Bebilderung einer
aragonesischen Rechtshandschrift
10:50 Uhr     Diskussion
11:00 Uhr
Bernhard Kjölbye (Graz): Über den Bildschmuck der ‚Zwettler Bärenhaut‘
aus genealogischer Sicht
11:20 Uhr Diskussion
11:30 Uhr
Philippa Sissis (Berlin): Zwischen Lesen und Schreiben – Humanistische
Inszenierung in Relation zum Text
11:50 Uhr Diskussion

12:00 – 14:00 Uhr: Mittagspause

14:00 – 18:30 Uhr: Ausflug zum Augustiner-Chorherrenstift
Klosterneuburg (für Mitwirkende)

19:00 Uhr: Abendessen

Samstag, 02. September

08:45 – 09:00 Uhr: Kaffee

09:00 – 10:30 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Christina Jackel)
09:00 Uhr
Sophie Zimmermann (Wien): Büchergenealogien. Über imaginierten und
tatsächlichen Verlust deutschsprachiger Texte und Handschriften
09:20 Uhr Diskussion
09:30 Uhr
Timo Bülters (Oxford): Auf Spurensuche im Kloster – Ein niederdeutsches
Kräuterbuch in Nonnenhand
09:50 Uhr Diskussion
10:00 Uhr
Giulia Rossetto (Wien): Using and Re-Using Parchment Manuscripts: The
Case of the Byzantine Prayer-Books
10:20 Uhr Diskussion

10:30 – 10:50 Uhr: Pause

10:50 – 12:20 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Lena Sommer)
10:50 Uhr
Alexander Hödlmoser (Wien):    Die Österreichische Chronik der Jahre
1454 bis 1467. Editorische Anmerkungen zur Arbeit am Text – damals und
heute
11:10 Uhr Diskussion
11:20 Uhr
Eszter Nagy (Budapest): The Function of Mythological Images in Books of
Hours from Rouen
11:40 Uhr     Diskussion
11:50 Uhr
Irina von Morzé (Wien): Eine Weltgeschichte für den Kaiser: Rom, BAV,
Vat. lat. 5697 (vor 1437)
12:10 Uhr Diskussion

12:20 – 13:45 Uhr: Mittagspause

13:45 – 14:45 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Sophie Dieberger)
13:45 Uhr
Lisa Horstmann (Heidelberg): Der »Welsche Gast« von Thomasin von
Zerclaere. Veränderung der Bild-Text-Relation in 300 Jahren
Überlieferungsgeschichte
14:05 Uhr Diskussion
14:15 Uhr
Maximilian Wick (München): Die Leidener Wigalois-Handschrift – Ausdruck
einer subversiven Theologie?
14:35 Uhr Diskussion

14:50 – 15:10 Uhr: Pause

15:10 – 16:10 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Silvia Hufnagel)
15:10 Uhr
Stefanie Krinninger (Göttingen): „Het ich nu kunsten spyse / in mir,
daz ich […] / in ditz buch […] / Ein rede kunde getichten …“. Zum
Kunstbegriff des späten Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit
15:30 Uhr Diskussion
15:40 Uhr
Dennis Wegener (Wien): Das handschriftlich nachgetragene 117. Kapitel
des Theuerdank-Drucks Rar. 325a der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek München
16:00 Uhr Diskussion

16:10 – 16:30 Uhr: Pause

16:30 – 17:30 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Andrea Riedl)
16:30 Uhr
Justyna Kuczyńska (Krakau): The Franciscan Breviary (Ms. Czart. 1211)
in the Library of Princes Czartoryski in Kraków as a Masterpiece of the
Neapolitan Illumination Art under the Aragonese Dynasty
16:50 Uhr Diskussion
17:00 Uhr
Christina Weiler (Wien): Die Meditationes vitae Christi –
Franziskanische Devotionshandschriften des Trecento
17:20 Uhr Diskussion

17:20 – 18:00 Uhr: Abschlussdiskussion

CFP: Schaffen und Nachahmen (Tuebingen, 17-20 Mar 19)

Tuebingen.png

Das 18. Symposium findet unter dem Titel „Schaffen und Nachahmen. Kreative Prozesse im Mittelalter“ vom 17.-20. März 2019 in Tübingen statt.

In der Gegenwart wird das Verhältnis von Schaffen und Nachahmen und deren Bedeutung für kreative Prozesse neu ausgehandelt: Die Postmoderne hat das Subjekt dezentriert und intensiv über den Tod des Autors diskutiert. Die Möglichkeiten, die erst die Informationstechnologie und das Internet eröffnet haben, generieren neuartige Debatten über die Grenzen von Urheberschaft und das Verhältnis von Original und Kopie, Zitat und Plagiat. I m Internet ist ein Urheberrecht kaum zu behaupten, „Copy and Paste“ sind längst Praxis. Hier werden Seiten gespiegelt, Aussagen, Bilder und Filme anderer Seiten kompiliert, Zitate nicht mehr angeführt, sondern verlinkt. Symptome dieses Wandels kreativer Prozesse sind etwa die Diskussionen über Helene Hegemanns Roman „Axolotl Roadkill“ (2010) und das Kompilieren als künstlerisches Verfahren oder
auch die – durchaus politischen – Debatten über die Grenzen des Plagiats in der Wissenschaft.
Für das Tübinger Symposium möchten wir diese aktuellen  Veränderungen zum Anlass nehmen, nach dem Spannungsverhältnis von Schaffen und Nachahmen im Mittelalter zu fragen und uns so der Frage der Kreativität im Mittelalter zuzuwenden. Wir gehen davon aus, dass die Manuskript-und Objektkulturen dieser Epoche Vorstellungen, Diskurse und Praktiken hervorgebracht haben, die es in dieser Hinsicht zu analysieren lohnt.
Zu diskutieren wäre auch, inwiefern die historischen Phänomene dabei gegenwärtigen Entwicklungen nicht sogar näher stehen als jenen der westlichen Moderne mit ihren spezifischen Konzepten von Autorschaft, Urheberrecht, Originalität, Plagiat. Damit ist selbstverständlich keine Rückkehr ins Mittelalter behauptet – sehr wohl aber die Frage
aufgeworfen, ob sich das Verhältnis unserer eigenen Kultur zu den Kulturen des  Mittelalters noch ohne weiteres über dieselben dichotomischen Modelle der Alterität von Mittelalter und Moderne beschreiben lässt, wie es spätestens seit den 1980er Jahren vielfach üblich gewesen ist.

Der Spannung von Schaffen und Nachahmen bei kreativen Prozessen in dem weiten Zeitraum vom 6. bis zum 15. Jahrhundert wollen wir interdisziplinär besonders in drei Feldern nachgehen: Original – Kopie, Urbild – Abbild, Entkontextualisierung – Neukontextualisierung.

1. Original – Kopie: Die Unterscheidung von Original und Kopie ist seit jeher Teil historischer Kritik und deshalb in verschiedensten mediävistischen Fächern – von der Kunstgeschichte bis zu historischen Grundwissenschaften wie der Diplomatik – von zentraler Bedeutung. Die Übergänge zwischen Original, Kopie, Rezension, réécriture,
Überarbeitung und neuem Text waren dabei aber in den Manuskriptkulturen des Mittelalters oft genug fließend. Daraus entspringen Phänomene, die aktuell nicht zuletzt für Editionen mittelalterlicher Texte diskutiert werden: Interessanterweise eröffnen gerade das Internet und elektronische Editionen Möglichkeiten, ein Charakteristikum
mittelalterlicher Überlieferung und Textualität neu und präziser abzubilden und wissenschaftlich zu erschließen. Zugleich hat die Forschung aber auch herausgestellt, dass das Verständnis der beiden Kategorien „Original“ und „Kopie“ wie auch deren
Bewertung kulturell bedingt und historisch wandelbar sind: Zeitgenossen des Mittelalters konnten beispielsweise Kopien der Grabeskirche in Jerusalem auch dort noch sehen, wo ein heutiger Betrachter kaum eine Gemeinsamkeit zu erkennen vermag. Originalität konnte gerade in der neuen Zusammenstellung und Ordnung alten Wissens gesehen werden – oder sogar als problematisch eingestuft werden.

2. Urbild – Abbild: Die Zuordnung von Urbild und Abbild gehört zu den grundlegenden Konzepten neuplatonischer Philosophie und Theologie – in ihr drückt sich die Differenz wie die Zusammengehörigkeit zugleich aus; Abbildhaftigkeit ist so auch ein Partizipationsvorgang, in dem die Kreativität des Menschen als Nachahmung des göttlichen Schaffens verstanden wird. Ihre Bedeutung reicht aber weit über diese Bereiche hinaus: Übersetzungsprozesse etwa der hochmittelalterlichen Epik wissen gleichfalls um das komplexe Verhältnis zwischen einem nachahmenden Abbild und einem vorgeprägten Urbild. Kunststile entwickeln sich vielfach durch Nachahmung, so wie auch ganze Stadtensemble – Rom oder Jerusalem – in anderen architektonischen Kontexten abgebildet werden und Anteil an ihrem Urbild geben. Theologisch wird das Verhältnis grundlegend in der Frage der Gottebenbildlichkeit behandelt, aber auch im Blick auf liturgische Fragen wie im byzantinischen Bilderstreit oder im  Eucharistiestreit im Frankenreich des 9. Jahrhunderts. Literarisch und rechtshistorisch ist zu fragen, in welcher Weise in früher einfach als „Fälschungen“ eingeordneten Nachahmungsvorgängen – etwa bei Pseudo-Isidor, Benedictus Levita oder Pseudo-Dionysios – im Abbildcharakter auch die Partizipation am Urbild mitschwingt.

3. Entkontextualisierung – Neukontextualisierung: Die beschriebenen Prozesse betreffen nicht nur Objekte als Ganze, sondern auch ihre Teile: Vielfach werden Einzelstücke aus ihrem originalen Kontext in einen neuen Kontext gesetzt. Zitate gewinnen einen neuen Charakter, wenn sie in einen anderen literarischen Kontext gesetzt werden, Spolien lassen das Original noch erkennen und dienen doch einem ganz andern Zusammenhang und werden mit neuer Bedeutung aufgeladen. Eklektizismus bedient sich mannigfacher Stücke aus anderen Zusammenhängen, um sie zu einem neuen Ganzen zusammenzusetzen. Durch Vorgänge der Zitation oder des Reframings erfolgt eine mannigfache Umsemantisierung. So entstehen vielfach Werke, die leicht als nachahmende Kompilation abgewertet werden können, in denen aber die Persistenz des Vorgegebenen und die schöpferische Kraft der Neukonstitution eine anregende Spannung eingehen: Vorgegebenes wird bewahrt, neu zum Sprechen gebracht oder kreativ weiterentwickelt.

Das Thema eignet sich für mediävistische Fachvorträge der im Verband vertretenen Disziplinen. Es bietet darüber hinaus die Möglichkeit, eine Podiumsdiskussion über Urheberschaft und Plagiat im Zeitalter des Internets zu veranstalten, in der in produktiver Weise mediävistische Forschung mit gegenwärtigen Debatten vernetzt werden könnte. Außerdem ist das Thema geeignet, Schülersektionen zu veranstalten – und auf diese Weise die Epoche des Mittelalters noch weiter in der schulischen Praxis sichtbar zu machen.

Zu den genannten drei Themenfeldern werden Vorschläge für Sektions-oder Einzelbeiträge sowie interaktive workshops erbeten:
Dauer einer Sektion: in der Regel 1½ Stunden mit drei Vorträgen (inkl. Diskussion).
Vortragsdauer: nicht länger als 20 Minuten.
Bei von Teams selbstständig gestalteten Sektionen oder interaktiven workshops mit drei oder vier Vorträgen ist darauf zu achten, dass die Rede- und Diskussionszeit die vorgegebene Sektionsdauer von 1½ Stunden nicht überschreiten. Ferner sollen – im Sinne der interdisziplinären Ausrichtung des Verbandes – bei drei Vortragenden mindestens zwei, bei vier Vortragenden mindestens drei verschiedene Fächer beteiligt sein.

Die Veranstalter sind Ihnen dankbar, wenn die Exposés folgendem Aufbau folgen:
– Nummer des Themenblocks (s. o., 1-3)
– Ihre Adresse (inkl. E-mail); bei Sektionsvorschlägen die Adresse des/der Verantwortlichen
– Exposé von maximal 7000 Zeichen (Sektionsvorschlag) bzw. 1500 Zeichen (Einzelvorschlag, workshop)

Die Veranstalter bitten darum, die zu Sektionen gehörigen Exposés nicht auch einzeln einzureichen. Es wird ausdrücklich begrüßt, wenn in den Teams auch Nachwuchswissenschaftler/innen zu Wort kommen.

Bitte richten Sie Ihre Vorschläge, vorzugsweise per E-Mail mit Attachment, bis zum 28. Februar 2018 an folgende Adresse:

E-Mail: sekretariat.leppin@ev-theologie.uni-tuebingen.de

Prof. Dr. Volker Leppin
Evg.-Theol. Fakultät
Institut für Spätmittelalter und Reformation
Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
Liebermeisterstr. 12
D-72070 Tübingen

http://www.mediaevistenverband.de/symposium/17-symposium-2019/