Author Archives: medievalartresearch

Lecture: “Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross, Institute for Historical Research, 27/02/2018

Easby Cross

The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting the following lecture on Tuesday 27th February at 7pm:

Meg Boulton, speaking on ‘”Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross.

Location: Institute of Historical Research, Wolfson Room NB01, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend!

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Call for Papers: University of Kent Medieval and Early Modern Studies Summer Festival 15-16/06/2018, Deadline 23/03/2018

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Now in its fourth year, MEMS Summer Festival is a two-day celebration of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, including the study of religion, politics, history, art, drama, literature, and domestic culture from c. 400 – 1800. The festival, hosted at the University of Kent, is designed to bring together scholars from a range of disciplines, academic schools, and institutions. MEMS Fest aims to be an informal space in which postgraduate students, early career researchers, and academics can share ideas and foster conversations, while building a greater sense of community. Undergraduate students in their final year of study are also welcome to participate in the conference.

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Call for Papers: Illuminating the Dark Ages: Manuscript art and knowledge in the Early Medieval World (c. 600-1100), University of Edinburgh, 28-29/06/2018, Deadline 15/03/2018

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“Illuminating the Dark Ages” has been conceived as an international conference that aims to bring together researchers of all levels, including postgraduate students, working on the wider Early Middle Ages and the decorated manuscript as a cultural medium. From a variety of perspectives, this conference intends to shed light on how and why manuscripts were decorated in the early medieval period, from lavishly illuminated religious cycles to illustrations of works of Classical literature. Even though the geographical focus is put on the Latin West, comparative approaches to manuscript visual cultures and knowledge transmission in other cultural areas (roughly in the same chronological period), such as Byzantium or the Islamic world, are naturally welcomed.The keynote lectures will be delivered by Prof. Michele Bacci (Fribourg) and Dr. Felicity Harley-McGowan (Yale). Continue reading

Conference: “Bells and Smells: Sensory Experiences of the Medieval Liturgy”, Senate House, University of London, 24/02/2018

Bells and Smells

The five senses occupied an ambiguous place in medieval religious life. For generations of theologians and pastoral writers, the senses were gateways for sin to enter body and soul. And yet, in the rarefied environment of liturgical performance, they became the means by which mortals could apprehend the Almighty. Imagery, music, incense, touch and even taste played a role in shaping medieval worshippers’ encounters with the sacred. The papers in this conference consider how the senses were employed and how they were a source of both religious solidarity and controversy.

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Call for Papers: Art of The Invisible, Courtauld Institute of Art 19/10/2018, Deadline 14/05/2018

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An interdisciplinary conference at The Courtauld Institute of Art exploring art’s relationship with the invisible.

‘He even painted things that cannot be represented …’, Pliny eulogized Apelles in his Naturalis historia. ‘How can we with mortal eyes contemplate this image whose celestial splendour the host of heaven presumes not to behold?’, asks a Byzantine hymn dedicated to the celebrated Image of Edessa. Cennino Cennini, in the first chapter of his Libro dell’arte, writes that painting ‘…calls for imagination, and skill of hand, in order to discover things not seen, hiding themselves under the shadow of natural objects, and to fix them with the hand, presenting to plain sight what does not actually exist.’ In her 1949 essay Some memories of Pre-dada: Picabia and Duchamp, Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia tried to summarise the art of her era: ‘It would seem … that in every field, the principal direction of the 20th century was the attempt to capture the “nonperceptible”.’

Art has been preoccupied with the invisible before, between, and beyond these disparate yet kindred statements. One of artists’ greatest challenges is and has been representing the invisible subject, in its many guises. Artists working in media based on perception, such as painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, and installation, must devise strategies to visualise the invisible: It is a foundational paradox of art.

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Conference Mediterranean Artistic Interaction, Valletta 09/03/2018, Registration Deadline 07/03/2018

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University of Malta, Valletta campus, March 9, 2018
Registration deadline: Mar 7, 2018

The Dynamics of Mediterranean Artistic Interaction in the Late Medieval and Renaissance Periods
International Conference – Department of Art and Art History, University of Malta

Convener: Dr Charlene Vella

13:30 – 14:00
Registration

14:00
Welcome

First session (14:15 – 16:00) — chaired by Keith Sciberras

14:15 – 14:45
Mario Buhagiar (University of Malta): The Siculo-Byzantinesque ‘Virgin of St Luke’ at Mdina Cathedral, Malta

14:45 – 15:15
Kayoko Ichikawa (Universitè de Fribourg): The thirteenth-century Coronation of the Virgin in the context of Mediterranean artistic interaction

15:15 – 15:45
Keith Buhagiar (University of Malta): The Central Mediterranean dimension of Maltese Medieval cave-churches and their artistic relevance

15:45 – 16:00 question time

16:00 – 16:30 break

Second session (16:30  18:30) — chaired by Mario Buhagiar

16:30 – 17:00
Michele Bacci (Universitè de Fribourg): Dynamics of Cultural and Artistic Exchange in Hospitaller Rhodes (1310-1522)

17:00 – 17:30
Charlene Vella (University of Malta): The Madonna del Soccorso triptych at the Mdina Cathedral Museum: attribution and new considerations

17:30 – 18:00
Peter Humfrey (University of St Andrews): Venice, Cyprus and Venus

18:00 : 18:30 question time

18:30 Reception

Registration form: https://www.um.edu.mt/arts/historyart/form

For more information, contact the convener, Dr Charlene Vella on charlene.vella@um.edu.mt

Venue: Auditorium, University of Malta Valletta Campus, St Paul Street, Valletta

Upcoming Lectures at the British Archaeological Association 07/03/2018, 04/04/2018, 02/05/2018

BAA

The British Archaeological Association is delighted to announce our upcoming lectures:

7 March – ‘Awake thou that sleepest: The Resurrection of Mary Magdalene in Central Europe’ by Dr Zoe Opacic
4 April – ‘Bridgwater Friary: A provincial town and the Franciscan friars in late medieval Somerset’ by Dr Hannah Wesyt
2 May – ‘ Inventing Vaults in the Twelfth Century: Salamanca, Al-Andalus and France’ by Dr Tom Nickson

All lectures take place at the Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House (Piccadilly) at 5.00 pm. Tea is available from 4.30 pm.

Further information about the BAA, the lectures and past events can be found on our website https://thebaa.org/