Tag Archives: Institute of Historical Research

Institute of Historical Research’s European History, 1150-1550 Seminar

FilippoilbelloAll are welcome to attend the opening lecture of the 2018 autumn term for IHR’s seminar, European History, 1150-1550. Julien Théry ( University of Lyon) will present his lecture entitled, ‘The French Way. The Rift between The Papacy and Capetian Monarchy under Philip the Fair (1285-1314)’ this Thursday, 27th September.

The complete 2018-19 programme can be found here.

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London Society for Medieval Studies 2018-19 Programme

The London Society for Medieval Studies is back for the new academic year!

We are very excited that our autumn programme of seminars will be commencing soon. Please find attached our full programme for the autumn and spring terms 2018-19. Make sure to get those dates into your diary!

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Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

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Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

Fortnightly Thursdays 17:30, IHR Wolfson II unless noted; free, all welcome

Winter Term
29th September ** Senate House South Block Room 349 (3rd Floor)**
Chris Wickham (Oxford): Jiangnan style: Doing global economic history in the medieval period

13th October
Giorgio Lizzul (KCL): The republic, commerce, and public debt in the forged orations of Doge Tommaso Mocenigo

Kenneth Duggan (KCL): The limits of strong government: Attempts to control criminality in thirteenth-century England

27th October (jointly with History of Liturgy seminar)
Cecilia Gaposchkin (Dartmouth & UCL): Liturgy and devotion in the aftermath of the FourthCrusade: Nivelon of Soissons, the relics of 1204, and the cathedral of Soissons

10th November
Andrew Jotischky (Royal Holloway): The image of the Greek: Western views of orthodox monks and monasteries, c.1000-1500

24th November
Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg): Military expatriation to Muslim lands: Aragonese Christian mercenaries as trans-imperial subjects in the Late Middle Ages

8th December (** Senate House Room 246 **)
Justine Firnhaber-Baker (St Andrews): Who were the Jacques and what did they want? Social networks and community mobilization in the Jacquerie of 1358

Spring Term 2017

18th January (jointly with Earlier Middle Ages Seminar, **time & venue to be confirmed**)
Roundtable discussion of Cathars in Question ed. Antonio Sennis (Boydell & Brewer, 2016)

19th January (** Senate House, The Court Room**)
Sylvain Piron (EHESS): An individual institutionalization: Opicino de Canestris (1296– c.1354)

2nd February
Nicholas Vincent (UEA): Henry II’s Irish colony: Truth and fiction

16th February
Dominique Iogna-Prat (CNRS/EHESS): A stone church? Visibility, monumentality and spatiality of the Medieval Church (500-1500)

2nd March
Ella Kilgallon (QMUL): Visualising castitas in the Franciscan tradition: An analysis of three frescoes from central Italy

Ella Williams (UCL): History and prophecy in Naples: The Faits des Romains at the court of KingRobert ‘the Wise’

16th March
Jonathan Lyon (Chicago): Offices, officials and bureaucracy in late medieval Europe: The view from Germany

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL); IHR page http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/114.

Contact: John Sabapathy & Alice Taylor (j.sabapathy@ucl.ac.uk & alice.taylor@kcl.ac.uk).

Conference review: Commemoration of the Dead: new approaches, new perspectives, new material (15 November 2014)

There was a packed conference room in the newly-refurbished Institute of Historical Research at Senate House, as eager members of the Church Monuments and Monumental Brass Societies gathered to hear about new approaches to incised brass memorials. As a sequel of sorts to a conference reconsidering approaches to funerary monuments on the half-centenary of Panofsky’s Tomb Sculpture held at the Courtauld Institute in July, the stakes were high for a day on one of the potentially less-colourful genres of late medieval art production. However, the conference proved that brasses could also produce many novel and intellectually profitable methodologies, rather than inward-looking and basically descriptive case studies.

Heythrop, Oxfordshire

Stained glass commemorating John Ashfield (d. 1521), Heythrop parish church, Oxfordshire – via Flickr Martin Beek

Richard Marks (‘Brass and Glass’: the medieval tomb-window) began the day with some pearls he had discovered in his relentless trawling of late medieval parochial wills, and that “brass and glass” was more than just a rhyme: many church windows acted as surrogate funerary monuments. Without the wills, there would be no way of knowing that the fragments of stained glass were patronised by the memorialised person under our feet. The use of documents to consider individual agency was also explored by Jessica Knowles on All Saints North Street in York (’Controlling the Past’: the Medieval Brasses of All Saints North Street, York), and at the end of the day by Christian Steer on the brasses in the lost London convent of the Friars Minor (’A Melting Pot of Death’: Burials and Brasses in the London Grey Friars). This veritable carpet of memory raised the intriguing questions of why the Franciscans were so popular among well-to-do Londoners, and how the friars themselves – supposedly unable to own property – bought their own brasses.

Brügge, Sint-Jakobsplein, Sint-Jakobskerk, Kupfergrabplatte der Katheline d'Ault (St. James's Church, tomb cover of Catherine d'Ault)

Brass of Catherine d’Ault d.1451, St James, Bruges – via Flickr HEN-magonza

The idea of the importance of patrons’ agency in the design of memorials was raised in the paper by Matthew Ward discussing Chellaston alabaster workshops (Late Medieval Style: the Role of Agency and the Workshop). Michael Carter then showed how an alleged London Type-B brass in Fountains Abbey was almost certainly later than the usual timespan of that workshop; instead the evidence of the iconographical motif of raising a mitre to show off a cleric’s doctoral credentials gave us the identity of the commemorated abbot (The Mysterious Mitre on the Monument). Looking outside of the constraints of the medium continued: Harriette Peel (Women, Children and Guardian Angeles in Late Medieval Flemish Funerary Art) also used novel iconographical analysis to show that a Flemish brass commemorating a young girl may be making appeal to female hagiography through its inclusion of a guardian angel. Sanne Frequin brought colour to proceedings with some technical findings of the polychromy of Tournai Marble monuments: supposedly a “pure” medium like brass (Tournai Stone: an investigation of materiality).

Nijmegen, Sint Stevenskerk

Tomb of Catherine Bourboun (d.1465), St Stephen, Nijmegen – via Flickr Stewie1980

It is often forgotten that England, with its religious rather than social revolution, has a much richer corpus of funerary monuments than much of Europe. Ann Adams used the English corpus of tomb chest-top brasses to creatively illuminate the apparently peculiar choice of the genre over sculpted effigies by some Flemish nobles (‘Revealed and Concealed’: Monumental Brasses on Tomb Chests – the examples of John I, Duke of Cleves and Catherine of Bourbon). Robert Marcoux (The Social Meaning and Artistic Potential of a Medium: Brass and the Medieval Tombs of the Gaignières Collection) reminded us of the importance of the Gaignières collection in the absence of the physical objects, and demonstrated its statistical potential in mapping aesthetic tastes over time. The varied papers, coupled with a lively, knowledgeable and generous audience, made for a day that proved that the humble brass lurking under the carpet in many a parish church can prove a lucrative genre for the modern art historian’s inquiry.

This review was originally published in Medieval Memorial Research newsletter, a free biannual summary on current developments concerning research in memoria of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period (till circa 1600), and is part of Medieval Memoria Online.

Conference: Commemoration of the Dead (London, 15 November 2014)

Conference
Commemoration of the Dead: new approaches, new perspectives, new material
London, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, Malet Street
Saturday, 15 November 2014, 10am – 5pm

Brass_of_Simon_de_Felbrigge_and_wife_St_Margaret's_Church_Felbrigg_Norfolk

Recent years have witnessed a rapid growth in new research and consideration of commemorative brasses and funerary monuments. This one-day joint meeting, sponsored by the Monumental Brass Society and the Church Monuments Society, will explore these developments and, in particular, research techniques that have led to new insights within the broader context of funerary art. Speakers are primarily doctoral and early post-doctoral students.

9.30 Registration

10.00 Welcome by Christian Steer, Hon. Secretary, Monumental Brass Society

10.05 Richard Marks: ‘Brass and Glass’: the medieval tomb window

10.45 Session 1: Reassessing Workshops

Matthew Ward: Late Medieval Style: the Role of Agency and the Workshop
Michael Carter: The Mysterious Mitre on the Monument

11.45 Tea/coffee

12.15 Session 2: Form and Materials

Sanne Frequin: Tournai Stone: an investigation of materiality
Ann Adams: ‘Revealed and Concealed’: Monumental Brasses on High Relief Tombs – the examples of John I, Duke of Cleves and Catherine of Bourbon

13.15 Lunch (own arrangements)

14.30 Session 3: Contextualising Brasses – Politics, Family and Religion 

Harriette Peel: Women, Children and Guardian Angels in Late Medieval Flemish Funerary Art
Jessica Knowles: ‘Controlling the Past’: the Medieval Brasses of All Saints North Street, York

15.30 Tea/coffee

16.00 Session 4: Lost Brasses

Robert Marcoux: The Social Meaning and Artistic Potential of a Medium: Brass and the Medieval Tombs of the Gaignières Collection
Christian Steer: ‘A Melting Pot of Death’: Burials and Brasses in the London Grey Friars

17.00 Concluding Remarks: Martin Stuchfield, President, M.B.S., and Jean Wilson, President, C.M.S.

Registration:
It is anticipated that this event will be extremely popular and a pre-booked registration process is necessary for those who would like to attend. There is a strict capacity limit and places will be allocated on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Early booking is encouraged. The event is free for members of the Monumental Brass Society and Church Monuments Society but members are required to reserve a place by contacting the Hon. Secretary of the M.B.S. (details below) well in advance. Non-members are warmly welcome and to reserve a place should send a cheque for £15.00, made payable to the Monumental Brass Society, to the Hon. Secretary (see below). A special rate of £5.00 is available for student non-members. All delegates must pre-book in advance.

Refreshments:
There will be a morning and afternoon tea and coffee break available for delegates but lunch is not included. This area of Bloomsbury is well served with cafes, restaurants and pubs where lunch can be obtained.

To book: 
To book a place, please write/email the Hon. Secretary of the Monumental Brass Society:

Dr Christian Steer
8 Shefford Lodge Newbury, Berkshire RG14 7LR
e: christianosteer@yahoo.co.uk

Please indicate whether you are a member of the M.B.S. or CMS at booking.
Non-members should enclose a cheque for £15.00 (£5.00 for students) made payable to the Monumental Brass Society.

It is intended to publish a list of delegate names and email addresses. Please indicate at the time of booking whether you do not wish your email address to be included. 

Event: historyLab Plus – History within the Academy: Ask the Experts (London, 27 June 2014)

History within the Academy: Ask the Experts
Friday, 27 June 2014 from 09:15 to 13:30
London, Institute of Historical Research
senate_house

This half day workshop is organised jointly with the Royal Historical Society & History Lab Plus. The workshop is aimed at early career historians and anyone seeking an academic post in history. Those who have recently completed or are about to submit a PhD are particularly welcome.

The event will be informal, with plenty of time to ask questions and to meet the speakers. The discussion will focus on the academic job market, public engagement, open access and looking ahead to REF2020. There will also be chance to raise any other questions or concerns relating to building an academic career in History.

Registration is free but places are strictly limited. Early booking is required. http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/history-within-the-academy-ask-the-experts-tickets-11584755315

For further information, see:
Web: www.history.ac.uk/historylab
Email: ihrhistorylab@googlemail.com
Blog: http://the-history-lab.blogspot.com