International Congress on Medieval 2021: Medieval Art/Architecture related papers & panels, 10 – 15 May, 2021

Whilst the International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS) cannot take place in person, the wonderful committee have organised a virtual conference to take place. We’ve had a look through the programme and have brought together all the Medieval Art related papers and panels.

Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies (9th-14th May 2022), Deadline 18th May 2021

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 9–14, 2022. We invite session proposals on anyContinue reading “Call for Sessions: Mary Jaharis Center Sponsored Panel, 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies (9th-14th May 2022), Deadline 18th May 2021”

CFP: Mary on the Move: Marian Iconography in Late Medieval France, International Congress on Medieval Studies Kalamazoo 2021, deadline 15 September 2020

Session 1363 The proposed session concentrates of Marian iconography of the Late middle Ages, with particular emphasis on fourteenth to sixteenth century. It focuses on the movement of iconographies in/from/towards France by highlighting connections and influences pertaining to Italian, Spanish and/or geographical areas. Furthermore, it situates Marian visual depictions in the context of the developmentContinue reading “CFP: Mary on the Move: Marian Iconography in Late Medieval France, International Congress on Medieval Studies Kalamazoo 2021, deadline 15 September 2020”

CFP: Medieval Ars Memoriae in Italy: Theory, Technique, and Practices at International Congress on Medieval Studies Kalamazoo 2021, deadline 15 September 2020

This panel aims to explore the variety of memory techniques developed and practiced in Italy during the medieval period.

CFP: ‘Behold a Pale Horse’: Eschatology of the Medieval East and West, ICMS 2021, deadline 15 September 2020

This is an interdisciplinary, global, and cross-chronological panel that welcomes papers addressing the interaction of disease and eschatological belief in the medieval world.

CFP: Jerusalem: The Holy City as Interreligious Experience (International Congress on Medieval Studies Kalamazoo 2021), deadline 15 September 2020

Sponsor: Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS), Stanford University Co-Ordinator: Ana Núñez (ananunez@stanford.edu) This panel contributes to conversations that explore Jerusalem as a space of central importance to Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Through critical rereadings of textual accounts and material remains, the papers in this panel will highlight the dynamic ways in which JerusalemContinue reading “CFP: Jerusalem: The Holy City as Interreligious Experience (International Congress on Medieval Studies Kalamazoo 2021), deadline 15 September 2020”

CFP: Identity and Status in Byzantine Material Culture, International Congress on Medieval Studies (13-15 May 2021), deadline 15 September 2020

In addition to written sources like letters, Byzantine material culture provides evidence for identity and status. Coins and seals, textiles and jewelry, and inscriptions and art objects — these objects provide a window on the ways in which individuals and groups at all levels understood and presented themselves and their place in society. Although focusing on objects from Byzantium this panel welcomes speakers working on materials from a comparative perspective.

CFP: Modernity and Lateness in Medieval Architecture, International Congress on Medieval Studies (13-15 May 2021), deadline 15 September 2020

This panel challenges Eurocentric progress models of stylistic change that presuppose a nascent, fully- realized, and late style in architecture. The panel aims to (re)situate the eclectic visual vocabularies of secular and religious buildings from the thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries that are indebted to medieval building practices and designs within the larger and more established narratives of art and architectural history.