Job: Assistant Professor, Architectural history/History of planning and urban design, Bryn Mawr College, USA

bmc_black_stacked2-thumbJob: Assistant Professor, Architectural history/History of planning and urban design, Bryn Mawr College, USA
Start date: August 1, 2017
Deadline: December 5, 2016

The Department of Growth and Structure of Cities at Bryn Mawr College invites applications for a full-time, beginning tenure-track Assistant Professor position in architectural history or the history of planning and urban design to start August 1, 2017. The candidate’s teaching and research interests should focus on the built environment and its relationship to social, economic, political, cultural and aesthetic factors across time and place.  The successful candidate will teach an introductory survey of urban form and develop appropriate intermediate and advanced courses in the field and a course in research methods. A Ph.D. in architectural or planning history or another relevant field is required by the start date.

How to apply: Submit as pdf documents a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching philosophy and research statement by December 5, 2016 to Growth and Structure of Cities Search Committee via Interfolio ByCommittee at: https://apply.interfolio.com/35957.

In addition, arrange for three letters of recommendation to be submitted via Interfolio to the Growth and Structure of Cities Search Committee.

Applications received by December 5, 2016 will receive full consideration.   http://www.brynmawr.edu/provost/open_positions.html#Tenure_track_positions

Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions, MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts, LMU Munich

cover170x170Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions (E13 TV-L, 66%), MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts at LMU Munich funded by the Elite Network of Bavaria, starting 1 April 2017
 Deadline for application: 1 November 2016.
The International Doctoral Program (IDP) MIMESIS is dedicated to innovative doctoral research in the fields of literature and the arts, with special emphasis on historical, theoretical and transdisciplinary perspectives. It will enable cooperation between research projects in literature, theatre, performance, music, film studies, architecture and the visual arts, offering both a forum and a framework in which interests drawn from any one of these areas enter into a dialogue with other areas in the wider spectrum of creative engagements. Its research program is framed by the term mimesis, a key concept throughout the history of the arts, right up to the most recent developments in critical and cultural theory. MIMESIS offers a structured program of doctoral study combining seminars, workshops, lecture series and master classes. In addition internships with leading cultural institutions and at partner universities will be integrated into the study program.
How to Apply: The applicants should hold an excellent/above average master’s degree or equivalent in literature, art history, theatre or film studies or related subjects. The outline of the research project should show an explicit connection to the research profile of the program (i.e. mimesis).
Please use the application tool on this website:
http://portal.graduatecenter-lmu.de/gc-application/
For further information please contact:
mimesis-doc@lmu.de

Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

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Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

Fortnightly Thursdays 17:30, IHR Wolfson II unless noted; free, all welcome

Winter Term
29th September ** Senate House South Block Room 349 (3rd Floor)**
Chris Wickham (Oxford): Jiangnan style: Doing global economic history in the medieval period

13th October
Giorgio Lizzul (KCL): The republic, commerce, and public debt in the forged orations of Doge Tommaso Mocenigo

Kenneth Duggan (KCL): The limits of strong government: Attempts to control criminality in thirteenth-century England

27th October (jointly with History of Liturgy seminar)
Cecilia Gaposchkin (Dartmouth & UCL): Liturgy and devotion in the aftermath of the FourthCrusade: Nivelon of Soissons, the relics of 1204, and the cathedral of Soissons

10th November
Andrew Jotischky (Royal Holloway): The image of the Greek: Western views of orthodox monks and monasteries, c.1000-1500

24th November
Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg): Military expatriation to Muslim lands: Aragonese Christian mercenaries as trans-imperial subjects in the Late Middle Ages

8th December (** Senate House Room 246 **)
Justine Firnhaber-Baker (St Andrews): Who were the Jacques and what did they want? Social networks and community mobilization in the Jacquerie of 1358

Spring Term 2017

18th January (jointly with Earlier Middle Ages Seminar, **time & venue to be confirmed**)
Roundtable discussion of Cathars in Question ed. Antonio Sennis (Boydell & Brewer, 2016)

19th January (** Senate House, The Court Room**)
Sylvain Piron (EHESS): An individual institutionalization: Opicino de Canestris (1296– c.1354)

2nd February
Nicholas Vincent (UEA): Henry II’s Irish colony: Truth and fiction

16th February
Dominique Iogna-Prat (CNRS/EHESS): A stone church? Visibility, monumentality and spatiality of the Medieval Church (500-1500)

2nd March
Ella Kilgallon (QMUL): Visualising castitas in the Franciscan tradition: An analysis of three frescoes from central Italy

Ella Williams (UCL): History and prophecy in Naples: The Faits des Romains at the court of KingRobert ‘the Wise’

16th March
Jonathan Lyon (Chicago): Offices, officials and bureaucracy in late medieval Europe: The view from Germany

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL); IHR page http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/114.

Contact: John Sabapathy & Alice Taylor (j.sabapathy@ucl.ac.uk & alice.taylor@kcl.ac.uk).

Call for Submissions: Revista Digital de Iconografía Medieval

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACall for Submissions: Revista Digital de Iconografía Medieval

The open-access peer-reviewed Revista Digital de Iconografía Medieval seeks articles for publication in one of the journal’s two sections:

  • Monographic studies of iconography: from a general point of view, it will be analyzed a topic or symbol of medieval repertory, either of biblical precedence or apocryphal, mythological, scientific, etc.
  • Transversal studies of iconography: from a specific point of view, it will be analyzed one or several works of art with an iconographical relationship.

Articles for should be sent by email to irgonzal@ghis.ucm.es. The text must be written in Spanish, English or French, in a Word file.
Images, only accepted in JPG, GIF, TIFF, of BMP file, should be attached together with a list of contents including all the information concerning the work of art depicted and the origin of the reproduction.
The work must be original and conform to the rules of publication of the journal, both in extent and in the organization of the content and formal requirements.

For more information and for the journal’s editorial guidelines, click here.

CFPs: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017

tumblr_nid8xdrz0n1soj7s4o4_500Call for Papers: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017
Deadline: October 25, 2016

For more information on panels, round-tables, short presentations and working groups, and for submission guidelines, see: http://rarebookschool.org/bibliography-conference-2017/

Bibliography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference to be held in Philadelphia from 12 to 15 October 2017, will bring together scholarly professionals poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The Bibliography Among the Disciplines program, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations. The conference sessions will include both traditional and innovative formats: plenary addresses, short presentations, roundtables, workshops, working groups, and site visits. Calls for Proposals and Participants (CFPs) are listed below. The project will culminate in 2019 with a volume of essays contributed by conference participants. The conference and subsequent volume will seek to build on the ongoing series of symposia conducted by Rare Book School’s Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, established in 2012 through funding from the Foundation.

Call for Papers- Panels:

Graphic Representation: Illustration & Diagrams
Session Organizers: Claire Eager (University of Virginia), Jeannie Kenmotsu (University of Pennsylvania)

Textual Instruments
Session Organizer: Nick Wilding (Georgia State University)

Questions of Scale, Production & Labor
Session Organizer: Juliet Sperling (University of Pennsylvania)

Transmission & Transfer of Images
Session Organizer: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley

Degradation, Loss, Recovery & Fragmentation
Session Organizer: Jane Raisch (University of California, Berkeley)

Materiality of Digital Objects
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

The Social Life of Books: Uses of Text & Image Beyond Reading & Viewing
Session Organizers: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley), Hannah Marcus (Harvard University), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Books as Agents of Contact
Session Organizers: Hansun Hsiung (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Yael Rice (Amherst College)

Manuscript in the Age of Print
Session Organizers: Rachael King (University of California, Santa Barbara), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation
Session Organizer: Lauren Jennings (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Comparative Histories of the Book
Session Organizers: Megan McNamee (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Reappraising the Redundant: The Value of Copies in the Study of Textual Artifacts
Session Organizer: Kappy Mintie (University of California, Berkeley)n and

Call for Papers – Roundtables:

Performance, Textuality & Orality
Session Organizer: Glenda Goodman (University of Pennsylvania)

Authorship
Session Organizers: András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Digitization, Representation & Access
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

Materiality as a Sustainable Humanistic Discourse
Session Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Ethics & Responsibility in the Bibliosphere
Session Organizer: Claire Eager (University of Virginia)

 Call for papers – Short Presentations:

Tools for Data Analysis & Visualization
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

Innovative Pedagogy with Material Objects
Session Organizer: Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Teaching Global Book History
Session Organizers: Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University) & Ben Nourse (University of Denver)

Dynamics of Digital Collections
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

The Book and Its Time: Developing a ‘Period Eye’
Session Organizer: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Winterthur Museum)

Call for Papers: Working Groups:

Globalizing Book History & Bibliography
Working Group Organizers: Hwisang Cho (Xavier University), Ben Nourse (University of Denver), Rachel Stein (Columbia University in the City of New York)

Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines
Working Group Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Courtney Roby (Cornell University)

 

CFP: Medieval Materialities: Encountering the Material Medieval, St Andrews, School of Art History/St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies, January 19 – 20, 2017

cskf7tovyaa3ku6-jpg_largeCall for Papers: Medieval Materialities: Encountering the Material Medieval, St Andrews, School of Art History/St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies, January 19 – 20, 2017
Deadline: November 15, 2016

The University of St Andrews School of Art History in collaboration
with the St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) present
Encountering the Material Medieval, the second edition of an
interdisciplinary conference on materiality and material engagements
with the medieval, taking place on 19-20 January 2017 in Scotland.

The academic year 2016-2017 looks like it is going to be the year of
modern medievalisms, with three conferences addressing how the medieval
fits into our modern world in the UK, France and the USA. While the
idea of medievalism directly impacts modern scholarship and culture at
large, it encourages an engagement with a theoretical abstraction of
the medieval culture. This way, the materiality of the sources, and the
intrinsic materiality of our embodied engagement with the medieval, is
neglected.

Beyond the digital humanities, we are interested in material
engagements with the medieval. This takes place in the library, where
we encounter manuscripts in an intimate, skin-to-skin contact; during
fieldwork, when we need to crouch in order to enter a medieval altar;
in one’s own kitchen, when we try to reproduce a recipe freshly
transcribed from a manuscript; or on the fairground, where we can hold
in our own hand a replica of medieval pottery.

We are dedicated to encouraging multi-mediality and non-traditional
presentation methods during the conference. Therefore, we invite
interactive presentations, installations and posters, workshop and
hands-on activities proposals (45-50 minutes), as well as papers (not
longer than 20 minutes) on the following range of topics and their
relationship to the study of materiality, physicality and embodiment
in/with the Middle Ages:
– The concept of materiality and physicality as research and teaching
methodology;
– Bringing the materiality of the medieval to the institution or the
wider public;
– Semiotics and anthropology of the material Middle Ages in modern or
medieval thought and practice;
– The human and non-human, material and embodied, materiality and
boundaries;
– Medieval to modern (dis)continuities in genealogy of material.
Papers and workshops on other issues related to the study of
materiality and physicality in the Middle Ages are also welcome.

How to submit: Please send your submissions (250 word abstract) along with a short
biography (max. 100 words) to medmat@st-andrews.ac.uk no later than
15th of November 2016.

For more info, visit our website Medievalmaterialities.wordpress.com
Find us on Twitter: @medievalmateriality and tweeting with #medmat17