Medieval Job! Assistant Professor (fixed term), Christian and medieval archaeology, Ca’ Foscari, Venice

Deadline: 2nd March 2020

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Ca’ Foscari invites applications for a non-tenured position for an Assistant Professor in the area of Christian and medieval archaeology.

Ca’ Foscari is a research intensive institution committed to competing for international scientific excellence through the recruitment of the best academic talents worldwide. Talented young researchers and experienced senior professors make Ca’ Foscari a stimulating environment for career development and research freedom. Our university is committed to research excellence, funding promising researchers and developing international partnerships. As a leading research university, Ca’ Foscari explores cutting-edge research directions across disciplinary boundaries, setting a new agenda designed around six global challenges.

Ca’ Foscari is looking for a researcher in the area of Christian and medieval archaeology capable of inspiring students to become game-changers in their own fields and to make a genuine difference in the world.

The position will be hosted at the Department of Humanities, a center for the development of innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to history, literature, classics, archeology, art and anthropology. The Department has recently received the “Department of Excellence” Award by the Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research. The Excellence Award has allowed the department to receive additional state funding to develop innovative projects on Digital Humanities and Public Humanities, with the aim of setting in motion a cross-contamination process between scientific areas and redefining a new teaching standard.

In the Department of Humanities, Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellows and ERC awardees work together with the permanent faculty, creating a vibrant academic environment.

The Institution

Since its foundation in 1868, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice has been a leader in Economics and Foreign Languages and Cultures. Today, Ca’ Foscari is exploring new frontiers in research, focusing on Climate Change, Digital Humanities, Digital and Social Innovation, and Nanosciences. An intellectual powerhouse of international repute in the heart of the city of Venice, Ca’ Foscari provides a one-of-a-kind blend of scientific research, cultural heritage and history, offering a life-changing experience to its students and researchers, with a transformative impact on the local community.

Ca’ Foscari University of Venice has also obtained the full Human Resources Strategy for Researchers certificate, a set of initiatives to improve work conditions for researchers and to attract talents worldwide. Ca’ Foscari provides applicants with exclusive services and onboarding initiatives. Our Housing office will help you search for a suitable and convenient accommodation, matching your needs and preferences with the available options.

If you are a non-Italian applicant or if you have resided outside of Italy for more than 3 years, you will benefit from a favorable tax treatment for the first 4 years of the contract.

Read the call here: https://intra.unive.it/plapps/bandi/common/showbando?id=32360

Source : Jobs.ac.uk

CFP: ‘WHAT DOES ANIMATION MEAN IN THE MIDDLE AGES? Theoretical and Historical Approaches’, Bialystok, Poland, 17-20 September 2020

Screen Shot 2020-02-17 at 12.46.58International conference in Bialystok, Poland from the 17th-20th September 2020
Deadline: April 30, 2020

Organised by The A. Zelwerowicz National Academy of Dramatic Art Branch Campus in Bialystok, Poland and University of Bergen, Norway

This conference is concerned with the agency and life of material objects and evolves around the investigation of two interlaced objectives. First, the conference will shed light on understudied aspects of medieval visual culture, focusing in particular on the agency of images and material objects. Second, it will provide new cutting-edge theoretical reflections and methodologies concerning the study of material agency and “living images” today. We argue that the cultural use of and interaction with images may be regarded as more than mere historically or culturally specific phenomena. Rather, it concerns the ontology of images and constitutes a fundamental aspect of our life with images, in the premodern as well as in the contemporary. It is our contention that images are embedded in social interaction and that animation is deeply constitutive of the production of meaning. Animation, we argue, is not only located in the mind of the beholder, but in the epistemology, creation, interaction and materiality of images. Furthermore, we will argue that medieval animation may inform contemporary views on animation and provide us with a more precise vocabulary to capture current phenomena for instance in the digital world. The conference aim to be interdisciplinary and transhistorical in its perspective and targets scholars of visual studies, material studies, study of religions, anthropology, medieval studies and theology. It is also relevant more generally for current discussions about the life and agency of seemingly dead matter.

There are four main topics of the conference: – Physical/mechanical animation of artworks and other artefacts (sculptures, reliquaries, paintings etc.) – Mental animations of images and objects (artworks, and other artefacts) – Animation in a theatrical context (mystery plays, liturgical plays and staging’s, puppets and other theatrical use of figures and sculptures) – Medieval and Early Modern animation in the 20th century and contemporary theatrical practices. The conference takes as its point of departure the work of the newly organized international research-project: The Living Image (LIMA): On the ontology, agency and personhood of living images and objects – medieval and modern. This project is coordinated from the University of Bergen, Norway, and consists of a group of researchers from Belgium, Denmark, Ireland, Norway, Poland, United Kingdom, and USA, and the work of the international research network: The European Network on the Instruments of Devotion – ENID: https://enid.w.uib.no/ The conference in Bialystok is designed to be a platform for the exchange of opinions, ideas, and historical documentation, as well as the starting point for a publication. We plan to publish a collection of articles offering an interdisciplinary academic survey of the topic of animation in the Middle Ages, and its reception in the 20th Century.

The language of the conference is English. Each contributor will be given 20 minutes to present his/her paper. Please send abstracts of no longer than 500 words, together with a short CV and personal data at the following email: medievalanimation@gmail.com
Deadline: April 30, 2020

Conference fee: 25 Euros (15 Euros for Ph.D. students)

The conference will take place in Bialystok at the: The A. Zelwerowicz National Academy of Dramatic Art Branch Campus in Białystok (Puppet Theatre Art Department) H. Sienkiewicza 14, 15–092 Białystok, Poland http://www.atb.edu.pl e-mail: sekretariat@atb.edu.pl https://goo.gl/maps/hcfuKHoNqKeqPMSK9

Confirmed key-note speakers are: Peter Dent, Ph.D., University of Bristol, GB; Prof. Cynthia Hahn, The City University of New York, USA; Prof. Hans Henrik Lohfert Jørgensen, University of Aarhus, Denmark; Amy Whitehead, Ph.D., Massey University, New Zealand.

Scientific committee: Henrik von Achen, Professor, Dr. Art., Director of the University Museum, University of Bergen, Norway; Kristin Bliksrud Aavitsland, Professor, Ph.D., MF Norwegian School of Theology, Religion and Society, Norway; Barbara Baert, Professor, Ph.D., Art History, Faculty of Arts, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium; Jørgen Bakke, Associate Professor, Dr. Art., Department of Linguistic, Literary and Aesthetic Studies, University of Bergen, Norway; Carla Maria Bino, Professor, Ph.D., Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Brescia, Italy; Christophe Chaguinian, Associate Professor, Ph.D., College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of North Texas, USA; Peter Dent, Senior Lecturer, Ph.D., Department of History of Art, University of Bristol, Great Britain; Rob Faesen, Professor, Ph.D., Department of History of Church and Theology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium; Cynthia Hahn, Professor, Ph.D., Medieval Art History, Hunter College, The City University of New York, USA; Hans Henrik Lohfert Jørgensen, Associate Professor, School of Communication and Culture – Art History, University of Aarhus, Denmark; Jon P. Mitchell, Professor, Ph.D., Social Anthropology, University of Sussex, Great Britain; David Morgan, Professor, Ph.D., Religious Studies & Art, Art History and Visual Studies, Duke University, USA; Salvador Ryan, Professor, Ph.D., Ecclesiastical History, Pontifical University St Patricks College, Maynooth, Ireland; Zuzanna Sarnecka, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., Institute of Art History, University of Warsaw, Poland; Laura Katrine Skinnebach, Assistant Professor, Ph.D., School of Communication and Culture – Art History, University of Aarhus, Denmark; Allie Terry-Fritsch, Associate Professor, Ph.D., School of Art – Art History, Bowling Green State University, USA

Conference organised by:
Kamil Kopania, Ph.D., The A. Zelwerowicz National Academy of Dramatic Art, Branch Campus in Bialystok, Poland (https://atb.edu.pl/o-wydziale/pedagodzy/dr-kamil-kopania) Henning Laugerud, Associate Professor, Dr. Art., Department of Linguistic, Literary, and Aesthetic Studies, University of Bergen, Norway (https://www.uib.no/en/persons/Henning.Laugerud)

CFP: University of York, Centre for Medieval Studies, Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: Relationships

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Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: Relationships

Date(s): 23-24 June 2020

Location: King’s Manor, Exhibition Square, York

Deadline: 23 April, 2020

We welcome paper proposals of 250-300 words for 15-20 minute papers on the theme of Relationships in any area of Medieval Studies from current postgraduate students (MA, PhD, MPhil), early career scholars, and independent researchers.

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The social intellectual: experience and thought in the Middle Ages

social intelllectual

Thursday, 19 March 2020

9:00am to 7:00pm

The King’s Manor, Exhibition Square

University of York, York, Y01 7EP

This international conference explores the organic relationship between lived experience and academic/religious thought, beginning from the position that intellectual activity and social experience were closely intertwined in the medieval period. The conference honours the work of Professor Peter Biller FBA in his 75th year, whose attempts to situate practical medieval thinkers in their milieux have inspired many of the speakers.

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Church Monuments Society Essay Competition 2020

Mary Magdalene Horton

Alabaster tomb chest with a pair of effigies to Lord William Parr and his wife Mary, d. 1555 daughter of John Salisbury, St. Mary Magdalene, Main Street, Horton, Northamptonshire

The Council of the Church Monuments Society offers a biennial prize of £500 called the Church Monuments Essay Prize, to be awarded with a certificate for the best essay submitted in the relevant year. The aim of the competition is to stimulate people, particularly those who may be writing on church monuments for the first time, to submit material for the peer-reviewed international CMS journal Church Monuments. Therefore, the competition is open only to those who have not previously published an article in Church Monuments.

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Book launch for ‘Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation’, 6.30-8pm, Weds 12 February, Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Please join us for the launch of Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation, eds Tom Nickson and Nicola Jennings: https://courtauld.ac.uk/event/gothic-architecture-in-spain-invention-and-imitation-book-launch 

6.30pm, Research Forum South Room, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, London WC1X 9EW

From the dazzling spectacle of Burgos Cathedral to the cavernous nave of Palma Cathedral or the lacy splendour of San Juan de los Reyes, Spain preserves a remarkable variety of inventive but little understood Gothic buildings. Yet Gothic architecture in Spain and the Spanish kingdoms has traditionally been assessed in terms of its imitation of northern European architecture, dismissed for its ‘old-fashioned’ or provincial quality, and condemned for its passive receptivity to ‘Islamic influence’. But did imitation really triumph over invention in the architecture of medieval Iberia? Are the two incompatible? Can inventio and imitatio offer useful or valid analytical tools for understanding Gothic architecture? And to what extent are invention or imitation determined by patrons, architects, materials or technologies? This essay collection brings together leading scholars to examine Gothic architecture from across Iberia from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century, and provides the first significant account of Spanish Gothic architecture to be published in English since 1865.

The launch directly follows a Medieval Work-in-Progress Seminar by Beate Fricke, ‘Colour and Chaos’, starting at 5pm in the same room. Attendance is free and all are welcome to attend. Details here: https://courtauld.ac.uk/event/colour-and-chaos

CFP: ‘Remarkable women’: Female patronage of religious institutions, 1350-1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 4 June 2020

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Call for Papers: ‘Remarkable women’: Female patronage of religious institutions, 1350-1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 4 June 2020. This conference is organised by Nicholas Flory and hosted by Prof Susie Nash.

Deadline: Friday 10 April 2020

This conference seeks to explore the ways in which women patronised and interacted with monasteries and religious houses during the late Middle Ages, how they commissioned devotional and commemorative art for monastic settings, and the ways in which these donations were received and understood by their intended audiences. The artistic donations of lay patrons to religious institutions has become a fruitful area of study in recent years, but the specific role played by women in these networks of patronage has been subject to less thorough scrutiny. Similarly too, the interests of female patrons have often been considered separately from the contexts of the places to which they made their donations, without a thorough consideration of their very different status from their male counterparts and how this shaped their pursuit for commemoration and memorial after death and their reception as patrons by monastic houses and religious institutions.

Applicants are encouraged to consider these issues and to think about the placement of objects and works of art commissioned by women within religious buildings, the devotional practices and beliefs of various religious orders, the physical materials of donations, and the ways in which female patrons situated themselves within monastic spaces. Was there a dialogue between these benefactors and the religious institutions they patronised? What can such donations tell us about the role and position of women in late medieval society and the ways in which they used religious patronage to articulate their own status? By examining a category of patrons that was clearly highly aware of a variety of devotional and commemorative practices, this conference seeks to gain a better understanding of art commissioned for monasteries by female lay donors, and how this more broadly reflects the position of women in late-medieval Europe.

Proposals are encouraged to address these issues throughout Europe between circa 1350 to 1550. Topics might include, but are not limited to considerations of:

  • Issues of access and entry for women into religious spaces
  • The agency of women in donating to monastic orders
  • The significance of widowhood
  • How women made themselves present, either in images of burial, in spaces often unavailable to them in life.
  • The relationships between a female patron and a male religious institution.
  • The role of materials in articulating identity or expressing specific aims, ideas or associations
  • The differences in donations, and their reception, between male and female patrons
  • The positioning of chapels, memorials or objects within monastic spaces
  • How concepts of death and the afterlife may have been expressed in visual terms, and the ways in which this may have been gendered.
  • The political nature of female patronage, and the ways in which women contributed to dynastic or familial ambitions
  • How different monastic orders may have received and understood female patronage
  • The types of object given by female donors to monastic audiences

Proposals are welcome from postgraduate, early-career and established researchers working in all relevant disciplines. Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a short CV and 100-word biography, to Nicholas.Flory@courtauld.ac.uk, by Friday 10 April 2020.

We hope to be able to provide some financial support for travel and accommodation for speakers who require it, but applicants are encouraged to first apply to their home institution for any necessary support. This conference is made possible by the kind generosity of Sam Fogg.