Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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Conference: Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean, Granada, 13-14 November 2017

p05d1gkgConference: Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean, Palacio de Carlos V – Alhambra, Granada, 13-14 November 2017
Registration deadline: Nov 8, 2017

Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean: between East and West
2nd International Workshop of the ArtMedGIS Project

Free registration open until 8th November 2017 at: mmcobaleda@ugr.es; mmcobaleda@fcsh.unl.pt; iem.geral@fcsh.unl.pt

The aim of this International Workshop is to establish an exchange opportunity to analyse the cultural legacy of the Western Islamic societies from different and complementary perspectives.
To achieve this aim, a double objective has been proposed: to create a space for dialogue in order to share recent research results, as well as to establish new research networks integrated by experienced and young researchers thus allowing for the development of interdisciplinary research lines on the late Middle Ages.
Within this general framework, the main goal will be to analyse the Islamic cultural legacy in a comprehensive approach, from the multidisciplinary fields of History of Art, Architecture, History, Archaeology, Philosophy, Music and History of Religions.

PROGRAMME

Monday, 13th November 2017

9:45 Registration

10:00 Opening Session

10:15 Lecture
La Alhambra en el contexto del arte islámico
Juan Carlos RUIZ SOUZA (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

Session 1: The Western Islamic Legacy

11:15
El legado Omeya: Córdoba y el Imperio Almohade
Rafael BLANCO GUZMÁN (LAAC-EEA-CSIC – Universidad de Córdoba)

11:45 Coffee break

12:15
El viaje de la Sebka almohade a través del Mediterráneo Medieval
Dolores VILLALBA SOLA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

12:45
La culture matérielle des élites mérinides : vêtements et regalia comme emblèmes politiques (XIIIe-XVe s.)
Yassir BENHIMA (Université Paris III – Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris)

13:15
Aportaciones desde el Reino Nazarí de Granada a la configuración de la cuentística mediterránea del s. XV
Desirée LÓPEZ BERNAL (UGR, Granada)

13:45 Lunch

17:00 Lecture
La Zoraya como mecenas: el programa ornamental del palacio de “Daralhorra”. Nuevas propuestas
Cynthia ROBINSON (Cornell University)

18:00 Coffee break

18:15
Los bienes habices en la Granada del siglo XVI: pervivencia de una institución islámica en el Occidente cristiano
Ana María CARBALLEIRA DEBASA  (EEA – CSIC, Granada)

Session 2: The Arts between East and West

18:45
Arte y ciencia en al-Andalus y el Mediterráneo bajomedieval: astrolabios almohades, nazaríes y ayyubíes en contexto
Azucena HERNÁNDEZ (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

19:15
Modelos orientales en la producción textil andalusí
Laura RODRÍGUEZ PEINADO (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

Tuesday, 14th November 2017

10:00 Lecture
Los ‘best-sellers’ de al-Andalus: recepción y valoración en el pasado y el presente
Maribel FIERRO (CCHS – CSIC, Madrid)

11:00
Spolia y revivals clásicos en los discursos de legitimidad: de Córdoba a las mezquitas mamelucas de El Cairo
Susana CALVO CAPILLA (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

11:30
Eboraria sículo-normanda, andalusí y fatimí: transferencias iconográficas y propaganda visual
Noelia SILVA SANTA-CRUZ (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

12:00 Coffee break

Session 3: Jews, Muslims and Christians: Three Religions and One Culture

12:30
Hacia una lectura global de los fenómenos epigráficos mediterráneos al final     de la Edad Media
Vincent DEBIAIS (CESCM – CNRS, Poitiers)
Morgan UBERTI (Université Bordeaux Montaigne)

13:00
Rex Tyrannus or a self-aware Monarch? The fatimids influences on Roger II’s culture of power
Francesco Paolo TOCCO (University of Messina)

13:30
Dance, Music and Clothes: Distinctive Signs and Intercultural Relationships between East and West in Italian and Spanish Paintings during the first half of the 14th century
Maria PORTMANN (Conservator of the Historic Monuments in the Canton of the Valais, Switzerland)

14:00 Lunch

17:00
The impact of Sufism on Jewish Mysticim and its possible influence on Kabbalah
Dora ZSOM (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)

17:30
Jews and rabbis at the court of Mehmet the Conqueror according to Eliyyahu Capsali’s Seder Eliyyahu Zuta
Francesca Valentina DIANA (University of Bologna)

18:00 Coffee break

18:20 Closing lecture:
Relaciones artísticas entre Oriente y Occidente: el Proyecto ArtMedGIS
María MARCOS COBALEDA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

Scientific direction and coordination:
María MARCOS COBALEDA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

Organization:
ArtMedGIS Project (MSCA – H2020, No 699818)
Instituto de Estudos Medievais (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)
In collaboration with:
Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife
Universidad de Granada (UGR, Granada)

Deadline Extended: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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CFP: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018, Bloomington, Indiana

5487225791_f2f9dd3b91Call for Papers: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018,

Keynote: Elizabeth Allen, University of California, Irvine

The Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University invites proposals for its 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, April 6-7, 2018, in Bloomington, Indiana

Iron maidens, the Inquisition, the Crusades, witch burnings: these images of violence, both fact and fiction, are profoundly connected to the Middle Ages. Yet if in many popular conceptions, the medieval world is associated with brutality and suffering, the period also offers unique formulations of mercy, compassion, and the power of resistance. In exploring both medieval violence or nonviolence, this symposium seeks to examine specific structures of power and brutality but also to complicate the narrative of the violent Middle Ages.

We invite papers on any medieval discipline or region that engage issues of medieval violence and nonviolence: What functions did violence serve in the Middle Ages? How might acts of physical and rhetorical violence against othered groups (gendered, religious, cultural, racial, nonhuman) reflect larger concerns or anxieties within medieval culture? Is there a medieval aesthetic of violence? How does medieval music, art, theology, and literature glorify or critique brutality and/or suffering? How do medieval texts understand the uses and effects of verbal violence? How might medieval violence operate in a metaphorical sense, as violence done to texts or to the material past? What does nonviolence look like in the Middle Ages? Given the functions and pervasiveness of violence, what are some ways in which it is resisted and negotiated? What alternatives do medieval people or institutions offer to violence? How might medieval understandings of mercy or love act as a counter to violence? We also encourage papers on modern representations of the Middle Ages that consider to what extent and to what ends these medievalisms employ violence and nonviolence.

We are also excited to announce that graduate students whose papers have been accepted for the symposium are invited to submit their papers by March 2, 2018 to be considered for the IU Medieval Studies Symposium Paper Prize. Papers will be evaluated by a panel of IU medieval faculty. The prize of $250 will be awarded before the symposium to help defray the cost of travel, and the winner will be noted in the program.

Please submit 200 word abstracts or complete sessions proposals to IUMestSymposium@gmail.com by November 24, 2017.

Conference: Shaping the Officer. Communities and Practices of Accountability in Premodern Europe, German Historical Institute London, 8-10 November 2017

kings_courtConference: Shaping the Officer. Communities and Practices of Accountability in Premodern Europe, German Historical Institute London, 8-10 November 2017

Convenors: María Ángeles Martín Romera (LMU Munich), Hannes Ziegler (GHI London)

Interactions between subjects and rulers have been studied in a wide range of historiographical approaches. Among them, the question of officers’ accountability has been of particular interest as a fundamental field for the analysis of rule and authority in premodern Europe. While recent research has attributed to communities a more active role in defining these interactions, they are still mostly portrayed as reacting to inputs from above. Even in recent approaches on ‘state-building from below’ or in more specific concepts such as ‘empowering interactions’, local populations are depicted as either posing resistance or participating in an arena conceded to them.

Officers’ accountability is the main focal point of our conference since it is a privileged field to analyse these phenomena. However, instead of thinking of communities as essentially reactive agents, we would like to look at how communities actively modelled the officers’ behaviour, shaped institutions – understood as including formal and informal practices –, and thus established both their own and the officers’ actual scope of action. We are especially interested in the various ways local populations engaged in holding officers accountable, both through regular and extraordinary procedures as well as through everyday interactions with office holders.

How to attend: A limited number of places are available for this conference. To register your interest in attending, please email Carole Sterckx (sterckx(ghi)ghil.ac.uk) by 1 November stating your affiliation and reason for attending.

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

CFP: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018

smrs_logo_emailCall for Papers: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018
Deadline: December 31

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation on all topics and in all disciplines of the medieval and early modern worlds.

The Symposium is held on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University, hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. On-campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned dormitory rooms and a luxurious boutique hotel.

The plenary speakers for this year will be Geoffrey Parker, of The Ohio State University, and Carole Hillenbrand, of the University of St Andrews.

For more information, click here.