CFP: In Search of Crusader Art: Current Approaches and New Perspectives, 4th Forum Medieval Art, Berlin, 20-23 September 2017.

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 12.07.31CFP: In Search of Crusader Art: Current Approaches and New Perspectives, 4th Forum Medieval Art, Berlin, 20-23 September 2017.
Organizer: Ioanna Christoforaki (Athens)
Deadline: 31 October 2016

Although the concept of crusader art is effortlessly understood by scholars, its precise definition is notoriously elusive. Crusader art has traditionally been described as the figural art and architecture produced for the Crusaders in the Holy Land. The patrons were men and women, laymen as well as clergymen, who arrived to the Holy Land as pilgrims, soldiers, settlers, rulers, or merchants, while the artists were Franks and Italians who were residents in the Outremer, Westerners who travelled to the Latin East, or Eastern Christians who worked for Crusader patrons.
In recent decades, however, this conventional definition of crusader art has been challenged. Since it sits on the boundaries of many artistic traditions, its borders have become more porous. The centres of production have shifted beyond the Holy Land, to include places like Cyprus. From Sinai to Cilician Armenia, multifold artistic traditions have converged and numerous people have interacted in the production of what is recognised as crusader art.
The aim of this session is to reflect critically on the limitations of terminology, while addressing issues of artistic transmission across the fluid borderland of the Medieval Mediterranean. It will seek to expand the cultural dialogue between the various religious and ethnic groups in the Eastern Mediterranean, by examining how Islamic, Syrian and Jewish artistic traditions interacted with the Byzantine and Western paradigms. It will attempt to identify the varied forms of crusader art that have emerged in recent years and explore how this revised corpus of crusader material challenges accepted notions. Finally, it will inquire whether crusader art, as an essentially transcultural contact zone, acted as an agent of separation, communication, or convergence.
This session invites papers which re-evaluate traditional approaches to crusader art, artefacts and architecture and seek to re-examine the interplay between material culture, patrons and artists. Participants are expected to explore the artistic interaction between the different ethnic groups in the region and are encouraged to explore a novel approach in defining the notion of crusader art.

How to submit: Paper proposals of max. 1 paper are due by 31 October 2016. Send proposals at mail@mittelalterkongress.de

For more information, click here.

Conference: Fatimids and Umayyads: Competing Caliphates, The Institute of Ismaili Studies, London, 23-25 September 2016

Relations between the Fatimid caliphate and its neighbour and opponent, the Umayyad caliphate of al-Andalus constitute a field of study that merits careful and extensive consideration. Scholarship has tended to study both dynasties separately and the existing entanglements between the two caliphates have been noted, albeit briefly, in a number of academic publications.

The project Fatimids and Umayyads: Competing Caliphates endeavours to place both dynasties in context by creating an academic forum in which to reflect upon and illustrate the processes and mechanisms of interaction, and also to explore and problematise the existence of crosspollination. Various scenarios (historical, social, intellectual, economic, legal, theological, religious, cultural, technical, visual, and artistic) are considered in order to assess affinities, as well as discrepancies, connections and contrasts with regard to how these shaped the Fatimid impact on Umayyad dominions and vice versa.

Contact Info:

For more information, you may email Ms Naushin Shariff (assistant of Dr Omar Ali-de-Unzaga, Deputy Head, Dept. of Academic Research and Publications, IIS

Contact Email:

Conference: Greek Manuscripts in the British Library, British Library Conference Centre, September 19, 2016

greek_day_and_eveningConference: Greek Manuscripts in the British Library, British Library Conference Centre, September 19, 2016

Click here for the Conference Programme

To mark the completion of the third phase of the Greek Manuscripts Digitisation Project and the launch of the Greek Manuscripts Online web resource, the British Library is hosting a one-day conference devoted to Greek Manuscripts on 19 September, 2016. Confirmed participants include Sebastian Brock (Oxford), Charalambos Dendrinos (Royal Holloway), Elizabeth Jeffreys (Oxford), Charlotte Roueché (King’s College London), Maria Georgopoulou (Gennadius Library, Athens) and Giorgi Parpulov (Plovdiv, Bulgaria). Speakers will discuss a variety of topics related to the Library’s digitised Greek collections, such as Greek-Syriac palimpsests, Byzantine illuminated manuscripts, Greek written culture and the digital humanities and the cultural interactions between Greece and Britain.

The conference will be accompanied by an evening lecture by Michael Wood on ‘The Wisdom of the Greeks’. Michael will be looking at how the legacy of Greece and Byzantium in science, religion and literature was transmitted to the Latin West. Fascinating stories about texts and ideas, scribes and scholars will come to life in the course of this illustrated talk that will include Anglo-Saxon kings, Crusader knights and Renaissance humanists – and even a well-known Elizabethan dramatist!

Please book your place in advance and register online at http://www.bl.uk/events/greek-manuscripts-in-the-british-library-day-ticket .

PhD Funding Opportunity: SAHGB Scholarship, 2016-2017

The SAHGB inviteslogo_400x400 applications for a PhD Scholarship for this coming academic year, 2016/17.
Deadline: September 19, 2016.

SAHGB Scholars receive £13,500 p.a. and free membership of the Society whilst in receipt of the award. The only restriction on applicants is that they must be studying full-time at a United Kingdom university, or intending to study full-time, but they can apply at any stage of their research when scholarships are advertised. Part-time students, or those considering part-time study, are acceptable on condition they register for full-time study upon receipt of the award.

The scholarship is tenable a maximum of three years, renewable subject to satisfactory academic performance and to the Society’s finances. Funding will be directed to students on the basis of recognised financial need as well as merit. Applicants should not be in receipt of any other award, but exceptional cases will be considered.

The full Terms & Conditions of the PhD Scholarships can be found here.
How to Apply:
Applicants must submit, along with an online form on our website, the following:
·      A copy of their current CV
·      An outline of their research (max 750 words)
·      A covering letter stating reasons for application
·      Two references in support of the application

Further information on how to submit this information can be found on the Society’s website,where previous scholarship holder’s research areas are also outlined.

Questions concerning the scholarship may be directed to the Society’s Education Officer.

New Exhibition: Visions of Jerusalem: Medieval Christendom Imagines the City on a Hill @Les Enluminures, New York, September 16-November 12, 2016

enluminures to delete.pngLes Enluminures is pleased to present Visions of Jerusalem: Medieval Christendom Imagines the City on a Hill. The exhibition explores the representation of the Holy City in the images and imaginations of the Latin West and the rich diversity of its representation in both word and picture. It is conceived to coincide with the major inter-
national exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jerusalem 1000-1400, Every People Under Heaven, which scrutinizes through a much broader lens the impact Jerusalem had on the many cultural traditions that hold it dear: Eastern, Western, African, Jewish, Muslim, Christian, each with multiple identities and denominations.

Far from inspiring a consistent Christian conception of the Holy City, we show how Jerusalem prompted a vast range of depictions by Western authors and artists. In a time before cameras, images of Jerusalem were less concerned with veracity than with the power of their associations. The versatility of the Holy Land allowed it to act not only as the mise en scène for the Church’s rich biblical-mystical tradition, but also as a virtual destination for spiritual pilgrims and a touchstone in medieval apocalyptic traditions, among others. These varying visions of Jerusalem exemplify the fascinating complexity of the city. In the medieval mind, Jerusalem was both heavenly and earthly. It was a physical location and a mental construction that offered a link to the past and a harbinger of the future.

Highlights of the exhibition include a miniature depicting the Agony in the Garden from the Holy Land Choir Book, the long lost first volume of the Bible of Louis de Harcourt, Patriarch of Jerusalem and Bishop of Bayeux, a beautifully illustrated early gothic copy of Peter of Poitiers’ geneological scroll, and a deluxe book of hours with miniatures attributed to the Workshop of the Master François.

Place:
LES ENLUMINURES
23 East 73rd Street, 7th Floor, Penthouse, New York, NY 10021

Dates:
September 16th through November 12th, 2016

Hours:
Tuesday to Saturday, 10am – 6pm

Contact information:
Adrienne Albright / +1 212 717 7273 / newyork@lesenluminures.com

BAA Lectures: 2016-2017 Programme

logomaneyBAA Lectures, 2016-2017 Programme : Society of Antiquaries of London, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE, 4.30 p.m. (tea)/5.00 p.m (lecture)

5 OCTOBER 2016* – ‘Miraculous Ground Plans and the Liturgy of Building Sites in Late Medieval Italy’ by Dr Lucy Donkin, University of Bristol (The lecture will be preceded by the Association’s Annual General Meeting.)

2 NOVEMBER 2016 – ‘Architecture and Landscape at Restormel Castle, Cornwall’ by Dr Jeremy Ashbee, English Heritage

7 DECEMBER 2016* – ‘Monuments in Wax: Form and Function in Medieval Charters’ by Dr Jessica Barenbeim, Magdalen College, Oxford

4 JANUARY 2017 – ‘The Great English Medieval Bridges: Designs and Functions.’ by Dr David Harrison, International Bridges Group (The lecture will be followed by the Association’s Twelfth-Night Party)

1 FEBRUARY 2017* – ‘When is a Cathedral not a Cathedral? Typologies of Secular and Monastic in the English Great Church.’ by Jon Cannon, University of Bristol

1 MARCH 2017, ‘The Medieval Glazing of Westminster Abbey: New Discoveries’ by Professor Richard Marks and Laura Atkinson, University of Cambridge and Canterbury Cathedral Stained Glass Studio

5 APRIL 2017 – “See God Face to Face; Pray for the King’: The Late Medieval Painted Glass of Winchester Cathedral c1495-c1515’ by Anya Heilpern, University of York

3 MAY 2017* – ‘The Late Medieval Master Mason as Manager; a New Assessment based on a Systematic Analysis of the English Cathedral Fabric Rolls’ by Christopher Paterson, University of Oxford (The lecture will be followed by the President’s Reception)

NB: Council meetings will precede the meetings on dates marked with an asterisk (*).
Non-members are welcome to attend occasional lectures, please sign the visitors’ book on arrival.

CFP: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017

logomaneyCall for Papers: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017
Deadline: Friday 23 rd September

After a successful outing to the Leeds IMC this summer where the BAA hosted two sessions, the BAA welcomes proposals for further BAA organised sessions next year (July 3 rd -6 th 2017). The IMC’s research theme for 2017 is “Otherness” which I think could be interpreted very successfully by the BAA’s members and relate well to research incorporating material culture.
“Other” could refer to those who are deemed to be other in society (strangers, foreigners, monsters); objects that are unusual, or out of the norm, and could therefore be considered as ‘other’; case studies that do not conform to type; and even topics concerning what is culturally “other” (such as artistic, architectural, and literature styles).
Approaches to this topic could include how “other” is encountered and responded to, or how ‘other’ can be defined and identified.

Suggested topics from the IMC include:
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
Full details of the IMC and their interpretation of ‘other’ and other topic suggestions can be found here:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125137/international_medieval_congress

It is hoped that the BAA can organise several sessions once again, with similar papers grouped together (either methodologically or by subject). Therefore if you do have any ideas about colleagues whose research would complement your own paper, please do include such comments along with your paper’s proposal.

How to Submit: Proposals should consist of a title, and short abstract (50-150 words). Please send paper proposals to hpmahood@gmail.com by Friday 23 rd September. If you have any questions, please do get in touch.