Tag Archives: Medieval art

CFP: Concealment and Revelation in the Art of the Middle Ages (Nicosia, 22-24 september 2017)

arnolfo-di-cambio-tomb-of-cardinal-de-braye-detail-11International Conference:  Concealment and Revelation in the Art of the Middle Ages

Nicosia, 22-24 September 2017

CFP Deadline:  30 April 2017

 ‘To reveal art and conceal the artist is art’s aim’ – thus Oscar Wilde in his aphoristic Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891). In the western intellectual tradition, art has repeatedly been conceived and understood as existing at the intersection of the antithetical notions of concealment and revelation – from the old unattributed adage that ‘it is true art to conceal art’ (ars est celare artem) to Robert Rauschenberg’s lapidary statement about the ability of a work of art to reveal something beyond itself (‘A light bulb in the dark cannot show itself without showing you something else too’, scribbled in pencil on the photo collage entitled Random Order, c. 1963). Veiled or unveiled, obscured or illuminated, opaque or transparent, works of art are often invested with meaning(s) and function(s) at the liminal moment of transition from the one state to the next; after all, to resort again to Wilde’s witty prose, ‘the commonest thing is delightful, if one only hides it’.

Recent scholarship on medieval art has brought such considerations to the fore, by tackling issues of screening, veiling / unveiling, temporal and performative transformations, the permeability of barriers and the movement of objects in space, among others. The visibility of sacred relics and their reliquaries, the metal revetments and textile curtains of miracle-working icons, the folding wings of northern European altarpieces, the parting womb of the Vierges ouvrantes or Schreinmadonnen and the porosity of choir screens East and West have all received fairly extensive treatment in monographic studies and specialist articles. Nevertheless, the juxtaposition of these individual phenomena within a broader framework, encompassing both the religious and secular sphere, as well as several different religious traditions, has only seldom been attempted.

The present conference aspires to explore the role of the concept and the act of concealment and revelation in the arts of the Latin West, Byzantium, Islam and Judaism in the course of the Middle Ages (defined chronologically as c. 500-c. 1500). Subjects to be broached include, but are not limited to, the use of curtains or veils in screening objects or spaces; the function of permeable screens (in a variety of materials and media) in structuring accessibility, whether physical, visual, aural or spiritual; the performative aspect of concealing and revealing in all its civic and private manifestations, and the issues of emotional manipulation thereby raised; the role of gesture and spatial motion in the performance of concealment and revelation; the hierarchy of sacred and secular space as the outcome of its compartmentalisation; and the representation of these practices in the pictorial arts.

The conference is planned as a three-day event, to take place at the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus, Nicosia, in 22-24 September 2017. Due to budgetary constraints, the speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses cannot be covered, but every effort will be made to secure conference rates at hotels near the conference venue. There is no registration fee for participation or attendance.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit electronically a title and a 300-word abstract (in either English or Greek) for consideration by 30 April 2017. Please send all materials and address all queries to the conference convenors, Michalis Olympios (olympios.michalis@ucy.ac.cy) and Maria Parani (mparani@ucy.ac.cy).

Department of Medieval Studies at Central European University (Budapest)

Saint_Matthew2CEU provides a variety of merit-based SCHOLARSHIPS AND VARIOUS OTHER TYPES OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT available to students from any country (tuition waiver, stipend, housing awards, health insurance coverage).
Please visit: http://www.ceu.edu/financialaid [1].

FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS who are interested in our programs, CEU organizes an INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE IN AUGUST 2017 at which undergraduate students are more than welcome to participate. For more information please visit http://medievalstudies.ceu.edu/events [2]. For the video about the previous undergraduate conference “Faith and Power”
held on August 4-7, 2016, please see:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xjo6eDmfZEo [3].

CEU attend a number of graduate fairs throughout the year to meet prospective students around the globe, the fairs are listed here:
https://www.ceu.edu/admissions/find-out-more/meet-with-us [4].

You and your students can find further details about our programs at http://medievalstudies.ceu.edu/ [5] and we would be glad to give you more information. It is also possible to like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ceu.med.stud/?fref=ts [6] and to LEARN ABOUT EVENTS, NEWS AND OTHER OPPORTUNITIES inside and outside CEU Medieval Studies.

An OPEN HOUSE event is held in Budapest on NOVEMBER 18, 2016 where candidates can talk to students, staff and faculty members. Prospective students may visit classes and enjoy the international atmosphere of our university during the Open Week (date to be announced).

Cambridge Medieval Art Seminar Series: Craft, Process, Techne

medieval-seminars-2016The University of Cambridge Senior Seminar in Medieval Art meets every other week during full term, attracting an impressive range of speakers from home and abroad.

The Department of the History of Art is pleased to announce the programme for the annual Medieval Art Seminar Series 2016-17. The seminars will explore ideas of craft and process in medieval art at practical and theoretical levels.

Papers (and in one case, a trip to the V&A) will be held on alternating Mondays during Michaelmas and Lent terms and the final two papers of our series will be held in Easter term. The venue for the seminars is Lecture Room 2 of the History of Art Department (1-5 Scroope Terrace, Cambridge CB2 1PX), beginning promptly at 5.30pm. Following questions, attendees are invited to stay and speak more informally with speakers over wine and light nibbles. Lectures are free and open to the public.

Organisers: Robert Hawkins, Amy Jeffs

Please email Robert Hawkins at rh540@cam.ac.uk with any queries.

Programme:

Monday 10th October

Zoe Boden (Victoria and Albert Museum & University of Glasgow)

Opus Anglicanum and the Steeple Aston Cope

Monday 24th October

Group visit to the Opus Anglicanum Exhibition, meet 1.45pm at the V&A

Monday 7th November

Dr George Younge (University of York)

Anglo-Saxon sources of the Theological Windows at Canterbury Cathedral

Monday 21st November

Prof Richard Sennett (LSE and NYU)

The Craftsman: a Discussion

Monday 23rd January

Dr Lucy Wrapson (University of Cambridge, HKI)

Thomas Gooch and Thomas Loveday, two Suffolk Carpenters and their Rood Screens

Monday 6th February

Anya Burgon (University of Cambridge)

The Mechanical Arts in Twelfth-Century School Poetry

Monday 20th February

Dr Peter Dent (University of Bristol)

‘Domine dio fece scolpire questa croce’: Carving the Crucifix in Late Medieval Italy

Monday 27th February

Prof Tim Ingold (University of Aberdeen)

The Craft of Spinning

Monday 6th March

Dr Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Gothic Encounters? Architectural History, Phenomenology and the Gothic Church

Monday 1st May

Prof Susan Rankin (University of Cambridge)

Writing sound : Designing Notation : Carolingian Musical Techne

Monday 15th May

Agata Gomolka (University of East Anglia)

Carving Romanesque Chiaroscuro

 

Exhibition: A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe

October 16, 2016 through January 8, 2017

Walters Presents A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe

Features more than 100 objects from world-renowned collections

Baltimore, MD – The Walters Art Museum presents A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe, a major international loan exhibition that brings together more than 100 works including stained glass, precious metals, ivories, tapestries, paintings, prints, and illuminated manuscripts from 25 public and private collections in the U.S. and abroad, including the Walters’ extraordinary medieval collection. On view from October 16, 2016 through January 8, 2017A Feast for the Senses explores how medieval works of art spoke to all the senses. Luminous stained glass windows, tapestries depicting fragrant gardens, chalices used in the Eucharist—these objects were not only seen, but were also, and at the same time, touched, smelled, tasted, and heard. The Walters is first of only two venues to host this extraordinary exhibition. Admission is free.

During the late medieval period—roughly the 12th to 15th centuries—religious and secular life mingled to the point that the boundaries between them become hard to distinguish: the delights of life and anticipation of heavenly reward were closely intertwined. The arts of the time reflect a new interest in human experience, the enjoyment of nature, and the pursuit of pleasure by evoking and celebrating beauty through all of the senses. While such pleasures were not directed exclusively toward spiritual enlightenment, religious practices were also defined by rich sensory experiences.

The exhibition evokes these not only through the works of art on view but also through specially designed sensory experiences, ranging from smells of roses and incense to the sounds of church bells and gardens, and the tactility of rosary beads.

“In many museums today, visitors experience the artworks by viewing them from afar in silent galleries. A Feast for the Senses will push the boundaries of the art museum by inviting visitors to encounter art with more than just their eyes,” says exhibition curator Martina Bagnoli (former Walters’ curator of medieval art, who is now executive director of the Gallerie Estensi in Modena, Italy).

Loans and Support 

More than 25 museums and collections in the United States and abroad are lending works to the exhibition, including the British Museum, London; the Musée du Louvre, Paris; the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris; the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. The exhibition also includes masterpieces from the Walters’ renowned collection of medieval art, one of the most important in the United States

A Feast for the Senses has been organized by the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, in partnership with the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, and will be on view at the Ringling February 4 through April 20, 2017.

The exhibition received major funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor; the Institute of Museum and Library Services; the National Endowment for the Arts; and anonymous donors, with additional support from the Gary Vikan Exhibition Fund, Nanci and Ned Feltham, and the Helen Hughes Trust. The accompanying catalogue was made possible by an anonymous donor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, or the National Endowment for the Arts.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Accompanying Publication

A generously illustrated catalogue presents new research in the developing field of sensory perception within art history. It includes essays by leading scholars exploring the themes of the exhibition through representations of religious practices, royal rituals, feasts and celebrations, and music and literature. Edited by exhibition curator Martina Bagnoli, the catalogue is published by the Walters Art Museum and distributed by Yale University Press. It is available for sale in the Walters Art Museum Store and online ($65, hardcover) beginning in mid-October.

Opening Day Event

A public opening day talk Symposium on the Senses in Medieval Culture will be held Sunday, October 16 at 1:30 p.m. Exhibition curator Martina Bagnoli, Walters’ in-house curator Joaneath Spicer, and other scholars will explore aspects of the role played by sensory perception in medieval culture that are both surprising and completely familiar to us today. A reception and book signing follow. Tickets are $10, and free for Walters members.

 

CfP: Bodies in flux: Rewriting the Body in Medieval Literature, Art, and Culture 1000-1450, University of Warwick, 20th May 2017,

bodies-in-fluxDeadline for abstract submission: 15th December 2016

 

Keynote Speakers: Dr Miranda Griffin (St Catharine’s College, Cambridge), Dr Robert Mills (UCL), Dr Debra Strickland (University of Glasgow)

 What is it to have a body? And to experience change and transformation through that body?

This interdisciplinary conference asks what the transformation of the body means for the conception of bodies of different kinds: human, nonhuman, animal, material, divine, and how the representation of these changes in different media reflects on and inflects the boundaries conventionally associated with the body. We are inviting abstracts from graduate students and early career researchers from all disciplines. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

 metamorphosis – boundaries between species – boundaries between materials – volatile matter – changing forms – spiritual bodies – transubstantiation – transforming saints – vulnerable bodies – death, illness, injury – medical transformations – bodily miracles – translating bodies – bodies in text and image – allegory and symbolism – transforming meaning

 Please submit abstracts of 250 words to warwickbodiesinflux@gmail.com by 15th December 2016. We look forward to hearing from you!

For more information, visit: www.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/hrc/confs/bif/

Seminar: The Digital Pilgrim Project 19th October 2016

another-medieval-pilgirm-badgePlease join us at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art on the evening of the 19th October. The seminar will discuss the Digital Pilgrim Project and the art historical/museological potential of digital technologies.

http://www.paul-mellon-centre.ac.uk/whats-on/forthcoming/digital-pilgrim-project

The Digital Pilgrim Project is digitising the British Museum’s collection of medieval badges and 3D imaging a selection. The 3D scans are making these miniature objects of art publicly accessible, in some cases for the first time since their acquisition.

Presentations will be followed by discussion.

Our 3D scans can be seen here: https://sketchfab.com/britishmuseum/collections/digital-pilgrim

Job: Assistant Professor in Art History/Medieval Art, University of Richmond, USA

shieldJob: Assistant Professor in Art History/Medieval Art, University of Richmond, USA
Start Date: August 2017.
Deadline: October 30, 2016.  

The Department of Art and Art History at the University of Richmond invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position at the level of Assistant Professor in the field of medieval art, to begin August 2017. We seek a scholar-teacher whose field of expertise is the art of the medieval period (c. 500-1300 C.E.), with a primary geographical focus on Europe or the Mediterranean basin. We also invite applications from scholars whose work takes a more trans-regional approach. Ideally, candidates would have at least a secondary expertise in Islamic art and architecture and an interest in the rich cultural exchange of the pre-modern Mediterranean.  Teaching responsibilities include five courses annually on a semester system. Outside of regular introductory and core courses, the selected candidate will have considerable freedom in setting his or her own curriculum. We are particularly interested in scholars who, in addition to teaching courses in their field of research, are comfortable teaching introductory-level classes in the history of Western art (ancient to medieval), which may be extended for a global perspective beyond Europe, the theory and methodology of the discipline, supervising undergraduate research, and participating more broadly in the university’s first-year seminars and in the community of scholars working in the Humanities at the University. In addition to maintaining an active research program, candidates are expected to advise students and participate in the governance of the University through service on committees.

Required qualifications: Ph.D. in Medieval Art and/or Architecture, which must be completed by the time of the appointment (July 1, 2017); commitment to undergraduate teaching at a liberal arts institution; evidence of excellence in scholarship; commitment to integrating new technologies in teaching.

How to apply: Candidates should apply to: https://richmond.csod.com/ats/careersite/JobDetails.aspx?id=1007.
Applicants should submit online a curriculum vitae and cover letter which should address the candidate’s research program, teaching philosophy, experience, and interests. Applicants should also send the names of three references who will receive an automated email asking them to submit their reference letters to this web site.

A group of candidates will be chosen in November and asked to submit a writing sample. Interviews will take place at CAA in New York in February of 2017. Pending approval of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, on campus interviews with finalists will follow CAA.