Tag Archives: Medieval art

CFP: ‘Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and Scale in Medieval Art’, Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium, London, Friday 8 February 2019

image-1024x745The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider issues and opportunities encountered by medieval artists and viewers in relation to size and scale.

Deadline: 16 November 2018

From micro-architectural reliquaries and minute boxwood prayer beads to colossal sculpture and the built spaces of grand cathedrals and civic structures, size mattered in medieval art. Examples of simple one-upmanship between the castles and palaces of lords and kings and the churches and cathedrals of abbots and bishops are numerous. How big to make it was a principal concern for both patrons and makers of medieval art. Scale could be manipulated to dramatic effect in the manufacture of manuscripts and the relative disposition of elements within their decorative programmes. Divine proportions – of the Temple of Solomon or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre – were evoked in the specific measurements and configuration of contemporary buildings and decisions were made based on concern with numbers and number sequences.

Inspired by the ‘Russian doll’ relationship between the Sainte Chapelle in Paris and its micro-architectural miniature in the form of a gilded reliquary in the Musée de Cluny, Scaling the Middle Ages seeks to explore a range of questions surrounding proportion, scale, size, and measurement in relation to medieval art and architecture. The Sainte Chapelle, built by the saint-king of France Louis IX to house the relics of Christ’s Passion, is itself often described as an over-sized reliquary turned inside-out. The Cluny reliquary – made to house relics of Saints Maxien, Lucien, and Julien held within the chapel – both complicates and compliments that comparison, at once shrinking the chapel back down to size through close architectural quotation of its form in miniature and pointing the viewer’s attention back to that same, larger space. The relationship between these two artefacts raises a host of questions, including:

Scale and making

How were ideas about size and scale communicated between patrons, architects, craftspeople, and artists? In an age without universal standardised units of measurement, how did craftsmen negotiate problems of scale and proportion?

How were the measurements of a medieval building determined? What techniques did architects, masons, and artists use to determine the scale of their work?

Scale and meaning

What effects were achieved and what responses evoked by the manipulation of scale, from the minute to the massive, in medieval art?

What was the role of proportion and scale in architectural ‘copies’ or quotations?

What representational problems were encountered by artists approaching out-sized subjects, such as giants?

How was scale manipulated in order to communicate hierarchy or relative importance in medieval art?

How did size and scale function in competition between patrons or communities in their artistic commissions and built environments?

Problems of scale

What, if anything, happened when something was the wrong size? When was something too big, or too small? And how were such problems solved by patrons and makers?

How does the disembodied viewing of medieval art through digital surrogates distort or assist in our perception of scale?

How can modern measuring techniques and digital technology enhance our understanding of medieval objects and buildings?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these and related issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing buildings and objects from across the Middle Ages (broadly understood in geographical and chronological terms). The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research.

To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a CV, to teresa.lane@courtauld.ac.uk and oliver.mitchell@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 16 November 2018.

Organised by Oliver Mitchell and Teresa Lane (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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CFP: Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and Scale in Medieval Art, 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium, The Courtauld Institute of Art, February 8, 2019

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider issues and opportunities encountered by medieval artists and viewers in relation to size and scale.

Deadline: 16 November 2018

From micro-architectural reliquaries and minute boxwood prayer beads to colossal sculpture and the built spaces of grand cathedrals and civic structures, size mattered in medieval art. Examples of simple one-upmanship between the castles and palaces of lords and kings and the churches and cathedrals of abbots and bishops are numerous. How big to make it was a principal concern for both patrons and makers of medieval art. Scale could be manipulated to dramatic effect in the manufacture of manuscripts and the relative disposition of elements within their decorative programmes. Divine proportions – of the Temple of Solomon or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre – were evoked in the specific measurements and configuration of contemporary buildings and decisions were made based on concern with numbers and number sequences.

Inspired by the ‘Russian doll’ relationship between the Sainte Chapelle in Paris and its micro-architectural miniature in the form of a gilded reliquary in the Musée de Cluny, Scaling the Middle Ages seeks to explore a range of questions surrounding proportion, scale, size, and measurement in relation to medieval art and architecture. The Sainte Chapelle, built by the saint-king of France Louis IX to house the relics of Christ’s Passion, is itself often described as an over-sized reliquary turned inside-out. The Cluny reliquary – made to house relics of Saints Maxien, Lucien, and Julien held within the chapel – both complicates and compliments that comparison, at once shrinking the chapel back down to size through close architectural quotation of its form in miniature and pointing the viewer’s attention back to that same, larger space. The relationship between these two artefacts raises a host of questions, including:

Scale and making

  • How were ideas about size and scale communicated between patrons, architects, craftspeople, and artists? In an age without universal standardised units of measurement, how did craftsmen negotiate problems of scale and proportion?
  • How were the measurements of a medieval building determined? What techniques did architects, masons, and artists use to determine the scale of their work?

Scale and meaning

  • What effects were achieved and what responses evoked by the manipulation of scale, from the minute to the massive, in medieval art?
  • What was the role of proportion and scale in architectural ‘copies’ or quotations?
  • What representational problems were encountered by artists approaching out-sized subjects, such as giants?
  • How was scale manipulated in order to communicate hierarchy or relative importance in medieval art?
  • How did size and scale function in competition between patrons or communities in their artistic commissions and built environments?

Problems of scale

  • What, if anything, happened when something was the wrong size? When was something too big, or too small? And how were such problems solved by patrons and makers?
  • How does the disembodied viewing of medieval art through digital surrogates distort or assist in our perception of scale?
  • How can modern measuring techniques and digital technology enhance our understanding of medieval objects and buildings?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these and related issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing buildings and objects from across the Middle Ages (broadly understood in geographical and chronological terms). The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research.

To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a CV, to teresa.lane@courtauld.ac.uk and oliver.mitchell@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 16 November 2018.

Organised by Oliver Mitchell and Teresa Lane (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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CFP: The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400, Valladolid, June 7–8, 2019

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 Tabernacle-shrine from Mule,
Iceland, now in the Nationalmuseet
in Conpenhagen; c.1250.
Photo: Justin Kroesen

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

How to Submit: Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es.

Deadline: Friday 18th of January 2019.

All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Museu de Lleida: diocesà i comarcal.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th  of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th  of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

Conference: New Dialogues in Art History, The Warburg Institute, London, September 26, 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f472296712f2640004419952f12foriginalThis one day conference brings together the next generation of art history scholars to present and discuss their ongoing research. Papers will predominately focus on Italian and Northern Renaissance Art (c. 1400–1600) and will encompass diverse media including tapestry, painting, engraving and stained glass. The conference will comprise five sessions. In the first four, two PhD students (or recent graduates) will present on topics that are united by common themes such as patronage, attribution and materiality. The final session, entitled ‘Opening New Dialogues’, will feature a paper by Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director and former PhD student at The Warburg). In order to foster the intellectual exchange central to ‘New Dialogues in Art History’ , the key paper(s) of each session will be followed by 20 minutes discussion.

Organised by Genevieve Verdigel & Lydia Goodson. Please direct any enquiries to the organisers at: NewArtDialogues@gmail.com

Programme

10:00–10:15: Registration

10:15–10:30: Introduction: Lydia Goodson and Genevieve Verdigel

10:30–11:30: Session 1: Making and Materiality
Chair: Alexander Röstel (Courtauld Institute / The National Gallery)
– Ang Li (University of Oxford): ‘The Revival of Gold Ground in Late Fifteenth-Century Italian Paintings.’
– Benedetta Pacini (University of Warwick/ The National Gallery): ‘Making and Moving Venetian Renaissance Paintings: my interviews with chief restorers in Venice and London, and archival records about Tintoretto’s transport strategy.’

11:30–11:45: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

11:45–12:45: Session 2: Attribution and Authorship
Chair: Dr Olenka Horbatsch (British Museum; PhD 2017, University of Toronto)
– James Wehn (Case Western Reserve University/ The Cleveland Museum of Art): ‘The Maker’s Image: Israhel van Meckenem, His Name, and His Copies.’
– Catherine Spirit (University of York): ‘Weaving Light: Untangling Authorship in the Windows of All Saints Church, Earsham.’

12:45–13:45: Lunch (Provided for Speakers and Chairs)

13:45–14:45: Session 3: Prestige and Patronage
Chair: Adriana Concin (Courtauld Institute)
– Dr Ilaria Taddeo (PhD 2017, IMT School for Advanced Studies, Lucca): ‘Artistic Patronage, Family Prestige and Religious Politics. The case of the Guidiccioni between Lucca and Rome (c. 1530-1550).’
– Anne-Sophie Laruelle (University of Liège): ‘Reconsidering Tapestry Patronage and Trade in the Renaissance.’

14:45–15:00: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

15:00–16:00: Session 4: Itinerancy and Interchange
Chair: Lois Haines (Warburg Institute / The National Gallery)
– Giulio Dalvit (Courtauld Institute): ‘Circulation of Drawings in Castiglione Olona: Masolino, Paolo Schiavo, Vecchietta, Domenico Veneziano and Cyriacus of Ancona.’
– Matthew Whyte (University College, Cork): ‘Stylistic Exchange and Civic Identity in Michelangelo’s work on the Arca di San Domenico in Bologna.’

16:05–16:55: Session 5: Opening New Dialogues
– Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director, Warburg Institute): ‘The Specifics of Authorship: Attributing Production.’

16:55–17:00: Concluding Remarks
17:00–18:00: Reception

Free and Open to all. Advanced booking required via Eventbrite.

Conference “De l’Espagne à l’Europe du Nord. Les manuscrits enluminés français et flamands de la Bibliothèque nationale d’Espagne (Madrid)”, Lille University, 29/03/2018

logoBNE

Le projet scientifque intitulé De l’Espagne à l’Europe du Nord : les manuscrits français et flamands de la Biblioteca nacional de España (Madrid), dirigé par Anne-Marie Legaré, professeur d’Histoire de l’Art médiéval (IRHiS, UdL) et assistée de Samuel Gras, docteur en Histoire de l’Art médiéval (IRHiS, UdL), repose sur un partenariat inédit entre l’IRHiS, l’Université de Lille et la Biblioteca nacional de España (BNE) avec M. Javier Docampo, directeur de la BNE et Mme María José Rucio Zamorano, chef du département des manuscrits et des Incunables de la BNE.

L’Histoire de l’Art et l’espace septentrional sont au cœur du projet conçu par l’IRHiS et l’Université de Lille qui se concentre pour le moment sur les manuscrits enluminés d’origine française et flamande conservés à la BNE  ; un corpus d’une richesse exceptionnelle de plus de 150 pièces et qui constitue l’un des feurons de ses collections.

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Call for Papers “To be [titled], or not to be [titled]? Art History and its “well-(un)known” masters…” at Nordik 25-27/10/2018, Copenhagen, Deadline 23/03/2018

Majestatis

It seems to be impossible to imagine an art history without names. In scientific practice the attribution to a “name” can significantly influence the perception and assessment of traditional works of art.
Since the beginning of the 20th century art historians – starting with Adolf Goldschmidt (1863-1944) or Wilhelm Vöge (1868-1952) – often have used to handle art works – especially medieval objects – by their mostly unknown masters (“Künstlerkunstgeschichte”). In Sweden, Johnny Roosval (1879-1965) e. g. finds himself in this tradition by documenting and classifying the inventory of medieval art on Gotland inventing names for artists such as the well-known masters “Byzantios”, “Majestatis” or “Calcarius”

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Lecture: “Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross, Institute for Historical Research, 27/02/2018

Easby Cross

NOW CANCELLED DUE TO INDUSTRIAL ACTION!

 

The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting the following lecture on Tuesday 27th February at 7pm:

Meg Boulton, speaking on ‘”Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross.

Location: Institute of Historical Research, Wolfson Room NB01, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend!