Tag Archives: Medieval art

Conference: New Dialogues in Art History, The Warburg Institute, London, September 26, 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f472296712f2640004419952f12foriginalThis one day conference brings together the next generation of art history scholars to present and discuss their ongoing research. Papers will predominately focus on Italian and Northern Renaissance Art (c. 1400–1600) and will encompass diverse media including tapestry, painting, engraving and stained glass. The conference will comprise five sessions. In the first four, two PhD students (or recent graduates) will present on topics that are united by common themes such as patronage, attribution and materiality. The final session, entitled ‘Opening New Dialogues’, will feature a paper by Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director and former PhD student at The Warburg). In order to foster the intellectual exchange central to ‘New Dialogues in Art History’ , the key paper(s) of each session will be followed by 20 minutes discussion.

Organised by Genevieve Verdigel & Lydia Goodson. Please direct any enquiries to the organisers at: NewArtDialogues@gmail.com

Programme

10:00–10:15: Registration

10:15–10:30: Introduction: Lydia Goodson and Genevieve Verdigel

10:30–11:30: Session 1: Making and Materiality
Chair: Alexander Röstel (Courtauld Institute / The National Gallery)
– Ang Li (University of Oxford): ‘The Revival of Gold Ground in Late Fifteenth-Century Italian Paintings.’
– Benedetta Pacini (University of Warwick/ The National Gallery): ‘Making and Moving Venetian Renaissance Paintings: my interviews with chief restorers in Venice and London, and archival records about Tintoretto’s transport strategy.’

11:30–11:45: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

11:45–12:45: Session 2: Attribution and Authorship
Chair: Dr Olenka Horbatsch (British Museum; PhD 2017, University of Toronto)
– James Wehn (Case Western Reserve University/ The Cleveland Museum of Art): ‘The Maker’s Image: Israhel van Meckenem, His Name, and His Copies.’
– Catherine Spirit (University of York): ‘Weaving Light: Untangling Authorship in the Windows of All Saints Church, Earsham.’

12:45–13:45: Lunch (Provided for Speakers and Chairs)

13:45–14:45: Session 3: Prestige and Patronage
Chair: Adriana Concin (Courtauld Institute)
– Dr Ilaria Taddeo (PhD 2017, IMT School for Advanced Studies, Lucca): ‘Artistic Patronage, Family Prestige and Religious Politics. The case of the Guidiccioni between Lucca and Rome (c. 1530-1550).’
– Anne-Sophie Laruelle (University of Liège): ‘Reconsidering Tapestry Patronage and Trade in the Renaissance.’

14:45–15:00: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

15:00–16:00: Session 4: Itinerancy and Interchange
Chair: Lois Haines (Warburg Institute / The National Gallery)
– Giulio Dalvit (Courtauld Institute): ‘Circulation of Drawings in Castiglione Olona: Masolino, Paolo Schiavo, Vecchietta, Domenico Veneziano and Cyriacus of Ancona.’
– Matthew Whyte (University College, Cork): ‘Stylistic Exchange and Civic Identity in Michelangelo’s work on the Arca di San Domenico in Bologna.’

16:05–16:55: Session 5: Opening New Dialogues
– Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director, Warburg Institute): ‘The Specifics of Authorship: Attributing Production.’

16:55–17:00: Concluding Remarks
17:00–18:00: Reception

Free and Open to all. Advanced booking required via Eventbrite.

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Conference “De l’Espagne à l’Europe du Nord. Les manuscrits enluminés français et flamands de la Bibliothèque nationale d’Espagne (Madrid)”, Lille University, 29/03/2018

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Le projet scientifque intitulé De l’Espagne à l’Europe du Nord : les manuscrits français et flamands de la Biblioteca nacional de España (Madrid), dirigé par Anne-Marie Legaré, professeur d’Histoire de l’Art médiéval (IRHiS, UdL) et assistée de Samuel Gras, docteur en Histoire de l’Art médiéval (IRHiS, UdL), repose sur un partenariat inédit entre l’IRHiS, l’Université de Lille et la Biblioteca nacional de España (BNE) avec M. Javier Docampo, directeur de la BNE et Mme María José Rucio Zamorano, chef du département des manuscrits et des Incunables de la BNE.

L’Histoire de l’Art et l’espace septentrional sont au cœur du projet conçu par l’IRHiS et l’Université de Lille qui se concentre pour le moment sur les manuscrits enluminés d’origine française et flamande conservés à la BNE  ; un corpus d’une richesse exceptionnelle de plus de 150 pièces et qui constitue l’un des feurons de ses collections.

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Call for Papers “To be [titled], or not to be [titled]? Art History and its “well-(un)known” masters…” at Nordik 25-27/10/2018, Copenhagen, Deadline 23/03/2018

Majestatis

It seems to be impossible to imagine an art history without names. In scientific practice the attribution to a “name” can significantly influence the perception and assessment of traditional works of art.
Since the beginning of the 20th century art historians – starting with Adolf Goldschmidt (1863-1944) or Wilhelm Vöge (1868-1952) – often have used to handle art works – especially medieval objects – by their mostly unknown masters (“Künstlerkunstgeschichte”). In Sweden, Johnny Roosval (1879-1965) e. g. finds himself in this tradition by documenting and classifying the inventory of medieval art on Gotland inventing names for artists such as the well-known masters “Byzantios”, “Majestatis” or “Calcarius”

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Lecture: “Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross, Institute for Historical Research, 27/02/2018

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NOW CANCELLED DUE TO INDUSTRIAL ACTION!

 

The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting the following lecture on Tuesday 27th February at 7pm:

Meg Boulton, speaking on ‘”Structuring the Sacred”: Considering Framing, Space and Place on the Easby Cross.

Location: Institute of Historical Research, Wolfson Room NB01, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend!

Call for Papers: Illuminating the Dark Ages: Manuscript art and knowledge in the Early Medieval World (c. 600-1100), University of Edinburgh, 28-29/06/2018, Deadline 15/03/2018

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“Illuminating the Dark Ages” has been conceived as an international conference that aims to bring together researchers of all levels, including postgraduate students, working on the wider Early Middle Ages and the decorated manuscript as a cultural medium. From a variety of perspectives, this conference intends to shed light on how and why manuscripts were decorated in the early medieval period, from lavishly illuminated religious cycles to illustrations of works of Classical literature. Even though the geographical focus is put on the Latin West, comparative approaches to manuscript visual cultures and knowledge transmission in other cultural areas (roughly in the same chronological period), such as Byzantium or the Islamic world, are naturally welcomed.The keynote lectures will be delivered by Prof. Michele Bacci (Fribourg) and Dr. Felicity Harley-McGowan (Yale). Continue reading

Conference: “Bells and Smells: Sensory Experiences of the Medieval Liturgy”, Senate House, University of London, 24/02/2018

Bells and Smells

The five senses occupied an ambiguous place in medieval religious life. For generations of theologians and pastoral writers, the senses were gateways for sin to enter body and soul. And yet, in the rarefied environment of liturgical performance, they became the means by which mortals could apprehend the Almighty. Imagery, music, incense, touch and even taste played a role in shaping medieval worshippers’ encounters with the sacred. The papers in this conference consider how the senses were employed and how they were a source of both religious solidarity and controversy.

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Call for Papers: Art of The Invisible, Courtauld Institute of Art 19/10/2018, Deadline 14/05/2018

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An interdisciplinary conference at The Courtauld Institute of Art exploring art’s relationship with the invisible.

‘He even painted things that cannot be represented …’, Pliny eulogized Apelles in his Naturalis historia. ‘How can we with mortal eyes contemplate this image whose celestial splendour the host of heaven presumes not to behold?’, asks a Byzantine hymn dedicated to the celebrated Image of Edessa. Cennino Cennini, in the first chapter of his Libro dell’arte, writes that painting ‘…calls for imagination, and skill of hand, in order to discover things not seen, hiding themselves under the shadow of natural objects, and to fix them with the hand, presenting to plain sight what does not actually exist.’ In her 1949 essay Some memories of Pre-dada: Picabia and Duchamp, Gabrielle Buffet-Picabia tried to summarise the art of her era: ‘It would seem … that in every field, the principal direction of the 20th century was the attempt to capture the “nonperceptible”.’

Art has been preoccupied with the invisible before, between, and beyond these disparate yet kindred statements. One of artists’ greatest challenges is and has been representing the invisible subject, in its many guises. Artists working in media based on perception, such as painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, and installation, must devise strategies to visualise the invisible: It is a foundational paradox of art.

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