Tag Archives: Medieval art

CfP: New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture, Leeds, 16-17 Mar 2018

Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, March 16 – 17, 2018
Deadline: Sep 30, 2017

New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture

Focusing on the materiality of medieval sculpture has proven crucial to
its study and has expanded our historical understanding of sculpture
itself. Whether monumental relief sculpture in stone, wooden sculptures
in the round, sculpted altarpieces, ivory plaques or enamelled
reliquaries, the possibilities for research on medieval sculpture now
extend far beyond the established canon.

Contemporary medieval sculpture studies have opened the field to
comparative and inclusive research that embraces the social,
performative, gendered and ritual uses of medieval sculpture. These
developments have inspired the organisers of the conference New
Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture to reflect on the field
and ask how do we investigate medieval sculpture today and what might
come ‘after’ materiality?

This two-day conference seeks to assess and critique the state of the
field on medieval sculpture and to investigate new directions,
approaches and technologies for research. A consideration of the state
of the field could be approached through, but is not limited to, the
following topics:

    Processes and techniques of medieval sculpture
    The sensory experience of medieval sculpture
    The ephemeral and intangible aspects of medieval sculpture
    Medieval sculpture, photography and digital reproduction
    Archives, casts and reconstructing medieval sculpture
    Sculpture and medievalism
    Historiography of medieval sculpture studies
    Exhibition histories of medieval sculpture

This conference is hosted by the Henry Moore Institute, a centre for
the study of sculpture, and is convened by Dr Elisa Foster, 2016-18
Henry Moore Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow.

Accommodation and reasonable travel expenses within the UK will be
reimbursed.

Paper proposals should be sent via email to Dr Elisa Foster:
elisa.foster@henry-moore.org by 30 September 2017.

CfP: Painted on the wall:  the wall as a visual panel in the Middle Ages

The 11th Complutese Congress on Medieval Art aims to think about the visual function of medieval painted walls, taking into account that they were probably the best mass media in their context.

It will pay attention to the following topics: iconography, techniques, forms and expressive resources, socio-cultural context, preservation and the museum exhibition system.

There will be six sessions:

  • Session I: A multidisciplinary approach to medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Fernando Gutiérrez Baños (Univ. Valladolid)
  • Session II: Territory and medieval wall painting: centre and periphery. Invited Conferences of Prof. Jerrilynn Dodds (Sarah Lawrence College) and Dr Carmen Rallo (General Office of Museums of the Nation in Spain)
  • Session III: Function and meaning of the wall painting. Invited Conferences of Prof. Simone Piazza (Univ. Paul Valéry, Montpelier III) and Dr José Miguel Lorenzo Arribas (Scholl of Cultural Heritage in Spain)
  • Session IV: Techniques and colors in the preparations of the wall. Invited Conference of Prof. Rafael Ruiz Alonso (Royal Academy of History and Art of Saint Quirce)
  • Session V: Wall as an occasional support of other artistic techniques. Invited Conference of Prof. Roger Rosewell (Society of Antiquaries of London)
  • Session VI: Heritage: conservation, museums and virtualization of medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Jordi Camps (MNAC)

For more information: https://www.ucm.es/artemedieval/pintadoenlapared

CfP: CITIZEN CATHEDRALS IN THE MIDDLE AGES; Templa Winter School 2017

Please, see the call for papers of the Templa Winter School, “Citizen Cathedrals in the Middle Ages. Image, institutions, networks” (Girona, December 18th-19th 2017), organized by members of our Research Team (V. Debiais, X. Granero, A. Moreno, G. Boto).

It is addressed mainly to young researchers whose studies are focused on medieval Cathedrals related to their cities, and vice versa.

As with the Templa Summer School 2015 and 2016, the Templa Team will cover the expenses of all researchers whose papers have been accepted.

 

CFP: Concealment and Revelation in the Art of the Middle Ages (Nicosia, 22-24 september 2017)

arnolfo-di-cambio-tomb-of-cardinal-de-braye-detail-11International Conference:  Concealment and Revelation in the Art of the Middle Ages

Nicosia, 22-24 September 2017

CFP Deadline:  30 April 2017

 ‘To reveal art and conceal the artist is art’s aim’ – thus Oscar Wilde in his aphoristic Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891). In the western intellectual tradition, art has repeatedly been conceived and understood as existing at the intersection of the antithetical notions of concealment and revelation – from the old unattributed adage that ‘it is true art to conceal art’ (ars est celare artem) to Robert Rauschenberg’s lapidary statement about the ability of a work of art to reveal something beyond itself (‘A light bulb in the dark cannot show itself without showing you something else too’, scribbled in pencil on the photo collage entitled Random Order, c. 1963). Veiled or unveiled, obscured or illuminated, opaque or transparent, works of art are often invested with meaning(s) and function(s) at the liminal moment of transition from the one state to the next; after all, to resort again to Wilde’s witty prose, ‘the commonest thing is delightful, if one only hides it’.

Recent scholarship on medieval art has brought such considerations to the fore, by tackling issues of screening, veiling / unveiling, temporal and performative transformations, the permeability of barriers and the movement of objects in space, among others. The visibility of sacred relics and their reliquaries, the metal revetments and textile curtains of miracle-working icons, the folding wings of northern European altarpieces, the parting womb of the Vierges ouvrantes or Schreinmadonnen and the porosity of choir screens East and West have all received fairly extensive treatment in monographic studies and specialist articles. Nevertheless, the juxtaposition of these individual phenomena within a broader framework, encompassing both the religious and secular sphere, as well as several different religious traditions, has only seldom been attempted.

The present conference aspires to explore the role of the concept and the act of concealment and revelation in the arts of the Latin West, Byzantium, Islam and Judaism in the course of the Middle Ages (defined chronologically as c. 500-c. 1500). Subjects to be broached include, but are not limited to, the use of curtains or veils in screening objects or spaces; the function of permeable screens (in a variety of materials and media) in structuring accessibility, whether physical, visual, aural or spiritual; the performative aspect of concealing and revealing in all its civic and private manifestations, and the issues of emotional manipulation thereby raised; the role of gesture and spatial motion in the performance of concealment and revelation; the hierarchy of sacred and secular space as the outcome of its compartmentalisation; and the representation of these practices in the pictorial arts.

The conference is planned as a three-day event, to take place at the Archaeological Research Unit of the University of Cyprus, Nicosia, in 22-24 September 2017. Due to budgetary constraints, the speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses cannot be covered, but every effort will be made to secure conference rates at hotels near the conference venue. There is no registration fee for participation or attendance.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit electronically a title and a 300-word abstract (in either English or Greek) for consideration by 30 April 2017. Please send all materials and address all queries to the conference convenors, Michalis Olympios (olympios.michalis@ucy.ac.cy) and Maria Parani (mparani@ucy.ac.cy).

Department of Medieval Studies at Central European University (Budapest)

Saint_Matthew2CEU provides a variety of merit-based SCHOLARSHIPS AND VARIOUS OTHER TYPES OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT available to students from any country (tuition waiver, stipend, housing awards, health insurance coverage).
Please visit: http://www.ceu.edu/financialaid [1].

FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS who are interested in our programs, CEU organizes an INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE IN AUGUST 2017 at which undergraduate students are more than welcome to participate. For more information please visit http://medievalstudies.ceu.edu/events [2]. For the video about the previous undergraduate conference “Faith and Power”
held on August 4-7, 2016, please see:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xjo6eDmfZEo [3].

CEU attend a number of graduate fairs throughout the year to meet prospective students around the globe, the fairs are listed here:
https://www.ceu.edu/admissions/find-out-more/meet-with-us [4].

You and your students can find further details about our programs at http://medievalstudies.ceu.edu/ [5] and we would be glad to give you more information. It is also possible to like us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ceu.med.stud/?fref=ts [6] and to LEARN ABOUT EVENTS, NEWS AND OTHER OPPORTUNITIES inside and outside CEU Medieval Studies.

An OPEN HOUSE event is held in Budapest on NOVEMBER 18, 2016 where candidates can talk to students, staff and faculty members. Prospective students may visit classes and enjoy the international atmosphere of our university during the Open Week (date to be announced).

Cambridge Medieval Art Seminar Series: Craft, Process, Techne

medieval-seminars-2016The University of Cambridge Senior Seminar in Medieval Art meets every other week during full term, attracting an impressive range of speakers from home and abroad.

The Department of the History of Art is pleased to announce the programme for the annual Medieval Art Seminar Series 2016-17. The seminars will explore ideas of craft and process in medieval art at practical and theoretical levels.

Papers (and in one case, a trip to the V&A) will be held on alternating Mondays during Michaelmas and Lent terms and the final two papers of our series will be held in Easter term. The venue for the seminars is Lecture Room 2 of the History of Art Department (1-5 Scroope Terrace, Cambridge CB2 1PX), beginning promptly at 5.30pm. Following questions, attendees are invited to stay and speak more informally with speakers over wine and light nibbles. Lectures are free and open to the public.

Organisers: Robert Hawkins, Amy Jeffs

Please email Robert Hawkins at rh540@cam.ac.uk with any queries.

Programme:

Monday 10th October

Zoe Boden (Victoria and Albert Museum & University of Glasgow)

Opus Anglicanum and the Steeple Aston Cope

Monday 24th October

Group visit to the Opus Anglicanum Exhibition, meet 1.45pm at the V&A

Monday 7th November

Dr George Younge (University of York)

Anglo-Saxon sources of the Theological Windows at Canterbury Cathedral

Monday 21st November

Prof Richard Sennett (LSE and NYU)

The Craftsman: a Discussion

Monday 23rd January

Dr Lucy Wrapson (University of Cambridge, HKI)

Thomas Gooch and Thomas Loveday, two Suffolk Carpenters and their Rood Screens

Monday 6th February

Anya Burgon (University of Cambridge)

The Mechanical Arts in Twelfth-Century School Poetry

Monday 20th February

Dr Peter Dent (University of Bristol)

‘Domine dio fece scolpire questa croce’: Carving the Crucifix in Late Medieval Italy

Monday 27th February

Prof Tim Ingold (University of Aberdeen)

The Craft of Spinning

Monday 6th March

Dr Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Gothic Encounters? Architectural History, Phenomenology and the Gothic Church

Monday 1st May

Prof Susan Rankin (University of Cambridge)

Writing sound : Designing Notation : Carolingian Musical Techne

Monday 15th May

Agata Gomolka (University of East Anglia)

Carving Romanesque Chiaroscuro

 

Exhibition: A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe

October 16, 2016 through January 8, 2017

Walters Presents A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe

Features more than 100 objects from world-renowned collections

Baltimore, MD – The Walters Art Museum presents A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe, a major international loan exhibition that brings together more than 100 works including stained glass, precious metals, ivories, tapestries, paintings, prints, and illuminated manuscripts from 25 public and private collections in the U.S. and abroad, including the Walters’ extraordinary medieval collection. On view from October 16, 2016 through January 8, 2017A Feast for the Senses explores how medieval works of art spoke to all the senses. Luminous stained glass windows, tapestries depicting fragrant gardens, chalices used in the Eucharist—these objects were not only seen, but were also, and at the same time, touched, smelled, tasted, and heard. The Walters is first of only two venues to host this extraordinary exhibition. Admission is free.

During the late medieval period—roughly the 12th to 15th centuries—religious and secular life mingled to the point that the boundaries between them become hard to distinguish: the delights of life and anticipation of heavenly reward were closely intertwined. The arts of the time reflect a new interest in human experience, the enjoyment of nature, and the pursuit of pleasure by evoking and celebrating beauty through all of the senses. While such pleasures were not directed exclusively toward spiritual enlightenment, religious practices were also defined by rich sensory experiences.

The exhibition evokes these not only through the works of art on view but also through specially designed sensory experiences, ranging from smells of roses and incense to the sounds of church bells and gardens, and the tactility of rosary beads.

“In many museums today, visitors experience the artworks by viewing them from afar in silent galleries. A Feast for the Senses will push the boundaries of the art museum by inviting visitors to encounter art with more than just their eyes,” says exhibition curator Martina Bagnoli (former Walters’ curator of medieval art, who is now executive director of the Gallerie Estensi in Modena, Italy).

Loans and Support 

More than 25 museums and collections in the United States and abroad are lending works to the exhibition, including the British Museum, London; the Musée du Louvre, Paris; the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris; the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. The exhibition also includes masterpieces from the Walters’ renowned collection of medieval art, one of the most important in the United States

A Feast for the Senses has been organized by the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, in partnership with the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, and will be on view at the Ringling February 4 through April 20, 2017.

The exhibition received major funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor; the Institute of Museum and Library Services; the National Endowment for the Arts; and anonymous donors, with additional support from the Gary Vikan Exhibition Fund, Nanci and Ned Feltham, and the Helen Hughes Trust. The accompanying catalogue was made possible by an anonymous donor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, or the National Endowment for the Arts.

This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Accompanying Publication

A generously illustrated catalogue presents new research in the developing field of sensory perception within art history. It includes essays by leading scholars exploring the themes of the exhibition through representations of religious practices, royal rituals, feasts and celebrations, and music and literature. Edited by exhibition curator Martina Bagnoli, the catalogue is published by the Walters Art Museum and distributed by Yale University Press. It is available for sale in the Walters Art Museum Store and online ($65, hardcover) beginning in mid-October.

Opening Day Event

A public opening day talk Symposium on the Senses in Medieval Culture will be held Sunday, October 16 at 1:30 p.m. Exhibition curator Martina Bagnoli, Walters’ in-house curator Joaneath Spicer, and other scholars will explore aspects of the role played by sensory perception in medieval culture that are both surprising and completely familiar to us today. A reception and book signing follow. Tickets are $10, and free for Walters members.