Tag Archives: art history

Funding: 2019–20 Shohet Scholars Grant Program, Research on the Ancient Mediterranean

dsc2596-1Application deadline: Jan 15, 2019

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2019–20. Submission deadline is January 15, 2019 (11:59 p.m. EST).

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

One or more Shohet Scholars will be selected each year. The primary intent of the grant is to support significant, innovative research that can be completed and reported upon within and shortly after the award period. Grants may be made to seed innovative approaches and new ideas or to cover specific expenses or phases of a larger project under the direction of the applicant. At this time, awards in the range of $2,000 to $30,000 will be made. A complete history of past and present Shohet Scholars awards is available on the ICS webpage, www.catacombsociety.org.

Eligibility
Scholars of all institutional affiliations and independent scholars may apply for Shohet Scholar funding if they are individual or institutional members of the ICS at the time of the application submission deadline of January 15, 2019 and in possession of a doctoral degree or the equivalent.

Non-U.S. citizens may apply if a co-applicant is a legal permanent resident (i.e. already in possession of “green card” or Form I-551) or native or naturalized citizen of the U.S.A., meets all eligibility requirements, and has a genuinely collaborative and credited leadership role in the proposal. Co-applicants must submit as individuals all the necessary forms except for the research proposal, list of permissions, and budget proposal, which may be filed jointly.

Deadlines and Decisions
The application deadline for the 2018-2019 academic year is January 15, 2019. The award announcement for the 2019-2020 academic year will be made by May 1, 2019, for funding to be disbursed on 15 July 2019. Please note: starting in 2018, all funding is awarded directly to the USA-based awardee, for distribution among project co-applicants and collaborators. The ICS will no longer wire or transfer money to bank accounts outside of the USA.

Click here for application forms and instructions and here for assistance.

Questions ?
If you have any questions about the suitability of proposed projects, application procedures, or any other matters related to the Shohet Scholars Program, please consult our FAQ page or contact us at shohetscholars (at) catacombsociety.org.

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23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2018

23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2018

Free, booking required

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy – or disappearance – in the present.

Existing approaches to the subject help to understand the formation, dispersal, and reassembly of groupings of objects. However, broadening the scope of what a medieval collection is can open new paths of exploration. From immense palace networks to single-volume manuscripts, a wide range of objects can pose complex and exciting questions regarding how physical and conceptual similarity and proximity shaped making and meaning in the Middle Ages.

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers the opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and promote their research.

Organised by Costanza Beltrami (The Courtauld Institute of Art / The Auckland Project) and Maggie Crosland (The Courtauld Institute of Art) with the generous support of The Sackler Research Forum.

Programme

09.30 – 10.00:  Registration

10.00 – 10.10:  Welcome

Session 1: Assembled Objects — chaired by Teresa Lane

10.10 – 10.30: Gesner Las Casas Brito Filho (University of Leeds): Níðwundor’, terrible wonder: The Beowulf Manuscript as a compilation about the ‘East’ (Nowell Codex part in British Library Cotton Vitellius A.xv)

10.50 – 11.10: Krisztina Ilko (University of Cambridge): Collecting Miracles: Visualising the Early Saints’ Cult of the Augustinian Friars

11.10 – 11.30: Elizabeth Mattison (University of Toronto/ KIK-IRPA): The Collection as History: Collecting with and on the Reliquary Bust of Saint Lambert in Liège

11.10 – 11.30: Discussion

11:30 – 12:00: TEA / COFFEE BREAK – Seminar Rooms 1 & 2

Session 2: Strategies of Collecting — chaired by Charlotte Wytema 

12.00 – 12.20: Noah Smith (University of Kent): The Courtrai Chest: A Matter of Personal Collection

12.20 – 12.40: Oliver Mitchell (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Collecting relics, curating an image: regicide, martyrdom, and the sacrificial kingship of Louis IX in the Sainte Chapelle

12.40 – 13.00: Maria Lopez-Monis (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Collecting the profane: Conversion of earthly objects into reliquaries

13.00 – 13.20: Discussion

13.20 – 14.30: LUNCH (provided for speakers only in Seminar Room 1)

Session 3: Collaborating across media — chaired by Nicholas Flory

14.30 – 14.50: Maria Harvey (University of Cambridge): Across time and space: Byzantin(ising) objects in the hands of the Del Balzo Orsini

14.50 – 15.10: Sophia Ong (Rutgers University/INHA): Autres petiz Joyaulx et Reliquiaires pendans: Pendants and the Collecting of Jewelry in the Valois Courts

15.10 – 15.30: Adriana Concin (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Collecting medieval likenesses: Archduke Ferdinand II and his Genealogy of Tyrolian Landesfürsten

15.30 – 15.50: Discussion

15.50 – 16.20: TEA / COFFEE BREAK – Seminar Rooms 1 & 2

Session 4: Spaces of Display — chaired by Harry Prance

16.20 – 16.40: Lesley Milner (The Courtauld Institute of Art): From Medieval treasure room to Renaissance wunderkammer: Sir William Sharrington’s strong room at Lacock Abbey

16.40 – 17.00: Sarah Randeraad (University of Amsterdam): Medii Aevii, Medio Evo, Tempi di Mezzo: ‘Amorphous’ Middle Ages in 19th century Florentine private and public display

17.00 – 17.30: Discussion

17.30 – 17.45: Closing remarks: Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

17.45: RECEPTION (Front Hall)

With special thanks to Michael Carter for his contribution and support for the colloquium.

Job: Lecturer/senior lecturer in art history c. 1400-1800

1280px-the_courtauld_institute_of_art_logo-svg

Salary:  Competitive salary
Closing Date:  Wednesday 21 February 2018
Interview Date:  See advert
Reference:  189

The Courtauld Institute of Art is the UK’s leading institution for teaching and research in Art History and the conservation of paintings; it is also home to one of the finest small art museums in the world. The Art History department has an outstanding research and teaching record from Late Antiquity to the Contemporary with an increasingly global outlook, and embraces its diversity of theoretical approaches and methodologies.

The Courtauld wishes to appoint a full-time Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Art History, to begin on 1 September 2018. The successful candidate will complement the existing teaching strengths of the Department and will have a research focus in any region or period from c.1400-1800. We seek an art historian who situates their research in a wider, global context, and who shares a ‘decentred’ approach that avoids focus on only a single part of the world. An ideal candidate would be able to teach across at least one other field in a way directed by concepts of exchange and interaction, and to build bridges with other areas of art historical investigation. The candidate is expected to be able to situate their work in the theoretical and historiographical debates in their specialised research area and also engage with current issues in global Art History.

The appointee will research and publish to the highest quality and will actively pursue and apply for appropriate research grants; will provide inspiring teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels; and will play an active role in the life and administration of The Courtauld.

PAY: Grade 6 (£36,644 to £41,958) or Grade 7 (£43,117 to £49,461), depending on experience

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 21 February 2018, 23:59 GMT

INTERVIEW DATE: Interviews will be held in the week of 19 March 2018

Postdoc and PhD Scholarships, Novo Nordisk Foundation Denmark

novo-nordisk-fondenPostdoc and PhD Scholarships, Novo Nordisk Foundation Denmark
Application deadline
: Jan 18, 2018

Call for applications for postdoc and Ph.D. scholarships in art history

The Novo Nordisk Foundation in Denmark calls for applications for Mads Øvlisen Postdoctoral Fellowships and Mads Øvlisen PhD Scholarships within art history, practice-based artistic research and art & natural sciences.

Four postdoc fellowships in total are available for funding. Applicants must be anchored at a university, museum or other knowledge institution in Denmark during the grant period. The fellowships run for two years and amount to DKK 1.5 million covering salary, operational costs and administrative fee.

Five PhD scholarships in total are available for funding. Applicants must be enrolled at a university in Denmark and anchored at a host institution in Denmark. The scholarships run for three years and amount to DKK 2 million covering salary, operational costs and administrative fee,.

Applications must be completed and submitted using the foundation’s application system, which can be accessed via the foundation’s website.

More information, guidelines for the application process and eligibility can be found on the foundation’s website:
http://novonordiskfonden.dk/en/content/investigator-grant-art-history-research
http://novonordiskfonden.dk/en/content/project-grants-art-history-research

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

CFP: Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art, Graduate Conference, Florence, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, November 15 – 16, 2018

longform-original-10978-1418143091-9Call for Papers: Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art, Graduate Conference, Florence, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, November 15 – 16, 2018
Deadline: January 31, 2018.

Advanced students currently enrolled in a Doctoral (Ph.D.) program are invited to submit a proposal for a paper to be presented at “Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art;” this international workshop will be held on 15-16 November 2018 at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. The event is organized by Diletta Gamberini (Italian Literature, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München), Jonathan Nelson (Art History, Syracuse University in Florence), and Alessandro Nova (Art History, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut).

For the first time, “Bad Reception” sets out to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplinary fields to discuss the phenomenon of the negative reception of Italian art and architecture, as expressed across a broad spectrum of responses written during the long Cinquecento (late 15th to early 17th century). Scholarly literature has generally focused on individual case studies, or else on the specific inflections of negative criticism in codified literary writings, such as vituperative poems on art. The present workshop seeks to advance the current state of scholarship by exploring the intersections of different genres of texts that were used to criticize paintings, sculptures, and architectures (e.g. artistic literature, epistolography, poetry, memorialistic, and archival documents), and by seeing the impact these discourses had on the afterlife of the art under discussion.

We ask participants to consider one or more of the following points, ideally in reference to several different examples:

– What were the conventions used for criticizing works of art? What were their literary and art-historical sources and models? And how did such conventions evolve over the period under examination?
– How did the criticism articulated by one type of textual discourse (e.g. vituperative poetry) interfere with the form, contents and scope of negative comments to artworks made in different genres?
– On what aspects of the works of art did the critic mostly focus (e.g. lack of decorum, verisimilitude, iconography, technical skill, beauty)?
– What were the consequences of the negative evaluations for the artistic product itself and/or for its author (e.g. revision, rejection, removal, or destruction of the artwork; reduced status of the artist; different forms of reply to the comments)?

The workshop will consist of a series of 25-minutes papers, either in English or Italian, given by senior and junior scholars. Publication of the contributions to the “Bad Reception” workshop will be decided after the event. The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz will provide funding toward the cost of travelling and accommodation for accepted speakers.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in a Doctoral program; dissertation topics need to have been formally accepted. Proposals, written in English or Italian, must include the following information:
1. Academic Summary (university level only): a) name and address of current institution, b) short description of PhD dissertation (200-300 words), c) expected date of completion, d) name and email address of advisor(s).
2. Professional Summary: a list of relevant work experience and/or publications.
3. Proposal: title, and short description (200-300 words).

Interested applicants should send their proposal, in a single file (PDF),
to sekr_nova@khi.fi.it by January 31, 2018.

Funding: Shohet Scholars Grant Program 2018/19, International Catacomb Society

vt-4kdr4_400x400Funding: Shohet Scholars Grant Program 2018/19, International Catacomb Society
Various Locations, July 01, 2018
Application deadline: January 15, 2018

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2018-2019. Submission deadline is January 15, 2018.

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

One or more Shohet Scholars will be selected each year. The primary intent of the grant is to support significant, innovative research that can be completed and reported upon within and shortly after the award period. Grants may be made to seed innovative approaches and new ideas or to cover specific expenses or phases of a larger project under the direction of the applicant. At this time, awards in the range of $2,000 to $30,000 will be made. The Shohet Scholars Program reserves the right not to make a grant in a year in which there are no applications meeting the requirements of the program. A complete history of past and present Shohet Scholars awards is available on the ICS webpage, www.catacombsociety.org.

Eligibility
Scholars of all institutional affiliations and independent scholars may apply for Shohet Scholar funding if they are individual or institutional members of the ICS at the time of the application submission deadline of January 15, 2018 and in possession of a doctoral degree or the equivalent. Preference will be given to applicants in the early postdoctoral or launching stage of their careers (i.e., persons awarded the doctorate within six years prior to the application deadline).

Non-U.S. citizens may apply if a co-applicant is a legal resident or native or naturalized citizen of the U.S.A., meets all eligibility requirements, and has a genuinely collaborative and credited leadership role in the proposal. Co-applicants must submit as individuals all the necessary forms except for the research proposal, list of permissions, and budget proposal, which may be filed jointly.

Employees, contractors, and members of the Board of Directors or Advisory Board of the ICS and their families are ineligible. No applicant will be denied consideration or selection because of race, religion, or ethnic origin. Any fraudulent misrepresentation of self and information about a proposal will result in a disqualification.

Reporting Requirements
Shohet Scholar grant recipients are expected to: 1. acknowledge the Shohet Scholars Program of the International Catacomb Society in all publications and activities that are funded in part or in whole with the award with direct notification to the Society when these events occur and 2. provide the Shohet Scholarship Committee no later than three months after the end of the fellowship year with a brief, illustrated report of the work carried out or in course, suitable for publication on the ICS website.

Deadlines and Decisions
The application deadline for the 2018-2019 academic year is January 15, 2018. The award announcement for the 2018-2019 academic year will be made by May 1, 2018, for funding to be disbursed on July 1, 2018. Please note: starting in 2018, all funding is awarded directly to the USA-based awardee, for distribution among project co-applicants and collaborators. The ICS will no longer wire or transfer money to bank accounts outside of the USA.

Questions ?
If you have any questions about the suitability of proposed projects, application procedures, or any other matters related to the Shohet Scholars Program, please consult our FAQ page or contact us at shohetscholars@catacombsociety.org.