Tag Archives: art history

New PhD scholarship in Spanish Art History at The Courtauld Institute, London

courtauld_institute-logo_teal-and-grey_gif-1The Courtauld Institute, London, is delighted to announce the creation of a fully funded doctoral scholarship in Spanish art-historical studies, commencing at The Courtauld Institute in London in the academic year 2017/18.

The scholarship has been created through the generosity of CEEH (Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica), in association with ARTES, the Iberian & Latin American Visual Culture Group

The Courtauld Institute is one of the world’s leading centres for art-historical research, and the scholarship will cover The Courtauld’s Home/EU/International tuition fees for three years (or four if required), together with an annual stipend of £12,000 for living costs and travel.

 

HOW TO APPLYlogo-ceeh-bn-2

Applicants should apply to The Courtauld’s PhD programme, and then submit an application via the Courtauld Scholarship application form

Applicants must demonstrate that Spanish art, architecture or visual culture forms the focus of their proposed research topic, and are advised to contact prospective supervisors to discuss research proposals well before the application deadline of 9 January 2017. As a minimum applicants are expected to hold a postgraduate qualification such as an MA or equivalent by the time they begin their doctoral studies, and should have at least reading knowledge in Spanish or Catalan. In the first instance applicants should send prospective supervisors a CV, sample of written work in English, and a 300 word proposal. In assessing applications the scholarship committee will consider the extent to which the research proposal falls under the supervisor’s areas of research expertise.
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Job: Assistant Professor in Art History/Medieval Art, University of Richmond, USA

shieldJob: Assistant Professor in Art History/Medieval Art, University of Richmond, USA
Start Date: August 2017.
Deadline: October 30, 2016.  

The Department of Art and Art History at the University of Richmond invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track position at the level of Assistant Professor in the field of medieval art, to begin August 2017. We seek a scholar-teacher whose field of expertise is the art of the medieval period (c. 500-1300 C.E.), with a primary geographical focus on Europe or the Mediterranean basin. We also invite applications from scholars whose work takes a more trans-regional approach. Ideally, candidates would have at least a secondary expertise in Islamic art and architecture and an interest in the rich cultural exchange of the pre-modern Mediterranean.  Teaching responsibilities include five courses annually on a semester system. Outside of regular introductory and core courses, the selected candidate will have considerable freedom in setting his or her own curriculum. We are particularly interested in scholars who, in addition to teaching courses in their field of research, are comfortable teaching introductory-level classes in the history of Western art (ancient to medieval), which may be extended for a global perspective beyond Europe, the theory and methodology of the discipline, supervising undergraduate research, and participating more broadly in the university’s first-year seminars and in the community of scholars working in the Humanities at the University. In addition to maintaining an active research program, candidates are expected to advise students and participate in the governance of the University through service on committees.

Required qualifications: Ph.D. in Medieval Art and/or Architecture, which must be completed by the time of the appointment (July 1, 2017); commitment to undergraduate teaching at a liberal arts institution; evidence of excellence in scholarship; commitment to integrating new technologies in teaching.

How to apply: Candidates should apply to: https://richmond.csod.com/ats/careersite/JobDetails.aspx?id=1007.
Applicants should submit online a curriculum vitae and cover letter which should address the candidate’s research program, teaching philosophy, experience, and interests. Applicants should also send the names of three references who will receive an automated email asking them to submit their reference letters to this web site.

A group of candidates will be chosen in November and asked to submit a writing sample. Interviews will take place at CAA in New York in February of 2017. Pending approval of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, on campus interviews with finalists will follow CAA.

Call for Submissions: ‘Art(ifice),’ North Street Review, Spring 2017

ingolstadt_liebfrauenmc3bcnster_weinschenkenkapelle_astwerkCall for Submissions: ‘Art(ifice),’ North Street Review, University of St. Andrews
Deadline: December 1, 2016

Artifice, n. (Oxford English Dictionary ):

1. Human skill or workmanship as opposed to nature or a natural phenomenon.

2. Skill in devising and using expedients; artfulness, cunning, trickery.

These definitions of artifice contrasts human workmanship with the natural, leaving us with the dichotomy of nature versus humanity. But is art really the opposite of nature, or is there a way to bridge these two disparate domains? How do artists, curators, or collectors navigate the divide? How did viewers and creators of art approach this issue in the past, and is it even relevant question today?

How to submit: The editors of the North Street Review welcome submissions on this topic from postgraduates in Art History courses. Works between 3,000-5,000 words must be submitted to northstreetreview@gmail.com by 1 December, 2016 to be considered for publication in Spring 2017. Please format the document as a docx., adhere to Chicago style citations, and include a brief biography, with your name and affiliated institute. The North Street Review is a peer-reviewed post-graduate journal published by the School of Art History and Museum and Galleries Studies at the University of St. Andrews. Now in its twenty-first year, it has gone through many incarnations and is now a fully digital publication. For more information, please see our website.

Intensive course: ‘Rome as a Palimpsest,’ Rome, April 3-9, 2017

rome_colosseum_aerial_viewIntensive course: Rome as a Palimpsest, Rome, April 3-9, 2017.
Collaborative course organised by the Bibliotheca Hertziana –
Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, des Deutschen Archäologischen
Instituts und des Deutschen Historischen Instituts in Rom.
Deadline for Applications: October 15, 2016

Das Deutsche Archäologische Institut, Abteilung Rom, die Bibliotheca
Hertziana – Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, und das Deutsche
Historische Institut in Rom bieten vom 3. bis zum 9. April 2017 einen
Studienkurs an. Der Intensivkurs unter der Leitung von
WissenschaftlerInnen der beteiligten Institute richtet sich
insbesondere an fortgeschrittene Studierende der Klassischen
Archäologie, der Christlichen Archäologie, der historischen
Bauforschung, der Kunstgeschichte sowie der Geschichtswissenschaften
vom Mittelalter bis zur Zeitgeschichte.
Ausgangspunkt des Kurses ist das Bild von Rom als “Palimpsest”, d.h.
Rom als exemplarischer Ort des Umgangs mit Vergangenheit, des
Auslöschens und Vergessens, der Neuentdeckung, Wiederbelebung und
vielfachen Aneignung von Geschichte, der Überlagerung und des
Ineinandergreifens historischer Epochen. Diese Prozesse des Um- und
Überschreibens, der Inszenierung und Zitierung sollen mit
unterschiedlichen fachlichen Zugangsweisen an ausgewählten Orten und
baulichen Ensembles, vom Kapitol über das Forum Romanum bis hin zum
EUR-Viertel und dem Tiberufer mit dem in diesem Jahr angebrachten Fries
von William Kentridge von der römischen Kaiserzeit bis heute untersucht
werden.
Von den KursteilnehmerInnen wird eine intensive Einarbeitung sowie
aktive Mitarbeit – unter anderem die Übernahme eines Referates inkl.
der fristgerechten Vorbereitung von Themenpapieren und Unterlagen –
erwartet.
Die Zahl der Teilnehmenden ist auf fünfzehn Personen beschränkt. Für
die Gruppe der AltertumswissenschaftlerInnen (Archäologen und
historische Bauforscher) stehen ebenso wie für KunsthistorikerInnen und
HistorikerInnen jeweils 5 Plätze zur Verfügung. Die Kosten für die
Reise bis zu einem Betrag von 150 Euro und Übernachtung werden ebenso
wie Eintritte von den veranstaltenden Instituten übernommen. Die An-
und Abreise ist von den Kursteilnehmern selbst zu organisieren.

Requirements: Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme: abgeschlossener M.A. in einem der für
den Kurs relevanten Fächer bzw. M.A.-Studium in der Endphase.

How to apply: Bewerbungen mit kurzem Motivationsschreiben (max. eine Seite),
Lebenslauf, ggf. Kopie des letzten Studienabschlusses und Skizze eines
laufenden Forschungsvorhabens (bitte nur in elektronischer Form) an:
Rossi@biblhertz.it

CFP: The Network of Cassinese Arts, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Florence, 16-18 Mar 2017

800px-abbey_of_saint_scholastica2c_subiacoCFP: The Network of Cassinese Arts, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Florence, 16-18 Mar 2017
Deadline: Oct 30, 2016

Organized by Alessandro Nova and Giancarla Periti

From the late fifteenth to the mid sixteenth century, an impressive
corpus of architecture, sculpture, and painting was created to
embellish monastic sites affiliated with the Benedictine Cassinese
Congregation of Italy. A religious order of humanistically trained
monks whose mobility among the network of Cassinese monasteries was
paramount to their spiritual reformed agenda, the Cassinese fruitfully
engaged with the most eminent artists and architects of the early
modern period, supporting the production of imagery and architecture
that was often highly experimental in nature. The Cassinese
Congregation constituted a spiritual infrastructure that spread across
the northern, central and southern regions of Italy, through which not
only monks but also works and models circulated, intersected, and
interacted. The mobility and flow of artists, materials, and motifs
tied together the reformed religious communities affiliated with the
Cassinese Congregation and simultaneously connected an antique with a
modern Christian artistic corpus. This system resulted in a virtual
continuum linking works of architecture, sculpture, and painting,
including the Byzantine church of San Vitale in Ravenna, the Norman
cloister of Monreale (Palermo), and Raphael’s Sistine Madonna in
Piacenza.

Scholarship has presented the Cassinese monks principally as learned
patrons of ambitious but locally-inflected works created by credited
Renaissance masters. But such an approach has obscured the fact that
these modern instances of Cassinese Christian arts existed within a
larger cultural network and coexisted with others of differing value,
including the management of late antique buildings, the preservation of
Byzantine mosaics, and the custody of poorly made votive images in
popular shrines. Not only did these lesser-known episodes assure the
survival of late antique arts, and artifacts of limited aesthetic
appeal, but they also provided occasions for Renaissance masters active
in Cassinese communities to confront alternative forms of antiquity in
a dialogue among the arts for the reinvention of a modern Christianized
art.

The present conference proposes itself as a forum for the task of
reconnecting various artistic episodes that were once Cassinese
initiatives in Renaissance Mediterranean Italy and of re-considering
the spatial monastic settings in which the artworks were originally
placed. Investigating the network of Cassinese arts therefore offers a
fresh occasion to gain new perspectives on a rich body of antique and
Renaissance artworks and their life across time, as well as their
makers’ approaches to past models, recipients’ modalities of viewing
and the pressures put on images as agents of religious reform.

Proposals engaging with all aspects of the network of Cassinese arts
are welcome, with a preference for investigations of little-explored
Cassinese works in southern Italy or new readings of major artworks and
their modes of functioning. Comparative approaches to cycles depicting
rebus-like art forms such as grotesques and hieroglyphs are also of
great interest, as are explorations of the social life of Renaissance
artists building on the evidence that some set up workshops within the
Cassinese precincts while working for the monks. Other topics could
include the appropriation and recycling of Early Christian and
Byzantine materials in Cassinese edifices, the ecological management of
built resources (for example, the transfer of antique columns from San
Vitale in Ravenna to the abbey of Santa Maria del Monte in Cesena) that
served to symbolically link Cassinese monasteries, and considerations
on the Cassinese visual network of the sacred, spreading throughout
Mediterranean Italy by means of copies of primary objects and the
mobility of monks, artists and forms.

How to Submit: Please send your proposal (maximum 400 words) and CV in English, German and/or Italian to Dott.ssa Mandy Richter: Richter@khi.fi.it.

JOB: UEA: Art History 330-1400

Senior Lecturer/Reader/Professor in Art History

University of East Anglia – School of Art, Media and American Studies

Location: Norwich
Salary: £47,801 to £55,389
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Permanent

 

Placed on: 14th January 2016
Closes: 12th February 2016
Job Ref: ATR1275

Professor: A competitive salary is available for an outstanding candidate

We are seeking to recruit a Senior Lecturer/Reader/Professor in Art History in any one of the following three areas: Art History 330-1400; Art History 1400-1700; and Art History 1800-1900. The successful candidate will have a PhD (or equivalent qualification or experience) in a relevant subject area and an expertise in museum studies or comparable professional experience of museums would also be welcome but it is not essential.

You will act as a lead for your subject area upon arrival and as such will provide vision and direction in the area of Art History. You will be expected to take on the role of Head of School at some point in the future.

This full time indefinite post is available from 1 September 2016.

Closing date: 12 noon on 12 February 2016.

Exploring the Fourteenth Century Across the Eastern and Western Christian World (Leeds 2016 session)

ASeveredBond[1]“ […] and that Giotto changed the profession of painting from Greek back into Latin, and brought it up to date.” Cennino Cennini, The Craftsman’s Handbook, Chapter I

These words by the Italian artist Cennino Cennini, written just before the end of the fourteenth century, seem to testify to the definitive break between the Byzantine and the Western artistic traditions. Whilst studies of cultural and artistic relationships between the Catholic and Orthodox milieux during the thirteenth century are plentiful, the fourteenth century is considered as the culmination of the rupture between the two, a rupture initiated by the Fourth Crusade and the following Sack of Constantinople in 1204.

This session aims to challenge traditional assumptions about interactions between the East and the West, and explore possible points of contact between the Byzantine and the Latin traditions. Indeed, while the disastrous political and religious outcome of the Union of Lyon in 1274 seemed to presage a definitive break between the two Christian Worlds, their cultural and socio-political histories remained deeply intertwined. The Latin domination and the ongoing Franciscan missionary activities left profound traces in Constantinople and the Empire. Similarly, Byzantine merchants and scholars, as well as looted or exchanged artefacts, travelled to the West, influencing Latin culture and creating new artistic trends.

From an art historical point of view, it is commonly acknowledged that while fourteenth-century Western artists explored three-dimensionality, Byzantine art maintained an abstract character. However, visual evidence demonstrates that similar changes occurred in both Eastern and Western art at this time: the number of figures increases, architectural settings become more detailed and multiple episodes are adopted to expound a narrative that was previously encapsulated in one scene only. Are these changes linked? What are the similarities and dissimilarities?

Scholars within the field of late medieval Western and Byzantine history and art history are invited to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers. We propose a loose understanding of the fourteenth century that includes the end of the thirteenth and the beginning of the fifteenth to better contextualise the session’s findings. Topics may include but are not restricted to:

Contacts between Eastern and Western merchants, patrons, and artists

Diplomatic embassies, marriage alliances, and gift exchange between the Eastern and Western Christian world

Eastern scholars emigrating to the West and vice versa

Instances of comparison between specific monumental decorations across East and West

Examples of Orthodox churches build in the West or Catholic churches in the East, their influences and effects

The proliferation of more developed narratives and secondary hagiographical cycles

The increase in the number of figures and the role of architectural settings within the narrative

Please send papers’ titles, abstracts of 250 words and a 100-word biography by September 21, 2015 to:

Maria Alessia Rossi: Mariaalessia.rossi@courtauld.ac.uk and Livia Lupi: ll546@york.ac.uk