Tag Archives: medieval

Vacancy: Lecturer in Art History (pre 1750), University of St Andrews

St AndrewsLecturer in Art History – AC2042AC

University of St Andrews – School of Art History

Start Date: As soon as possible

We wish to appoint a Lecturer (Pre 1750) within the School of Art History. You will be a scholar with a growing international research reputation in art or architectural history or a related field and a commitment to delivering high quality teaching within the field of art history (broadly defined). The successful candidates will be expected to have a range of interests, to be active in research publication that strengthens or complements those in the School and to be capable of teaching the subject to undergraduate and taught postgraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds.

Candidates should hold a PhD in a cognate discipline. Excellent teaching skills and an interest in promoting knowledge exchange are essential. You should also have some familiarity with grant seeking processes in relation to research councils and other sources.

Informal enquiries can be directed to the Head of the School of Art History, Dr Julian Luxford (jml5@st-andrews.ac.uk)

The University of St Andrews is committed to promoting equality of opportunity for all, which is further demonstrated through its working on the Gender and Race Equality Charters and being awarded the Athena SWAN award for women in science, HR Excellence in Research Award and the LGBT Charter; http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/hr/edi/diversityawards/.

We encourage applicants to apply online at www.vacancies.st-andrews.ac.uk/welcome.aspx, however if you are unable to do this, please call +44 (0)1334 462571 for an application pack.

Closing Date: 24 April 2017

Please quote ref: AC2042AC

Further Particulars: AC2042AC FPs.doc

Apply: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AYE601/lecturer-in-art-history-ac2042ac/

CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018

dp300044CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

The medieval church portal is in many respects a place of
transformation. At the threshold of a church, various spheres converge
and meet: secular – ecclesiastic, corporeal – spiritual, earthly –
divine. Iconography and formal design offer ample evidence of this
unique situation. At the same time, church portals themselves are
objects of change: their appearances are constantly shifting due to
modification, chromatic reworking and restorative endeavours. After
all, modernism declared portals works of art, and this change of status
was accompanied by a further metamorphosis: The medieval portal became
an aesthetic object and thereby an exhibit with alternative forms of
presentation.

The international final conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as
Places of Transformation” (University of Bamberg, Chair in Medieval Art
History, Professorship in Building Preservation Sciences, Professorship
in Building History and Building Archaeology) will provide various
conference sections focusing on central issues of continuity and change
as they pertain to medieval portals:

Section 1: Conceptual design of medieval portals. The interplay of
architecture and sculpture (building design, design methods,
proportions, room arrangement)

Section 2: Construction of medieval portals. Structural analyses for
the documentation of transformation processes (footing, interlinking of
constructive units, masonry technique, types of stone, structural
analysis, construction process)

Section 3: Iconographic programmes. The portal as a place of spiritual
transformation in the Middle Ages (Iconography, text and image,
eschatological themes, cosmos/cardinal directions)

Section 4: Medieval bronze and wood doors (doors, hinges, mountings,
closing and latching mechanisms)

Section 5: Changing portals. Secular and liturgical use (medieval
procession liturgies, user hierarchy, liturgical dramas and legal acts)

Section 6: Adaptations, alterations and modifications of portals
(restoration layers, renovation measures, surface treatments,
maintenance, supplementation using copies, copying techniques in stone,
plaster und synthetic materials)

Section 7: The portal as a work of art (museum displays, illuminations,
repurposing, virtual presentations and representations)

The conference languages are German, English and French. Please send
your abstract (max. 1500-2000 characters, including spaces) to
Katja.Schroeck@uni-bamberg.de no later than 15 June 2017.

CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)
How to Apply: Proposals for either 3-paper sessions or individual papers will be equally welcome. Individual papers should be 20 minutes in length. Please submit an abstract of no more that 250 words and a brief CV to mem2017@fcsh.unl.pt
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

NB: Conference Registration Fees:
Participation with Paper: 75€ (Registration fee includes documentation and coffee-breaks);
• Attendance: 30€ for the general public and 25€ for students;
• Gala Dinner: 35€.

In December, as the third year of its six-year Strategic Project draws to a close, the Institute for Medieval Studies – whose research groups have been working around our main theme, “People and Knowledge in Motion: Medieval Portugal in Trans-European Networks” – is hosting a Conference aimed at bringing together scholars from around the world in order to discuss and reassess the research undertaken in the Institute and in the wider academic world on mobility, the circulation of models, and phenomena of a global nature during the Middle Ages. In the course of the last three years, researchers specialising in the areas of History, History of Art, Archaeology and Literature, have developed their research with a strong emphasis on the question of the circulation of men and women, ideas, models and artefacts as mirrors of a medieval reality in which
mental, symbolic and physical mobility seems to correspond less and less to the ancient perceptions and stereotypes of Medieval Men and Society as characterized by stillness and immutability. Furthermore, work in the Institute has raised additional questions and problems intimately connected with the topics being studied, but also very much in line with current historiographical trends. For this reason, the organizers of the 4th International Conference on Medieval Europe in Motion deemed it appropriate to take our principal concern a step further and propose as its main subject the question whether or not it is possible to speak of a Global Middle Ages.
The Conference will seek to provide a forum for scholars from all disciplines who are willing to examine this topic. We invite participation from graduate students, early-career researchers and senior scholars. Papers are warmly welcome whether in English, Portuguese, Spanish, French or Italian.
The three sections of the Conference will be:
1. Debating the Global Middle Ages: Theoretical and Historiographical Approaches;
2. Texts, Images and Representations;
3. Territories and Powers: a “Glocal” Perspective.
Possible topics may include, but are by no means restricted to, the following:
• approaches to sub-global, semi-global and pan-global concepts and the discussion of contact,
exchange, interaction, circulation, integration and exclusion;
• analysis of concepts and case studies concerning diffusion, outreach, dispersal and expansion;
• approaches to concepts of impact, reception, acceptance, transformation and reform.
Selected proceedings will be edited by the Institute of Medieval Studies, as a peer-reviewed e-book, during the course of 2018.

 

Job (permanent): Properties Historian at English Heritage, deadline 15 April 2017

EHEnglish Heritage is looking for a Properties Historian for a permanent post based in London. Salary c. £30,000. They’re especially keen to find a specialist on castles, or a medievalist. Deadline 15 April 2017. Further details here

 

 

(From the EH site) We are looking for a historian, archaeologist or architectural historian to carry out research into our 420 historic monuments, buildings and sites. You will be part of a small team of historians working collaboratively with colleagues from across English Heritage to deliver innovative and engaging interpretation schemes for visitors to our sites.

Under the direction of a Senior Properties Historian you will be responsible for undertaking and managing research into our sites, and for the dissemination of this research to a wide audience. Working on projects with Curatorial Department colleagues, you will formulate and implement research programmes, providing content and supporting materials for high-quality new presentation schemes. You will also make research publicly available through publication in a variety of media including guidebooks, scholarly journals, the English Heritage website and Members’ Magazine.

We are looking for someone who can work independently, often to very tight deadlines, engaging constructively with a wide range of stakeholders, including curators, interpreters, visitor operations staff and external specialists. You will need to be confident in documentary and archaeological research, and able to synthesise material of different types, ranging from oral history to web-based sources. Your work will include sites from all periods in England’s history, though a specialism in the study of castles and their landscapes and/or post-medieval fortifications would be a distinct advantage.

We bring the story of England to life for over 10 million visitors each year. No matter what they do and where they do it, our people play their part in protecting and presenting some of the greatest places in England for the benefit and enjoyment of our visitors.

We offer a wide benefits package to our employees including a competitive pension scheme, 25 days holiday and free entry into English Heritage sites.

Closing date: 15/04/2017 23:59:59

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting400crop.jpegConference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed.

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome
SECTION I: Ancient and Medieval Collections

(Chair: Cecily Hennessy, Christie’s Education)

10:15 – 10:40 Collecting liturgical objects in thirteenth and fourteenth-century Castile

Maeve O’Donnell-Morales (Courtauld Institute of Art)

10:40 – 11:05 The saint-king’s collection: The treasure of grande châsse in the Sainte-Chapelle

Emily Guerry (University of Kent)

11:05 – 11:30 ‘Through me rulers rule’: A Curious History of Imperial Coronation Regalia

Zoë Opačić (Birkbeck, University of London)

11:30 – 11:55 E.P. Warren, Greek art and the Pan Painter

Amy Smith (University of Reading)

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion
12:10 – 13:40 LUNCH
SECTION II: New Approaches to Collections

(Chair: Sadie Pickup, Christie’s Education) 

13:45 – 14:10 The Digital Pilgrim Project: approaching large collections of miniature art

Amy Jeffs (University of Cambridge)

14:10 – 14:35 From Monastic Libraries to Computer Screens: Collecting Late Antique Illumination through the Centuries

Peter Toth (British Library)

14:35 – 15:00 Collections, Controversies and the Copts: Deciphering the Late Antique Textiles of Egypt

Anna Kelley (University of Birmingham)

15:00 – 15:15 Discussion
15:15 – 15:45 COFFEE & TEA
SECTION III: Private and Public Collections

(Chair: Jana Gajdošová, Christie’s Education)

15:50 – 16:15 The intersection between collecting and scholarship: some personal experience

Michael Carter (English Heritage)

16:15 – 16:40 Exploring the Collection of George R Harding

Naomi Speakman (British Museum)

16:40 – 17:05 Title to be Confirmed

Claudio Corsi (Christie’s, London)

17:05 – 17:15 Discussion
17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks
18:00 Drinks Reception

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Aguilar de Campoo, Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017 (VII Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis)

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Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de Campo (SPAIN), Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017.

CFP for 20-minute ‘free papers’ open until 30 June 2017
How to apply:
send an email with name, Academic institution, 1 page abstract and main bibliography to plhuerta@santamarialareal.org

How to enrol in the conference: email: plhuerta@santamarialareal.org
Price:
Regular 125 € Reduced 90 € Special (students) 60 €

In his The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, the sociologist Émile Durkheim formulated the idea that the division of the world into two domains is the distinctive feature of religious thought, one containing the sacred and the other all that is profane. Durkheim’s distinction cannot be applied to medieval art, however, in which the mixing of secular motifs in religious objects, images, and architecture was characteristic –at least not without complicating the theoretical notion. The senmurf on the eleventh-century reliquary of St. Matthew in SS. Cosma e Damiano in Rome, the figure copied from Orestes on the ancient Husillos sarcophagus above the altar at Fromista, a fragment of victory killing a barbarian from a consular diptych re-used on a 11th/12th century book cover, and the incorporation of diagrams and motifs from natural science in the “aula gotica” in SS. Quattro Coronati in Rome are among myriad examples that document why this is the case.

In one of the best-known texts related to medieval art, Bernard of Clairvaux railed against the imaginative variety of profane art displayed in twelfth-century Cluniac monasteries, which he considered to be a subversion of the moral order of monastic life. Bernard’s diatribe not only confirms the fact that linking the two realms was common but also raises the question of audience and hence also spatiality. As the anthropologist E. E. Evans-Pritchard postulated, sacredness (and therefore the profane) might be considered as situational, in a chronological as well as in a spatial sense. An object considered sacred in a given period may be considered profane or magical in a different time and/or space; decontextualization and reuse are thus also important issues related to the topic. Profane does not always imply anti-sacred. Indeed, given the fact that profanus means “in front of the consecrated enclosure,” the inclusion of secular elements within sacred domains suggests a dynamic interweaving that extends beyond the mere incorporation of motifs and objects. Sometimes the contacts between the two domains was regulated by rites that provided the conditions within which the relationship was made possible (i.e. consecration); other times, as when natural science was assimilated into the choice and manufacture of materials, the overlapping of sacred and profane underlies the processes of art.

In recent decades, historians have explored the uses of subversive elements in sacred art –from marginalia in illuminated manuscripts to coin-imagery and stamping incorporated in Eucharistic hosts. The conference Ars Mediaevalis 2017 sets out to assess the results of the advances made by the new art historiography and, more important, to open up still-unmapped paths for future study of the profane within the sacred during the Middle Ages.

Programme:

Friday, 29th September
Aguilar de Campoo

09.45h : Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis Opening
Chair: Francesca Español UB

10.00h Michele Bacci, Université de Fribourg – Intrusos en los iconos: perspectivas comparativas sobre los retratos individuales en la iconografia sagrada
10.45h Discussion

11.45h Philippe Cordez, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Le repentir d’un magicien ? Les camées de la statuette de David à la cathédrale de Bâle (vers 1320)
12.30h Free paper
12.50h Discussion

16.00h Fernado Villansenor, Universidad de Cantabria – Lo profano y sus espacios: discursos marginales en la Castilla tardogótica
16.45h Javier Docampo, Biblioteca Nacional de España – Las representaciones de los trabajos de los meses en libros de horas: la construcción de un imaginario social
17.15 Discussion

17.45 Round table. “Profano: perímetros espaciales, iconicos y semanticos en el arte medieval / Profane: spatial, iconic, and semantic edges in medieval art” Gerardo Boto.

18.45 Public presentation of the new editorial series “Ars Mediaevalis. Estudios de arte medieval”

Saturday, 30th September
Palencia

(Chair: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños UVA)

10.00h Kathrin Müller, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main Subversive – Devices: Cosmological Diagrams and the Problem of the Sacred
10.45h Free paper
11.05h Discussion

12.00h Beate Fricke, Universität Bern – Representing the Cosmos’ Origins, illuminating cosmological thoughts
12.45h Free paper
13.05h Discussion
16.00h Academic visit: Burgos: Santa María de las Huelgas Reales; Cartuja de Miraflores

Sunday, October 1st
Agilar de Campoo

(Chair: Javier Martínez Aguirre UCM)

09.15h Milagros Guardia, Universitat de Barcelona – Las pinturas murales de Sant Joan de Boi: de como contextualizar la iconografia profana
10.00h Free paper
10.20h Discussion
11.20h Free paper

11.40h Herbert L. Kessler, Johns Hopkins University / Masaryk University – From Vanitas to Veritas: the Profane as a Fifth Mode of Seeing
12.20h Discussion

13.00h Conclusions and perspectives
13.15h Closing ceremony

 

Early Career Lectureship in Medieval Art at The Courtauld, 3 years, from September 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to appoint an Early Career Lecturer in Medieval Art (fixed-term; 3 years from 1 September 2017) to support and deliver teaching in the Department of Art History.

Salary: £35,798 pa (Inc. London Allowance)

courtauld-exterior_new_small-jpg-500x240

 

The Courtauld Institute of Art is the UK’s leading institution for teaching and research in Art History and the conservation of paintings; it is also home to one of the finest small art museums in the world.

Closing date: Monday 13 March 2017

Further details: https://jobs.courtauld.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=121