Tag Archives: University of Pennsylvania

Conference: IIlluminations: Manuscript, Medium, Message, Philadelphia, PA, November 15–17, 2018

201820symposioum20imageIIlluminations: Manuscript, Medium, Message, Philadelphia, PA, November 15–17, 2018
In partnership with the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies (SIMS) at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to announce the 11th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age.

Manuscript illumination has often been considered in relation to the texts it accompanies, but rarely in terms of its interplay with other artistic media. Historically, however, the technique was closely associated with other forms of artistic expression and served as a crucial point of contact and transfer for visual motifs across space and time. The goal of this year’s symposium is to examine cases of intermedial exchange through the lenses of technique, style, iconography, social context, and cultural geography, while also posing broader questions about the deep connections between the craft of illumination and other arts more widely. Of special interest will be insights gained from the technical examination of works in different media, new comparisons made possible by digital technology, and the discovery of linkages once obscured by strict historiographical divisions

The program will begin Thursday evening at 5:00 pm on November 15, 2018, at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Parkway Central Library, with a keynote lecture by Professor Susie Nash of the Courtauld Institute of Art. The symposium will continue November 16th-17th at the Kislak Center of Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania.
Registration is $35 ($10 for students with valid student ID). Registration is now open: click here.

For more information on the Schoenberg Symposium Series, click here.

Organized by Nicholas Herman (hermanni@upenn.edu), Curator of Manuscripts, with Lynn Ransom, Curator of Programs (lransom@upenn.edu), Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania.

The symposium organizers wish to acknowledge the generous support of the Williams Fund of the History of Art Department at the University of Pennsylvania, and of the Wolf Humanities Center’s “Humanities at Large” program.

Program

Opening Reception and Keynote Address

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Susie Nash

Deborah Loeb Brice Professor of Renaissance Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art

with introductions by Will Noel and Sarah Guérin, University of Pennsylvania

The Curious Case of the Collins Hours
(Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1945-65-4)

Rare Book Department
Free Library of Philadelphia, Parkway Central Library, 3rd floor
1901 Vine St, Philadelphia, PA, 19103 (map).

Reception begins at 5:00 pm; lecture begins at 6:00 pm.

Symposium

Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts
University of Pennsylvania Libraries, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center, 6th floor
3420 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 (map).

[abstracts]

Friday, November 16, 2018

9:00 – 9:30 am Coffee and Registration

9:30 – 10:00 am Welcome and Opening Remarks

Constantia Constantinou, H. Carton Rogers III Vice Provost and Director of the Penn Libraries, University of Pennsylvania

Nicholas Herman and Lynn Ransom, University of Pennsylvania

10:00 – 11:15 am Session I: Challenging Media Hierarchies

Presider: David Kim, University of Pennsylvania

Laura Weigert, Rutgers University

Arras, B.M. MS 697: Painting, Illustration, and the Intermediality of Fifteenth-Century Visual Culture

Sonja Drimmer, University of Massachusetts Amherst

When an English Manuscript Is an Italian Printed Book

11:15 – 11:30 am Coffee

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Workshop I

Presider: Amey Hutchins, University of Pennsylvania

Frédéric Elsig and Carmen Decu Teodorescu, University of Geneva

Intermedial exchanges and connoisseurship: recent results for 15th- and 16th-century French painting

12:30 – 2:00 pm Lunch

2:00 – 3:30 pm Session II: Narrativity

Presider: Dot Porter, University of Pennsylvania

Alexandra Green, The British Museum

Manuscripts and Wall Paintings in 18th-19th Century Burma: Offering, Narration, Text, Presence

Christine Sciacca, The Walters Art Museum

Serial Imagery in Ethiopian Painting

3:15 – 3:45 pm Coffee

3:45 – 5:00 pm Session III: Case Studies, between the Exceptional and the Representative

Presider: Katherine Tycz, University of Pennsylvania

Bryan C. Keene, The J. Paul Getty Museum

Authorship, Anonymity, and Attribution in the Archives and Art Historical Scholarship: Case Studies of Italian Painter-Illuminators, 1300-1500

Roger S. Wieck, The Morgan Library & Museum

French Renaissance Artist Jean Poyer: An Assessment

Saturday, November 17, 2018

9:00 – 9:30 am Coffee

9:30 – 10:45 am Session IV: Community, Technique, Practice

Presider: Sarah Reidell, University of Pennsylvania

Nancy Turner, The J. Paul Getty Museum

Technical markers for cross-media exchange: communities of practice and the painter-illuminator in fifteenth-century Italy

Nandita Punj, Rutgers University

Mathen Artistic Expression and Bikaner: Manuscripts, Social Mobility and Identity

10:45 – 11:15 am Coffee

11:15 – 12:30 pm Workshop II

Presider: Will Noel, University of Pennsylvania

Stella Panayotova and Paola Ricciardi, The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge

Intermedial Exchanges: Integrated Analyses of Illuminated Manuscripts

12:30 – 2:00 pm Lunch

2:00 – 3:15 pm Session V: Ornament across Media and Time I

Presider: Elly Truitt, Bryn Mawr College/University of Pennsylvania

Renata Holod, University of Pennsylvania

A 6th Century Hijri/ 12th Century CE Qur’an Copy at the Penn Museum: From Original Layout to Its Use Through Time

Benjamin C. Tilghman, Washington College

Ornament, Space, and Christological Intermediality in an Anglo-Saxon Psalter

3:15 – 3:45 pm Coffee

3:45 – 5:00 pm Session VI: Ornament across Media and Time II

Presider: Robert Ousterhout, University of Pennsylvania

Shreve Simpson, University of Pennsylvania

Medallions in the Margins: the Free Library’s Lewis Oriental ms 1

Georgi Parpulov, Independent Scholar

From China to Byzantium: The Origins of “Flower-Petal” Ornament

5:00 – 5:30 pm Final Discussion and Comments

5:30 – 7:00 pm Closing Dinner Reception

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Conference: Gothic Arts: An Interdisciplinary Symposium (Philadelphia, 23-24/03/2018)

gothic artGothic Arts: An Interdisciplinary Symposium

Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion
Van Pelt Library
University of Pennsylvania

March 23rd-24th, 2018

Organizers
Mary Caldwell, Department of Music
Sarah M. Guérin, Department of the History of Art
Ada Kuskowski, Department of History

In a passage from Thomas Aquinas’s treatise on good governance, a text written for the Cypriot king around 1267, the angelic doctor wrote: “Art is the imitation of nature. Works of art are successful to the extent that they achieve a likeness of nature.” This passage would seem to be the perfect explanation for the exceptionally life-like Adam sculpted for the south transept at the Parisian Notre-Dame, completed a handful of years earlier and possibly seen by Thomas before he left Paris for his Italian sojourn. However, by “ars” Aquinas meant not our “fine arts,” but technique and, even more broadly, human endeavor. The passage comes not from a discussion of the visual arts, but from a justification of benign kingship as opposed to democracy—the former being more akin to nature.

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Post-Doc: CLIR-DLF Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies

CLIRFellowships in Data Curation for Medieval Studies
Information for Applicants
The CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellowship in Data Curation for Medieval Studies is an expansion of the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Academic Libraries. These five, fully-funded fellowships will provide recent Ph.D.s with professional development, education, and training opportunities in data curation for Medieval Studies. Through this program, CLIR seeks to raise awareness and build capacity for sound data management practice throughout the academy.

Each fellowship is a two-year appointment, with a commensurate salary, plus benefits, and a yearly travel and research stipend.

Who May Apply
Recent Ph.D.s from any discipline with relevant expertise in Medieval Studies are encouraged to apply, so long as they meet the eligibility criteria for the Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

2016 Host Institutions and Position Descriptions
Fellows will be placed at research institutions throughout the United States. Additional position descriptions for 2016-2018 will be posted here.

University of Pennsylvania

Questions about the application process or the program should be directed to postdoc@clir.org.

See details on the CLIR website here.