Author Archives: costanzabeltrami

Conference: Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era, London, November 8–9, 2018

slid-charlatanesVenue: Senate House, Bedford Room 37 (8th Nov); Bush House, KCL S2.01 and Instituto Cervantes (9th Nov)

Keynote speakers: Prof Trevor Dadson and Dr Alexander Samson

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.

Click here for a full programme and here to book tickets

Organisers: Roser López Cruz (King’s College London) and Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Conference website: https://iberianintolerance.com

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CFP: Medieval and Early Modern Spaces and Places: Experiencing the Court,Trinity Laban Conservatoire, London, April 3 – 04, 2019

mem20poster_experiencing20the20courtDeadline: Nov 15, 2018

Medieval and Early Modern Spaces and Places: Experiencing the Court, 2019

The early modern court adopted and developed exemplary cultural practices where objects and spaces became central to propagating power as well as places for exchange with other powers. This combination of images, objects, and sounds confronted the senses, making a powerful and distinctive impression of the resident family and the region they represented: flickering candlelight on glass and gold vessels adorned credenze (sideboards); musical instruments announced royal entries or provided entertainment; brightly coloured tapestries covered the palace walls along with paintings of biblical or mythological stories; cabinets displayed antiquities or rarities; perfume burners permeated the air; while the smells and tastes of rare delicacies at the centre of dining tables made for a multi-sensory spectacle.

This year the Open University’s Spaces & Places conference will address the theme of ‘Experiencing the Court’ by exploring the senses and the lived experiences of courtly life, whether based in a particular residence or defined by the travels of an itinerant ruler. This annual conference is fundamentally interdisciplinary: literary, musical, architectural, artistic and religious spaces will be the subjects of enquiry, not as discrete or separate entities, but ones which overlapped, came into contact with one another, and at times were in conflict.

The conference will examine life at court and will consider the following questions:

–    How can approaching the court in terms of the senses provide new methodologies for understanding each institution?
–    How were medieval and early modern courtly spaces adapted and transformed through the movement of material and immaterial things?
–    Which particular aspects of political, social and economic infrastructures enabled the exchange of objects and ideas?

Papers that address new methodologies, the digital humanities, object-centred enquiries, cross-cultural comparisons, or new theoretical perspectives are particularly welcome.

Please send a 150 word abstract along with a short biography to Leah Clark (leah.clark@open.ac.uk) and Helen Coffey (Helen.coffey@open.ac.uk) by 15 November 2018.

The conference will take place at the Open University’s partner institution Trinity Laban Conservatoire on 3 and 4 April 2019.  As Trinity Laban’s King Charles Court was once the site of Greenwich Palace, it is a fitting venue for a conference exploring court life.

For updated information visit our website: http://www.open.ac.uk/arts/research/medieval-and-early-modern-research/spaces-places

Funding: 2019–20 Shohet Scholars Grant Program, Research on the Ancient Mediterranean

dsc2596-1Application deadline: Jan 15, 2019

The Shohet Scholars Grant Program of the International Catacomb Society is now accepting applications to the Shohet Scholars cohort of 2019–20. Submission deadline is January 15, 2019 (11:59 p.m. EST).

This annual grant program funds research on the Ancient Mediterranean from the Hellenistic Era to the Early Middle Ages. Shohet Scholars may do their research in the fields of archeology, art history, classical studies, history, comparative religions, or related subjects. Of special interest are interdisciplinary projects that approach traditional topics from new perspectives.

One or more Shohet Scholars will be selected each year. The primary intent of the grant is to support significant, innovative research that can be completed and reported upon within and shortly after the award period. Grants may be made to seed innovative approaches and new ideas or to cover specific expenses or phases of a larger project under the direction of the applicant. At this time, awards in the range of $2,000 to $30,000 will be made. A complete history of past and present Shohet Scholars awards is available on the ICS webpage, www.catacombsociety.org.

Eligibility
Scholars of all institutional affiliations and independent scholars may apply for Shohet Scholar funding if they are individual or institutional members of the ICS at the time of the application submission deadline of January 15, 2019 and in possession of a doctoral degree or the equivalent.

Non-U.S. citizens may apply if a co-applicant is a legal permanent resident (i.e. already in possession of “green card” or Form I-551) or native or naturalized citizen of the U.S.A., meets all eligibility requirements, and has a genuinely collaborative and credited leadership role in the proposal. Co-applicants must submit as individuals all the necessary forms except for the research proposal, list of permissions, and budget proposal, which may be filed jointly.

Deadlines and Decisions
The application deadline for the 2018-2019 academic year is January 15, 2019. The award announcement for the 2019-2020 academic year will be made by May 1, 2019, for funding to be disbursed on 15 July 2019. Please note: starting in 2018, all funding is awarded directly to the USA-based awardee, for distribution among project co-applicants and collaborators. The ICS will no longer wire or transfer money to bank accounts outside of the USA.

Click here for application forms and instructions and here for assistance.

Questions ?
If you have any questions about the suitability of proposed projects, application procedures, or any other matters related to the Shohet Scholars Program, please consult our FAQ page or contact us at shohetscholars (at) catacombsociety.org.

Conference: La pierre et l’image. Les disciplines en synergie pour mieux dater les édifices du Moyen Âge (XIIe-XVe s.), Université de Lausanne, October 25–27, 2018

irregular-medieval-stone-wallDepuis quelques décennies l’archéométrie et l’archéologie du bâti connaissent un développement conjoint remarquable. Appliquées aux édifices médiévaux, ces disciplines aident de manière substantielle à leur compréhension : si l’étude des élévations permet de restituer la progression, l’économie et l’organisation du chantier, les méthodes de l’archéométrie permettent, lorsque les matériaux chronologiquement significatifs sont conservés, d’obtenir une datation absolue.
Dans les efforts déployés pour la compréhension de l’édifice et l’établissement de datations scientifiquement argumentées, l’apport de l’image tend à être sous-estimé, voire négligé: de nature interprétative, le style et l’iconographie apparaissent parfois comme des indices de moindre valeur objective. Forts de l’idée que les « savoir-faire » et les « vouloir-dire » sont tout autant révélateurs de l’histoire des édifices, nous nous proposons ici de démontrer que sa pleine et juste compréhension ne peut être obtenue que par le croisement des indices, dans une approche multi- et pluri-disciplinaire.
Dans le cadre de ce colloque les différents acteurs de la recherche sur le monument sont appelés à partager leurs expériences, acquises autour d’un ensemble de monuments ou d’un cas particulier dont la complexité rend nécessaire le croisement des regards. L’intervention concertée des historiens de l’art et de l’architecture, archéologues du bâti, épigraphistes, spécialistes des techniques et des matériaux démontrera la nécessité d’une synergie des disciplines pour mieux comprendre les monuments et obtenir des datations fiables, contribuant ainsi au renouvellement de la recherche dans notre domaine.

Université de Lausanne, bâtiment Extranef, salle 125

Jeudi 25 octobre 2018

Introduction

9h00-9h30
Accueil des participants

Président de séances: Mathieu Piavaux

9h30-10h15
Nicolas Reveyron: introduction et historiographie / le cas de Cluny III

10h15-11h00
Jean Wirth : Pour une approche multidisciplinaire du monument

11h00-11h30
Pause café (salle 221)

11h30-12h00
Barbara Franzé : Saint-Gilles-du-Gard

12h00-12h30
Discussion sur les présentations de la matinée

12h30-14h00
Déjeûner

Après-midi

Président de séances: Nicolas Reveyron

14h00-15h00
Lei Huang et Térence Le Deschault de Monredon : Sainte-Foy de Conques

15h00-15h30
Elodie Leschot: la façade sculptée de Charlieu

15h30-16h00
Pause café

16h00-17h30
La cathédrale de Strasbourg (bras sud du transept) et le passage du roman au gothique
Marc C. Schurr et Ilona Dudzinski

17h30-18h30
Discussions sur les présentations de l’après-midi

Vendredi 26 octobre

Matin. Présidence de séances: Marc C. Schurr

09h00-11h00
Pour un croisement des regards. La datation des collégiales du diocèse de Liège (XIIe-XVe s.)
Equipe dirigée par Mathieu Piavaux (Namur)
Antoine Baudry, Frans Doperé, Patrick Hoffsummer, Aline Wilmet

11.00-11h30: Pause café

11h30-13.00
Approches pluridisciplinaires des monastères aquitains
Equipe dirigée par Christian Gensbeitel
Philippe Lanos, Jean-Baptiste Javel

13h00-15h00 Pause de midi
.
Après-midi. Président de séance: Barbara Franzé

15.00-15.30
La tour-porche de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe
Laura Acosta Jacob

15.30-17.00
Dal sepolcro alla basilica : culti e monumenti nell’Abruzzo medievale
Equipe dirigée par Gaetano Curzi
Maria Carla Somma, Carlo Tedeschi.

17.00-17.30 Pause café

17.30-18.30
Discussion sur la session de l’après-midi/de la journée

Samedi 27 octobre

9h30-12h00
Table ronde
Avec la participation de Laurence Terrier Aliferis, Jacques Bujard et Michel Fuchs.

Call for Applications: Seminars on periodization in the history of art, New Europe College, Bucharest

New Europe College, Bucharest
Deadline: Nov 30, 2018

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
for a series of three one-week seminars on periodization in the history of art to take place at the New Europe College-Institute for Advanced Study in BucharestA program supported by the Getty Foundation as part of its Connecting Art Histories initiative

We propose a series of three seminars of one-week duration each on periodization and related issues in the history of art, whose addressees are to be early-career art historians from East-Central Europe, and which would include a number of invited guest speakers, from this region, and outside it. Though a sense that the conventional periodizations are in need of revision can be detected earlier, a more pointed reflection on this topic can be noticed after the demise of communism and the dismantling of the colonial system. In the aftermath of the 1989 events in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, a number of scholars felt the pressing need to reconsider the place of local art histories within the established narratives, and to reflect on how these local histories might fit within the Western canon, or to question its authority.

This series of seminars aims, on the one hand, to address questions that are (or so we deem) of interest to art historians in the countries of East-Central Europe in ways that would counter a piece-meal approach, mostly dictated by national borders, in favor of a more unified one, and would provide an opportunity to identify common concerns, and perhaps also case studies that could (or should) encourage cross-border collaboration. A broad framework for researching art historical narratives in the region on a comparative basis is still lacking. There is also limited cross-cultural knowledge at the level of curricula and teaching methodologies. In universities across the region Western Art is researched and taught mostly according to the established periodization and categories (the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, historical avant-gardes, contemporary art etc.). Should it, and could it be taught differently? There is less consensus regarding the same categories in Eastern and Central Europe, which is not a homogenous cultural entity. Can such a consensus be reached? In what ways would this prove productive?

STRUCTURE AND CONTENT
The Program will consist of a series of three one-week seminars with the participation of up to 20 early career scholars from East-Central Europe, up to 4 keynote/guest speakers, the Coordinator and the Consultants.
During each of the seminars we would expect about a third among the participants to present their work in progress on a case study, which would make for six-seven papers in all. Scholars presenting papers will be identified in advance (and their agreement to do so secured), and papers will be – whenever possible – circulated before the seminar among the participants, so as to make possible a productive, in-depth discussion.

Dates:
– First seminar: mid-May 2019;
– Second seminar: first half of November 2019;
– Third seminar: last week of May 2020

Guest speakers:
Zdenka BADOVINAC, curator and writer, since 1993 Director of the Museum of Modern Art in Ljubljana;

Mieke BAL, Professor of Theory of Literature and founding Director of the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA), University of Amsterdam;

Patrick FLORES, Professor of Art Studies at the Department of Art Studies at the University of the Philippines, Curator of the Vargas Museum in Manila, and Adjunct Curator at the National Art Gallery, Singapore;

Andrea GIUNTA, Professor of Art History at the Universidad de Buenos Aires and former Chair in Latin American Art History and Criticism at UT Austin;

Krista KODRES, Professor at the Institute of Art History and Visual Culture of the Estonian Academy of Arts, Tallinn, and Head of the Doctoral Curriculum in Art History;

Saloni MATHUR, Professor, Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art, Department of Art History, UCLA;

Matthew RAMPLEY, Professor, Department of Art History, Curating and Visual Studies, Chair of Art History, University of Birmingham;

Miodrag ŠUVAKOVIĆ, Professor of Theory of Art and Theory of Culture at the Transdisciplinary Master and Doctoral Studies at the Faculty of Media and Communication, University of Arts in Belgrade;

Christopher WOOD, Professor and Chair, Department of German, New York University (Affiliated Faculty, Department of Comparative Literature and Institute of Fine Arts).

ELIGIBILITY
The program targets early-career art historians from Central and Eastern European countries. They should hold a PhD or be in a demonstrably advanced stage of work on the thesis and be citizens of one of the former socialist states in East-Central Europe or of the post-Soviet republics. Once selected, the applicants are expected to take part in the whole series of seminars.

Travel, accommodation and meals will be arranged and covered by the organizing institution.

HOW TO APPLY
Applications will be submitted in electronic format only, to the address:
applications@nec.ro

Candidates are asked to enter in the Subject field of their e-mail message “Periodizationseminar series”.

There is no application form for this program. More information regarding the documents that the application should contain can be found on the following webpage:

http://www.nec.ro/data/pdfs/public-events/2018/october/Call%20for%20applications%20(4).pdf

The deadline for the submission of applications is November 30.

The results of the selection process will be communicated by February 15

CFP: Conquest and Construction: Architecture and Landscapes in the Medieval Mediterranean, Architecture Space and Society Research Centre, Birkbeck (University of London), March 1, 2019

CFP deadline: Monday 3 December 2018

Much recent scholarship on the medieval Mediterranean focuses on shifting borders and cultural identities. Conquest is one of the causes of such shifts. This one-day symposium will examine how the consequences of conquests were manifested in conquered cities and landscapes, asking how conquerors responded to their new environments and how conquered communities were built and re-built.

Papers might touch on any of the following in relation to conquest, conquerors or conquered territories in the Mediterranean world, in the period 500 – 1500.

  • Architecture
  • Space, landscape, urbanism, topographies
  • Architectural sculpture and decoration
  • Sacred and liturgical spaces
  • Destruction of architecture and urbanism
  • Spoliation and re-use of building materials
  • Cross-cultural exchanges through buildings, cities and landscapes
  • Conquerors as builders and patrons of architecture
  • Castles and defensive architecture
  • Written descriptions of conquered landscapes

Papers are welcome on all areas of the Mediterranean world (including the Islamic, Byzantine and Latin areas, Jewish communities, the crusades and border zones).

Please send proposals for 20-minute papers to Clare Vernon (c.vernon@bbk.ac.uk), by Monday 3 December 2018, including a paper title, an abstract (max 300 words) and contact details.

 

 

 

 

CFP: Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and Scale in Medieval Art, 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium, The Courtauld Institute of Art, February 8, 2019

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider issues and opportunities encountered by medieval artists and viewers in relation to size and scale.

Deadline: 16 November 2018

From micro-architectural reliquaries and minute boxwood prayer beads to colossal sculpture and the built spaces of grand cathedrals and civic structures, size mattered in medieval art. Examples of simple one-upmanship between the castles and palaces of lords and kings and the churches and cathedrals of abbots and bishops are numerous. How big to make it was a principal concern for both patrons and makers of medieval art. Scale could be manipulated to dramatic effect in the manufacture of manuscripts and the relative disposition of elements within their decorative programmes. Divine proportions – of the Temple of Solomon or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre – were evoked in the specific measurements and configuration of contemporary buildings and decisions were made based on concern with numbers and number sequences.

Inspired by the ‘Russian doll’ relationship between the Sainte Chapelle in Paris and its micro-architectural miniature in the form of a gilded reliquary in the Musée de Cluny, Scaling the Middle Ages seeks to explore a range of questions surrounding proportion, scale, size, and measurement in relation to medieval art and architecture. The Sainte Chapelle, built by the saint-king of France Louis IX to house the relics of Christ’s Passion, is itself often described as an over-sized reliquary turned inside-out. The Cluny reliquary – made to house relics of Saints Maxien, Lucien, and Julien held within the chapel – both complicates and compliments that comparison, at once shrinking the chapel back down to size through close architectural quotation of its form in miniature and pointing the viewer’s attention back to that same, larger space. The relationship between these two artefacts raises a host of questions, including:

Scale and making

  • How were ideas about size and scale communicated between patrons, architects, craftspeople, and artists? In an age without universal standardised units of measurement, how did craftsmen negotiate problems of scale and proportion?
  • How were the measurements of a medieval building determined? What techniques did architects, masons, and artists use to determine the scale of their work?

Scale and meaning

  • What effects were achieved and what responses evoked by the manipulation of scale, from the minute to the massive, in medieval art?
  • What was the role of proportion and scale in architectural ‘copies’ or quotations?
  • What representational problems were encountered by artists approaching out-sized subjects, such as giants?
  • How was scale manipulated in order to communicate hierarchy or relative importance in medieval art?
  • How did size and scale function in competition between patrons or communities in their artistic commissions and built environments?

Problems of scale

  • What, if anything, happened when something was the wrong size? When was something too big, or too small? And how were such problems solved by patrons and makers?
  • How does the disembodied viewing of medieval art through digital surrogates distort or assist in our perception of scale?
  • How can modern measuring techniques and digital technology enhance our understanding of medieval objects and buildings?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these and related issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing buildings and objects from across the Middle Ages (broadly understood in geographical and chronological terms). The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research.

To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a CV, to teresa.lane@courtauld.ac.uk and oliver.mitchell@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 16 November 2018.

Organised by Oliver Mitchell and Teresa Lane (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Click here for more information: