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CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)

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Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

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Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

Fortnightly Thursdays 17:30, IHR Wolfson II unless noted; free, all welcome

Winter Term
29th September ** Senate House South Block Room 349 (3rd Floor)**
Chris Wickham (Oxford): Jiangnan style: Doing global economic history in the medieval period

13th October
Giorgio Lizzul (KCL): The republic, commerce, and public debt in the forged orations of Doge Tommaso Mocenigo

Kenneth Duggan (KCL): The limits of strong government: Attempts to control criminality in thirteenth-century England

27th October (jointly with History of Liturgy seminar)
Cecilia Gaposchkin (Dartmouth & UCL): Liturgy and devotion in the aftermath of the FourthCrusade: Nivelon of Soissons, the relics of 1204, and the cathedral of Soissons

10th November
Andrew Jotischky (Royal Holloway): The image of the Greek: Western views of orthodox monks and monasteries, c.1000-1500

24th November
Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg): Military expatriation to Muslim lands: Aragonese Christian mercenaries as trans-imperial subjects in the Late Middle Ages

8th December (** Senate House Room 246 **)
Justine Firnhaber-Baker (St Andrews): Who were the Jacques and what did they want? Social networks and community mobilization in the Jacquerie of 1358

Spring Term 2017

18th January (jointly with Earlier Middle Ages Seminar, **time & venue to be confirmed**)
Roundtable discussion of Cathars in Question ed. Antonio Sennis (Boydell & Brewer, 2016)

19th January (** Senate House, The Court Room**)
Sylvain Piron (EHESS): An individual institutionalization: Opicino de Canestris (1296– c.1354)

2nd February
Nicholas Vincent (UEA): Henry II’s Irish colony: Truth and fiction

16th February
Dominique Iogna-Prat (CNRS/EHESS): A stone church? Visibility, monumentality and spatiality of the Medieval Church (500-1500)

2nd March
Ella Kilgallon (QMUL): Visualising castitas in the Franciscan tradition: An analysis of three frescoes from central Italy

Ella Williams (UCL): History and prophecy in Naples: The Faits des Romains at the court of KingRobert ‘the Wise’

16th March
Jonathan Lyon (Chicago): Offices, officials and bureaucracy in late medieval Europe: The view from Germany

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL); IHR page http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/114.

Contact: John Sabapathy & Alice Taylor (j.sabapathy@ucl.ac.uk & alice.taylor@kcl.ac.uk).

CFP: Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers

hypnerotomachia-poliphili_1Call for Journal Submissions: Kunsttexte – Renaissance 2016: “Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers”
Deadline: Nov 1, 2016

Some major publishers dominated the publishing scene in the
Renaissance, like Aldo Manuzio and his family in Venice, and the Giunti
family in Florence. From early on however there were many minor
publishers, often very engaged, but successful only for a few years.
These were often intellectuals, who followed special interests in their
publishing policy. In Florence there was Anton Francesco Doni, member
of the literary academy, who published his own works, but also those of
his academy fellows, for example the lessons they presented in the
Academy. His engagement did not lead to financial success and after a
few years he had to stop. In Venice Francesco Sansovino was a
likeminded, who published his own works as well and those of his
friends, and some literary editions. There are numerous examples of
private engagement in printing. We invite papers, which present in an
exemplary way minor printers in the Renaissance (in Italy, France,
Spain, Germany), concentrating on their formation, their printing
policy, their outreach and influence.

How to submit: The articles are due on November 1, 2016, but a short note of interest
would be welcome beforehand.  Papers are welcome in German, English,
French, Italian or Spanish. For more information about the open access
online journal Kunsttexte and for the author guidelines please look at
www.kunsttexte.de.
Please send inquiries and proposals to
Angela Dressen (adressen@itatti.harvard.edu)
Susanne Gramatzki (gramatz@uni-wuppertal.de)

CFP: Various Sessions @Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, May 11 – 14, 2017

Call for Papers: Various Sessions @Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, May 11 – 14, 2017
Deadline: Sep 15, 2016

Reminder:
The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture
Light and Darkness in Medieval Art, 1200-1450. ICMA sponsored

session

Other Sessions:

Obscured by the Alps: Medieval Italian Architecture and the
European Canon
800px-cathedrale_de_sienne_28duomo_di_siena29Organizer: Erik Gustafson (edg218@nyu.edu)

The traditional canon of European architecture has been well established through both formal-stylistic aesthetics and periodized criteria, rooted ultimately in Hegelian notions of the underlying spirit of an age and Modern nationalist identities. Viewed from northern Europe, the canon’s trajectory moves fluidly from the halcyon
days of Greece and Rome to the stunted but ambitious Early Christian and Byzantine era, developing into the solidly reliable Romanesque
until the revolution of the transcendent Gothic is decapitated by the Renaissance counter-revolution and its florescent Baroque iteration, to
be overshadowed by the enlightened and reasoned Neoclassical age,
leading to the search for identity of the 19th century Historicist
styles and the return to the classically pure clarity of Modernism.
The contributions of the Italian peninsula are periodic, and are
generally defined within the canon by returns to classicism.  In recent
decades, architectural historians have begun to challenge the Italian
canon, expanding its geographic scope from the old Rome-Florence-Venice
vector while also undermining chronological waypoints such as the
Medieval-Renaissance divide.  The canon, however, remains infrangible,
still underwritten by the formalist priorities established at its
inception.

This session seeks to examine the utility of the European canon in
assessing the historical significance of Italian medieval architecture.
Is there more to Italian architectural history than recurrent bouts of
classicism?  How can Italian architecture be understood positively
within the European context, rather than in opposition or subjection to
the canonical narratives?  Possible avenues of inquiry might include
exploring the historiographical lacunae of the canon, considering
alternative criteria for structuring new canonical narratives,
examining socio-cultural phenomena otherwise elided by the canon, or
investigating other historically contingent trends which reflect
different scholarly treatments of Italy and the north.  Medieval
architectural history has been “rethought” several times in the past
decade, bringing “new approaches” to old questions.  Shifting the
discussion, this session seeks papers that ask broad new questions
about medieval architecture’s place in the history of European culture,
grounding such investigations in local Italian contexts. While Italy
has long been obscured by the Alps, this session seeks to begin new
conversations about medieval architecture driven by Italian challenges
to canonical understandings.

How to Submit: Please submit a paper proposal to the organizer, Erik Gustafson
(edg218@nyu.edu)
Deadline: September 15, 2016
Please include the following materials in your application:
1) A one-page abstract
2) Completed Participant Information Form available at the website of
the Medieval Congress:
http://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions
3) A one-page CV

tumblr_m2du3bavab1qkpbfc1The Matter of Ornament
Organizer: Ashley Jones, University of Florida

Ornament has long occupied a troubled position in the history of
western art. Subject to rising and falling fashions, it has been beset
from all sides. Derided as feminine and dismissed as superficial,
ornament has been defined against both classical and modern
austerities. Medieval ornament, like so much of medieval art, has acted
as foil in the grand narratives of the rise and fall of figuration and
abstraction. But broader trends in the history of art and material
culture have, in recent years, highlighted the role medieval objects,
with their simultaneously heightened physicality and spirituality, can
play in illuminating profound questions of the nature of matter and
representation. This panel seeks to add ornament – arguably a
fundamental mode of premodern abstraction – to that equation. It
invites papers drawn from both material and textual traditions that
investigate the intersections of materiality, representationality, and
ornamentality in medieval material culture. Possible topics include but
are not limited to questions of the way in which matter gives rise to
ornament; the way in which matter, such as sacred relics, is made
legible through ornamentation; and the ways in which medieval ornament
evokes both the matter of nature and the matter of the cosmos.

How to Submit:  Paper proposals should consist of the following:
– Abstract of proposed paper (no more than 350 words)
– Completed Participant Information Form – available on the conference
website here:
https://wmich.edu/sites/default/files/attachments/u434/2016/medieval-pif-2017.pdf
– CV with contact information.
ALL PROPOSALS AND INQUIRIES SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO:
Ashley Jones (ajones@arts.ufl.edu)

0cf1189eec15ef93a0058320d627e312The Schematization of time
This session proposes to investigate visual strategies used in
time-reckoning and calendar constructions. Medieval illustrations of
scientific works, computus treatises (including Bede’s De temporum
ratione), historical chronicles, almanacs and moral and theological
tracts, display a vast spectrum of images dealing with the natural and
divine causes of time phenomena, their manifestations, their various
effects on the world and their universal significations. These images
testify to a wide range of subjects and interests, from cosmological
and astronomical explanations, to practical considerations regarding
liturgy, astrology, medicine, divination, prognostication, to history
and geography, to practical and speculative mathematics, and to
symbolic devices working as visual exegesis of the creation. Given the
rich corpus of source material, how might the visualization of time
through schematization and volvelles help us understand the role of
time in medieval life and culture? How did schemata and diagrams
represent specific strategies of knowledge transmission through
geometrical relationships, color systems, and numerical and spatial
representations? Although modern medieval studies witness an increasing
interest in schemata and diagrams, the omnipresence and diversity of
visual reflexions on time in the Middle Ages contrasts with the small
number of case studies dedicated to the subject.

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the
visualization of relationships between time, space and matter; the
schmatization of time in medical theory and practice; the depiction of
liturgical time; the correlation between time-reckoning and celestial
phenomena, either astronomical or astrological; the calculation of past
and future dates through images concerning chronology and eschatology.

How to Apply: The panel features 15-20 minutes papers. Please send an abstract (150
to 350 words), a short CV and completed Participant Information Form to
Arthur Hénaff (arthur.henaff@etu.ephe.fr) and Sarah Griffin
(sarah.griffin@kellogg.ox.ac.uk) by September 15, 2016

ICMA: GRADUATE STUDENT TRAVEL GRANTS

OrvietoThe ICMA has initiated a new form of grant for graduate students in the early stages of their dissertation research.  Three grants will be awarded this year, at $3,000 each, to enable a student to travel to Europe (including the Eastern Mediterranean) to visit the monuments or museum objects or manuscripts on which the dissertation will be based.  The grant is designed to cover one month of travel. The ICMA will contact institutions and/or individuals in the area to be visited; these will help the student gain access to the relevant material and aid in other practical matters.

 

The grant is designed primarily for the student who has finished the preliminary exams, and is in the process of formulating a dissertation topic.  Students who have already submitted a proposal, but are still very early on in the process of their research, may also apply.

All applicants must be ICMA members. (click here to join/renew)

Applicants must submit:

  1.  Outline of the thesis proposal in 800 words or less.
  2.  Detailed outline of exactly what the student would like to see on his/her travels, and how this relates to the proposed thesis topic.

3.    Proposed budget (airfare, lodging, other travel, per diem).

  1. Letter from the thesis advisor, clarifying where the student stands in his/her graduate career, and explaining the relevance of the trip to the thesis.

Upon return, the student will be required to submit a letter and financial report to the ICMA and a narrative to the student section of the newsletter.

Applications are due by 1 March 2016. The ICMA will announce the winners of the three grants by 13 May 2016.

Please submit materials as PDF attachments to Ryan Frisinger at awards@medievalart.org with “Student Travel Grant” in the subject line.

 

 

CFP: Dialogue and Difference in the Middle Ages (University of Bristol, February 25-6, 2016)

sageandfool-283pxDialogue and Difference is an interdisciplinary conference bringing together scholars from all fields to explore the ways in which cultural, social, political, religious, scientific and intellectual exchange and interaction unfolded throughout the Middle Ages. Dialogues took place both across borderlines and within the heart of medieval societies, in monasteries, universities, courts and market places as well as on battlefields and high-roads. How did these dialogues shape the societies of the Middle Ages, and how did new ideas, people and cultures interact with old? Did difference lead to conflict, or to coexistence?

This conference aims to explore these issues across societies from medieval Europe, Byzantium, the Near East and beyond, and spanning from Late Antiquity to the 16th century.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • societies built on cultural, political and religious borders
  • inter-religious dialogue and polemic
  • the emergence of the university
  • conquest and colonisation
  • heresy and reform
  • inter and intra-textual dialogues
  • gender and the body
  • technological or scientific developments
  • conversion and assimilation
  • material histories and the dialogue of artefacts

Postgraduate and early-career researchers are invited to submit abstracts of 200-300 words for 20 minute papers

We are also accepting abstracts of 100 words for 10 minute flash papers, or 100 words for poster presentations

All abstracts are to be submitted by Wednesday 25th November 2015 to Sophie and Teresa, at: sophie.burton@bristol.ac.uk and teresa.witcombe@bristol.ac.uk

For all additional information, please contact:sophie.burton@bristol.ac.uk and teresa.witcombe@bristol.ac.uk

10 Postdoctoral Fellowships: Europe in the Middle East, The Middle East in Europe

10 Postdoctoral Fellowships: Europe in the Middle East, The Middle East in Europe
Berlin
Deadline: 15 January 2014

Bassin_Syrie_1The Berlin-based Forum Transregionale Studien invites scholars to apply for up to ten postdoctoral fellowships for the research program EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST – THE MIDDLE EAST IN EUROPE (EUME).

EUME seeks to rethink key concepts and premises that link and divide Europe and the Middle East. The program draws on the international expertise of scholars in and outside of Germany and is embedded in university and extra-university research institutions in Berlin. It supports historical-critical philology, rigorous engagement with the literatures of the Middle East and their histories, the social history of cities and the study of Middle Eastern political and philosophical thought (Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and secular) as central fields of research not only for area or cultural studies, but also for European intellectual history and other academic disciplines. The program explores modernity as a historical space and conceptual frame.

The program puts emphasis on three programmatic ideas:
1) supporting research that demonstrates the rich and complex historical legacies and entanglements between Europe and the Middle East
2) reexamining genealogical notions of mythical ‘beginnings’, ‘origins’, and ‘purity’ in relation to culture and society
3) rethinking key concepts of a shared modernity in light of contemporary cultural, social, and political entanglements that supersede identity discourses as well as national, cultural or regional canons and epistemologies that were established in the nineteenth century.

The fellowships are intended primarily for scholars of art history, history, literature, philology, political philosophy, political science, religion and sociology who want to carry out their research projects in connection with the Berlin program. Applicants should be at the postdoctoral level and should have obtained their doctorate within the last seven years. Fellows gain the opportunity to pursue research projects of their own choice within the framework of one of the above-mentioned research fields and in relation to the overall program ‘Europe in the Middle East – the Middle East in Europe’. Successful applicants will be fellows of EUME at the Forum Transregionale Studien and associate members of one of the university or non-university research institutes listed below.

As a rule, the fellowships start on 1 October 2014 and will end on 31 July 2015. Postdoctoral fellows will receive a monthly stipend of 2.500 € plus supplement depending on their personal situation. Organisational support regarding visa, insurances, housing, etc. will be provided. Fellows are obliged to work in Berlin and to help shape the seminars and working discussions related to their research field. The working language of EUME is English.

EUME supports and builds upon the following interconnected research fields:

CITIES COMPARED: URBAN CHANGE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AND ADJACENT REGIONS
This research group is directed by Ulrike Freitag and Nora Lafi, both of the Zentrum Moderner Orient, Berlin. It contributes to the debate on plurality, citizenship and civil society from the historical experience of conviviality and socio-cultural, ethnic, and religious differences in the cities around the Mediterranean;

ISLAMIC DISCOURSE CONTESTED: MIDDLE EASTERN AND EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVES
is directed by Gudrun Kraemer, Institute for Islamic Studies, Freie Universitaet Berlin. It analyzes modern Middle Eastern thought in the framework of discourses on modernity, secularity, and justice;

PERSPECTIVES ON THE QUR’AN: NEGOTIATING DIFFERENT VIEWS OF A SHARED HISTORY
is directed by Angelika Neuwirth, Seminar for Arabic Studies, Freie Universitaet Berlin, and Stefan Wild, Universitaet Bonn. This research group situates the foundational text of Islam within the religious and literary landscape of late antiquity, early Islamic History and Arabic philology, and combines a historicization of its genesis with an analysis of its hermeneutics, its reception and perception in Europe and the Middle East;

TRAVELLING TRADITIONS: COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON NEAR EASTERN LITERATURES
is directed by Friederike Pannewick, Centrum fuer Nah- und Mitteloststudien, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, and Samah Selim, Rutgers University. This research group reassesses literary entanglements and processes of canonization between Europe and the Middle East.

TRADITION AND THE CRITIQUE OF MODERNITY: SECULARISM, FUNDAMENTALISM AND RELIGION FROM MIDDLE EASTERN PERSPECTIVES
is a special forum, directed by Amnon Raz-Krakotzkin, Ben-Gurion University, that attempts to rethink key concepts of modernity like secularity, tradition, or religion in the context of the experiences, interpretations, and critiques of Jews, Arabs, and Muslims in the Middle East and in Europe.

A new field of research that attempts to bridge the gap between political science approaches and cultural studies will be developed during the coming year. It will be directed by Cilja Harders, Otto-Suhr-Institut fuer Politikwissenschaft, Freie Universitaet Berlin, and Rachid Ouaissa, Political Science Departement, Centrum für Nah- und Mittelost-Studien, Philipps-Universität Marburg.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE”

An application should be made in explicit relation to one of the research fields and consist of
– a curriculum vitae,
– a project description (no longer than 5 pages), stating what the scholar will work on in Berlin if granted a fellowship)
– a sample of scholarly work (maximum 20 pages from an article, conference paper, or dissertation chapter)
– a letter of recommendation by one university instructor (that can be sent by as a separate e-mail).

The application should be submitted by e-mail as four separate PDF files in English and should be received by 15 January 2014, sent in to: eume@trafo-berlin.de

For information on the research institutions in Berlin participating in EUME, please visit:
– Berlin Graduate School of Muslim Cultures and Societies, FU Berlin
– Center for Middle Eastern and North African Politics, FU Berlin
– Corpus Coranicum, Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities
– Zentrum Moderner Orient
– Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of Literary Studies, FU Berlin
– Institute for Islamic Studies, FU Berlin
– Museum for Islamic Art
– Seminar for Arabic Studies, FU Berlin