Category Archives: Call for Papers

CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)
How to Apply: Proposals for either 3-paper sessions or individual papers will be equally welcome. Individual papers should be 20 minutes in length. Please submit an abstract of no more that 250 words and a brief CV to mem2017@fcsh.unl.pt
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

NB: Conference Registration Fees:
Participation with Paper: 75€ (Registration fee includes documentation and coffee-breaks);
• Attendance: 30€ for the general public and 25€ for students;
• Gala Dinner: 35€.

In December, as the third year of its six-year Strategic Project draws to a close, the Institute for Medieval Studies – whose research groups have been working around our main theme, “People and Knowledge in Motion: Medieval Portugal in Trans-European Networks” – is hosting a Conference aimed at bringing together scholars from around the world in order to discuss and reassess the research undertaken in the Institute and in the wider academic world on mobility, the circulation of models, and phenomena of a global nature during the Middle Ages. In the course of the last three years, researchers specialising in the areas of History, History of Art, Archaeology and Literature, have developed their research with a strong emphasis on the question of the circulation of men and women, ideas, models and artefacts as mirrors of a medieval reality in which
mental, symbolic and physical mobility seems to correspond less and less to the ancient perceptions and stereotypes of Medieval Men and Society as characterized by stillness and immutability. Furthermore, work in the Institute has raised additional questions and problems intimately connected with the topics being studied, but also very much in line with current historiographical trends. For this reason, the organizers of the 4th International Conference on Medieval Europe in Motion deemed it appropriate to take our principal concern a step further and propose as its main subject the question whether or not it is possible to speak of a Global Middle Ages.
The Conference will seek to provide a forum for scholars from all disciplines who are willing to examine this topic. We invite participation from graduate students, early-career researchers and senior scholars. Papers are warmly welcome whether in English, Portuguese, Spanish, French or Italian.
The three sections of the Conference will be:
1. Debating the Global Middle Ages: Theoretical and Historiographical Approaches;
2. Texts, Images and Representations;
3. Territories and Powers: a “Glocal” Perspective.
Possible topics may include, but are by no means restricted to, the following:
• approaches to sub-global, semi-global and pan-global concepts and the discussion of contact,
exchange, interaction, circulation, integration and exclusion;
• analysis of concepts and case studies concerning diffusion, outreach, dispersal and expansion;
• approaches to concepts of impact, reception, acceptance, transformation and reform.
Selected proceedings will be edited by the Institute of Medieval Studies, as a peer-reviewed e-book, during the course of 2018.

 

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Aguilar de Campoo, Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017 (VII Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis)

fsmlrph_capitelmonasterio_rom_cvalle

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de Campo (SPAIN), Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017.

CFP for 20-minute ‘free papers’ open until 30 June 2017
How to apply:
send an email with name, Academic institution, 1 page abstract and main bibliography to plhuerta@santamarialareal.org

How to enrol in the conference: email: plhuerta@santamarialareal.org
Price:
Regular 125 € Reduced 90 € Special (students) 60 €

In his The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, the sociologist Émile Durkheim formulated the idea that the division of the world into two domains is the distinctive feature of religious thought, one containing the sacred and the other all that is profane. Durkheim’s distinction cannot be applied to medieval art, however, in which the mixing of secular motifs in religious objects, images, and architecture was characteristic –at least not without complicating the theoretical notion. The senmurf on the eleventh-century reliquary of St. Matthew in SS. Cosma e Damiano in Rome, the figure copied from Orestes on the ancient Husillos sarcophagus above the altar at Fromista, a fragment of victory killing a barbarian from a consular diptych re-used on a 11th/12th century book cover, and the incorporation of diagrams and motifs from natural science in the “aula gotica” in SS. Quattro Coronati in Rome are among myriad examples that document why this is the case.

In one of the best-known texts related to medieval art, Bernard of Clairvaux railed against the imaginative variety of profane art displayed in twelfth-century Cluniac monasteries, which he considered to be a subversion of the moral order of monastic life. Bernard’s diatribe not only confirms the fact that linking the two realms was common but also raises the question of audience and hence also spatiality. As the anthropologist E. E. Evans-Pritchard postulated, sacredness (and therefore the profane) might be considered as situational, in a chronological as well as in a spatial sense. An object considered sacred in a given period may be considered profane or magical in a different time and/or space; decontextualization and reuse are thus also important issues related to the topic. Profane does not always imply anti-sacred. Indeed, given the fact that profanus means “in front of the consecrated enclosure,” the inclusion of secular elements within sacred domains suggests a dynamic interweaving that extends beyond the mere incorporation of motifs and objects. Sometimes the contacts between the two domains was regulated by rites that provided the conditions within which the relationship was made possible (i.e. consecration); other times, as when natural science was assimilated into the choice and manufacture of materials, the overlapping of sacred and profane underlies the processes of art.

In recent decades, historians have explored the uses of subversive elements in sacred art –from marginalia in illuminated manuscripts to coin-imagery and stamping incorporated in Eucharistic hosts. The conference Ars Mediaevalis 2017 sets out to assess the results of the advances made by the new art historiography and, more important, to open up still-unmapped paths for future study of the profane within the sacred during the Middle Ages.

Programme:

Friday, 29th September
Aguilar de Campoo

09.45h : Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis Opening
Chair: Francesca Español UB

10.00h Michele Bacci, Université de Fribourg – Intrusos en los iconos: perspectivas comparativas sobre los retratos individuales en la iconografia sagrada
10.45h Discussion

11.45h Philippe Cordez, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Le repentir d’un magicien ? Les camées de la statuette de David à la cathédrale de Bâle (vers 1320)
12.30h Free paper
12.50h Discussion

16.00h Fernado Villansenor, Universidad de Cantabria – Lo profano y sus espacios: discursos marginales en la Castilla tardogótica
16.45h Javier Docampo, Biblioteca Nacional de España – Las representaciones de los trabajos de los meses en libros de horas: la construcción de un imaginario social
17.15 Discussion

17.45 Round table. “Profano: perímetros espaciales, iconicos y semanticos en el arte medieval / Profane: spatial, iconic, and semantic edges in medieval art” Gerardo Boto.

18.45 Public presentation of the new editorial series “Ars Mediaevalis. Estudios de arte medieval”

Saturday, 30th September
Palencia

(Chair: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños UVA)

10.00h Kathrin Müller, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main Subversive – Devices: Cosmological Diagrams and the Problem of the Sacred
10.45h Free paper
11.05h Discussion

12.00h Beate Fricke, Universität Bern – Representing the Cosmos’ Origins, illuminating cosmological thoughts
12.45h Free paper
13.05h Discussion
16.00h Academic visit: Burgos: Santa María de las Huelgas Reales; Cartuja de Miraflores

Sunday, October 1st
Agilar de Campoo

(Chair: Javier Martínez Aguirre UCM)

09.15h Milagros Guardia, Universitat de Barcelona – Las pinturas murales de Sant Joan de Boi: de como contextualizar la iconografia profana
10.00h Free paper
10.20h Discussion
11.20h Free paper

11.40h Herbert L. Kessler, Johns Hopkins University / Masaryk University – From Vanitas to Veritas: the Profane as a Fifth Mode of Seeing
12.20h Discussion

13.00h Conclusions and perspectives
13.15h Closing ceremony

 

CFP: Recovering the Past (York N/EMICS), 2-3 June 2017

Recovering the past can be an arduous and treacherous task and modern scholars frequently find themselves indebted to those who have gone before them. This multi-disciplinary two-day conference sets out to celebrate and analyse the impact the work of previous generations has had on our understanding of the Medieval past. For example, from the mid-nineteenth century onwards there appears to have been an increased interest in cataloguing and preserving the sculpture of the early Medieval period by figures such as John Romilly Allen and Joseph Anderson, whose seminal work The Early Christian Monuments of Scotland, published in 1903, is still the most complete record of the sculpture of early Medieval Scotland and was an influencing factor behind the creation of the British Academy Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture (which published its twelfth volume in 2016), the key text for any scholar working on Anglo-Saxon monumental sculpture and ecclesiastical / secular patronage of the arts in the early Middle Ages. This recording and cataloguing of the past can also been seen during the Medieval period itself with the collation of earlier oral poetry being preserved in manuscripts, such as the ninth-century poem Genesis B preserved within the c. 1000 Bodleian Junius 11 manuscript-version of the near contemporary poem Genesis.

Wider examples of recovering the past include, but are not limited to: recovering the past given the issues surrounding the accuracy/authenticity of primary sources; excavation and/or scientific analysis, the insights these provide and the issues surrounding the findings; the recovery of lost or stolen artefacts during the Medieval period and beyond; highlighting the skewing of the past through the editing of texts since the later sixteenth century, the production of fakes, the re-carving of sculpture; highlighting the use and manipulation of the past to support nationalistic/religious arguments; the varying interests of antiquarians and early historians; as well as museology and the questions surrounding how we engage with and display the Medieval past.

This conference will bring together emerging scholars, early career researchers and established academics from a variety of disciplines to provide a platform to discuss how this important idea was manifested in the textual, visual and material evidence of the Medieval world and beyond. It aims to examine the implications and the significance of ‘recovering the past’ in its widest possible contexts.

Possible subjects include but are not limited to:

  • Antiquarianism and/or the recording and cataloguing of the Medieval past
  • Historiographies
  • Archaeological investigations
  • Stolen and/or recovered artefacts
  • The creation of fakes: including the re-carving of sculpture and the ‘editing’ of texts
  • Reconstructing fragmentary texts, narratives or objects
  • The recording of the oral tradition during the Medieval period and beyond
  • Issues surrounding the accuracy/authenticity of primary source material
  • Museology and the displaying of the Medieval past

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words (with a short biography) to Elizabeth Alexander (ea502@york.ac.uk) by 17 Feburary 2017.

For Further information on the Northern/Early Medieval Interdisciplinary Conference Series please see our website: northernemics.wordpress.com.

CFP: Hybrids and Hybridity (University of Reading, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies), 20-21 April 2017

screen-shot-2017-01-26-at-11-14-18-amThe deadline for paper proposals for University of Reading, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies (GCMS) 2-day conference, ‘Hybrids and Hybridity’ has now been extended to the 17th of February.

Aimed at providing a platform for post-grad and early career researchers examining the idea of hybrids and hybridity in the medieval and early modern periods, the conference offers a chance to present your work within an informal environment – be that a fully-formed paper or a more exploratory questioning of these concepts through themes including, but not limited to:

 

  • Imagery
  • Identity
  • Gender
  • Transition
  • Liminality

For any questions or to submit an abstract, please feel free to contact the organizers at gcms.reading@gmail.com.

CFP: Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts: 800 – 1600 (Abstracts due 1 February 2017)

oxford-bodley-ms-rawl-liturg-d-1_00923 June 2017, University of Cambridge

Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts: 800 – 1600 is an interdisciplinary conference that will explore various issues surrounding the complex subject of manuscripts whose parts have become dislodged and subsequently had diverging histories. Our goal is to foster dialogues—between different disciplines—on how to approach dismembered manuscripts from intellectual and practical perspectives.

We will compose panels thematically, grouping papers by geographical and temporal subject rather than by academic discipline. We encourage submissions from scholars, post-graduate students, and professionals in art history, palaeography/codicology, manuscript studies and conservation, digital humanities, history, museum studies, and beyond. Suggested topics include, but are by no means limited to:

  • The manuscript as an object made in layers over time
  • Digital reconstruction of manuscripts
  • New approaches to understanding reception
  • Methodologies for tracing lost/stolen fragments and leaves
  • Methodologies for reconstructing manuscripts
  • Economic, political, and legal consequences of reconstructing manuscripts
  • Reconstructed manuscripts in their original contexts
  • Modern methods of preservation for loose fragments/leaves
  • The art market as a means for fragment/leaf distribution
  • The role of collectors (public institutions and private individuals)

We intend to publish the proceedings from the conference in either a journal, or as a stand-alone anthology.

The Keynote will be given by Dr. David Rundle (University of Essex)
http://www.lostmss.org.uk/fragments-lost-manuscripts-search

Papers will be scheduled for 20 minutes. Please email your abstracts, of no more that 300 words to Dr. Kathryn Rudy and Stephanie Azzarello at reconstructing.mss.cambridge@gmail.com by 1 February 2017. Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and brief biography. We strongly encourage you to consider your paper as a performance, rehearse it well, and to avoid reading directly from the page, if possible. Successful applicants with be notified by 10 February 2017. Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts will take place at the University of Cambridge, Pembroke College, with a dinner to follow.

http://reconstructingmanuscripts2017.wordpress.com

Sponsored by Pembroke College, Cambridge and the University of St Andrews

Call for Contributions: Set Me as a Seal upon Thy Heart: Constructions of Female Sanctity in the Middle Ages (edited volume)

screen-shot-2017-01-20-at-9-19-20-amHoly women were represented on a variety of media, starting with manuscript illuminations, ending with frescoes, or textually-constructed and re-constructed in order to fit religious and/or political purposes, according to time and space(s). They imprinted their imagery on the social-cultural milieu of the Middle Ages as brides of Christ, virgin martyrs, or penitents, suggesting that medieval female sanctity is a multifaceted phenomenon. This volume intends to develop these concepts further in order to reconsider and redefine female holiness from a transdisciplinary perspective.

We welcome papers for the volume to be titled “Set Me as a Seal Upon Thy Heart.” Constructions of Female Sanctity in the Middle Ages.
Aiming to reflect recent research on the construction(s) of female holiness, we call for original manuscripts focusing on (but not limited to) the following topics:

  • Textual sources; text circulation and manipulation
  • Image-text relationship
  • Arts/visual culture and architecture
  • Thematic connections
  • Donors and audience
  • Cultural/religious constructions

Submission Guidelines:

Papers should be written following the template and guidelines found at http://www.trivent-publishing.eu and should have between minimum 7 and maximum 20 pages.

Dates and deadlines
Manuscript Submission March 20, 2017
Decision Notification May 8, 2017
Final Manuscript Submission June 12, 2017
Estimated Publication Date September 2017

* We kindly ask all prospective authors to send their intent of submitting a paper for this volume to publishing@trivent-publishing.eu by February 1st, 2017

The volume will be published open access. It will be listed in CEEOL, Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources, SSOAR, DOI, and will be sent for evaluation in the Book Citation Index of Thomson Reuters.

For information and queries on the scientific content of the volume, please contact the editor of the volume, Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky, znorovszky_a@auca.kg

For information on the publication, please contact publishing@trivent-publishing.eu or see Trivent Publishing’s website here: http://www.trivent-publishing.eu

Call for Contributions: English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography (edited volume)

english_-_resurrection_-_walters_27308The book aims at challenging the current limits within the field of research related to English alabasters, in order to establish a new model of study. Over the last century many studies on English alabasters have been published, including exhibition catalogues, list of documents and archival sources, catalogues raisonnés of the most important collections. All these studies have marked key points in the scholarly approach to English alabaster carvings, but they have also imposed a stubbornly curt historiographical perspective. Indeed, these publications have mainly been focused on specific collections -e.g. Frances Cheetham’s Medieval English alabaster carvings in the Castle Museum of Nottingham (Nottingham, 1973)-, and have thus provided only a partial view on that artistic phenomenon. They ended up isolating English alabasters from their historical and cultural context. In addition, as Susan Ward has pointed out in her review to Frances Cheetham’s Alabaster Images of Medieval England (Speculum, 2006), these publications’ main focus was often traditional: their bulks describe the standard subject matters found in the alabasters (e.g. the Passion of Christ, the Life of the Virgin and the saints) and explain the literary sources of that subject matter in a sometime too basic way. The authors tend to isolate the pieces from their wider historical framework, lacking to consider the character of piety in late-medieval England, and failing to consider the sculptures from a comprehensive historiographical point of view.

The book aims at setting the study of English alabasters on a new footing, which results from the influence of previous scholarship but, at the same time, reacts against it and is finally capable to establish a different approach.

Possible themes and subjects could address, but are not limited to one of the following topics

  • Alabaster altarpieces: function and design
  • Alabasters in pre/post Reformation England
  • Centres of productions, Trade routes
  • Workshop practices (Collaborations and Co-creations; Process and Method; Marks and Inscriptions; Archival records)
  • Reception of alabasters abroad; Possible adaption to local practices/taste
  • Patronage
  • Paraliturgical Dramas
  • Distinctions between rural/urban churches
  • Alabaster tombs

Papers will be collected in a volume to be published by the end of next year (2018), entitled English Alabaster Sculptures in Context: Art, History and Historiography. Submission: Please send an abstract of your proposed contribution (ca. 300 words) and a short CV to the editor: zuleika.murat@unipd.it.

Deadline: April 1, 2017.