Category Archives: Call for Papers

CFP: Regionalism in Medieval Art and Architecture (ICMA Student Committee Session), International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 10-13 May, 2018

800px-arte_islamica2c_ippogrifo2c_xi_sec_01CFP: Regionalism in Medieval Art and Architecture, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 10-13 May, 2018.
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee
Organized by Mark H. Summers (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Andrew Sears (University of California, Berkeley/University of Bern)

In 2001, Eva Hoffman introduced the concept of portability, suggesting a style that transcended traditional geographic, cultural, and religious boundaries. Since then, studies of traveling objects, trade networks, and pluralistic communities have created a veritable new field of the “Global Middle Ages,” which has helped us to better understand the interconnected medieval past as well as its role in shaping our sense of place today.

Our panel seeks to consider how local identity was shaped by such global networks. Potential questions include: Are artistic or architectural styles connected to specific places for specific reasons? Were medieval artists conscious about their own regional styles and the social, political, and religious impact they had? How was art positioned to both create communities and delineate boundaries? What about the rise of the “International Gothic” towards the end of the Middle Ages? Our concerns are also temporal, such as how the use of historicizing motifs and spolia helped medieval artists to communicate something about the here and now.

We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from graduate student ICMA members. To propose a paper, please send a title, abstract of 300 words, CV, and completed Congress Information form to Mark H. Summers (mhsummers@wisc.edu) and Andrew Sears (asears@berkeley.edu) by 10 September 2017.

The Student Committee of the International Center for Medieval Art involves and advocates for all members of the ICMA with student status and facilitates communication and mentorship between student and non-student members.

CFP: Medieval Monks, Nuns and Monastic Life, 15-20 July 2018, Bristol

screenshotCall for Papers: Medieval Monks, Nuns and Monastic Life, 21st Biennial Symposium of the International Medieval Sermon Studies Society (IMSSS), 15-20 July 2018, Bristol
Deadline: 30 September 2017
Organizer:
Professor Carolyn Muessig, Head of the University of Bristol’s Department of Religion and Theology and Co-Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS INCLUDE CLAUDIA RAPP (AUSTRIA) AND BRIAN PATRICK McGUIRE (DENMARK)
The 2018 IMSSS symposium will explore the breadth and depth of sermon literature and preaching activity relating to monks, nuns, and monastic life, and serve as a microcosm of the religious and cultural landscape of the Middle Ages.
The symposium will be based in the beautiful grounds of the University of Bristol’s Wills Hall, and will include a workshop at historic Downside Abbey, with its medieval manuscripts, incunables, and Centre for Monastic Heritage.
We will also visit Wells Cathedral, as well as the medieval sites of Bristol.
Celebrate 2018—the first-ever European Year of Cultural Heritage—by delivering a paper or presenting a poster dealing with an aspect of one of the bedrocks of European culture: monasticism
Topics for posters and papers may include:
-the form or content that could distinguish a monastic sermon from others
-monks, nuns, and monasticism in Byzantine or other forms of medieval Eastern and African Christianity
-the Rule of Benedict and preaching
-preaching in monastic churches and chapter houses
-monastic figures preaching in public forums (churches, crusades)
-monastic preaching in or regarding schools and universities
-preaching by and about nuns
de sanctis sermons on holy monks and nuns
-monasticism as treated in sermons
-sermons and the reformed monastic life (e.g., Camaldolese, Carthusian, Celestinian, Cistercian, Cluniac,et alii)
-preaching by and about hermits
-monastic rules in and about preaching
-monastic communities in conflict or in harmony
-monastic rejection/appropriation of mendicant sermons/preaching/identity
-monks as characters in sermons, exempla and religious literature
-gender in monastic preaching
-monks/nuns in ad status sermon literature
-monastic preaching in art
-monks, nuns, and monasticism in pre-modern sermons of religious traditions other than Christianity (e.g. , Islam, Buddhism, Taoism)
-the influence of Christian monks, nuns, & monastic sermons on preaching in other religions
-and more!
How to apply: send your abstracts for papers and posters (150 words) before 30 September 2017 (and any queries) to: imsss-2018@bristol.ac.uk

CFP: Byzantine Heritage in the History and Spiritual Culture of Ukraine, 19 – 22 October 2017, Monastery of St Theodore Studites, Rome, Italy

Culture of Ukraine, October 19 – 22, 2017, Monastery of St Theodore Studites,
Rome, Italy.
Deadline: 25th August 2017.
The International Conference Byzantine heritage in the history and spiritual culture of
Ukraine aims to become a platform for the sharing of knowledge. The conference will
involve the systematic discussion and promotion of the following themes:
  • Byzantine spiritual heritage in the history of Ukraine-Rus’ and Eastern churches of the Kievan tradition
  • the role and influence of the Byzantine Empire in the formation of Ukrainian national identity
  • spiritual culture
  • publishing and literature
  • art
  • theological and philosophical thought
  • religious traditions
and more.
Suggested topics for the conference:
1. Byzantium – Kievan Rus: historical, spiritual and cultural interconnection.
2. Byzantine hesychasm in the tradition of monasticism, and in the culture and
spiritual life of Ukraine-Rus’.
3. The Byzantine Fathers of the Church and the distribution of their books in
Ukraine.
4. Byzantine heritage in literature, art, theological and philosophical
thought, in liturgical science and in the church tradition of Ukraine.
5. “Studion” and its role in reviving the Byzantine Stoudite tradition of the Greek
Catholic Church (contribution by Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky and Patriarch
Josyph Slipyj).
6. Byzantine heritage in the traditions of modern Ukrainian monasticism.
7. The current state of Byzantines in Ukraine.
Working languages of the conference: Ukrainian, English, Italian.
The organizers will provide free accommodation and meals for participants during
the conference. There are plans to publish the results of the conference in the
scientific collection Sofia of Kiev: Byzantium. Russia. Ukraine.
The conference will allow for full-time and part-time participation.
How to apply:

The submission should indicate title of paper and author information (name,
surname, academic degree, title or position, address, home or mobile phone, email,
etc.).

The e-mail address of the Organizing Committee is tnu-pres@ukr.net

CFP: Medievalism and the Rediscovery of Medieval Art (International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018)

mermaidCall for papers: Medievalism and the Rediscovery of Medieval Art (International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018)

Deadline: September 15

Required: 300-word abstract and CV

From archaeology to the archive, medieval studies can be traced through various discoveries – from the physical uncovering of artifacts and collections that shift the canon, to periods of concentrated, sometimes unprecedented, attention received by an artist, medium, region or particular artifact. Parallel to these physical and theoretical discoveries, the reuse and display of medieval styles, motifs and objects has brought scholarly discovery into contemporary discourse, and the reception of medieval objects into areas beyond academia. Each generation has their own vision of the Middle Ages, from Horace Walpole to William Morris, from J.R.R. Tolkien to George R.R. Martin. Through the imitation and inspiration of the past, figures interested in medieval art have added their own preoccupations into how the period is understood, from the sixteenth century up to the present day. The same is true of scholars and collectors, who have promoted particular geographical or political agendas in their study and favouring of particular schools, regions, countries, and empires.

At a time when facts seem flexible and the consensus seems fragmented, a considerationof the agendas behind the presentation of medieval studies seems timely. We are interested in the phenomenon of discovery as event, narrative, academic and artistic moment, in how discoveries alter how we understand history and shift disciplines. Discoveries often teach us as much about the society doing the discovering as the objects being discovered, in both the field of medieval studies and the broader picture of medieval art reception. As such, it seems appropriate to consider academic discovery and popular discovery side by side. How might one affect the other? What parallels can be drawn between different kinds of discoveries?

This session seeks papers about how such discoveries can be and are engendered, and how contemporary concerns affect the presentation or process of scholarly and popular discovery. Possible topics might include the re-use of medieval or medievalising motifs in subsequent centuries and contemporary culture, medievalising restorations, particular medieval collectors or collections, the appropriation of medieval aesthetics, old objects in new settings, case studies of particular discoveries or rediscoveries, the changing display of medieval artifacts, and how political and geographical agendas affect the reception of medieval art.

Please send 300-word abstracts, together with a CV, to thalia.allington-wood@ucl.ac.uk and imogen.tedbury@courtauld.ac.uk by September 15.

CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)

CFP FOR AN EDITED COLLECTION: Architectural Representation in the European Middle Ages

ramsey censerCFP FOR AN EDITED COLLECTION: Architectural Representation in the European Middle Ages, edited by Hannah Bailey, Karl Kinsella, and Daniel Thomas

Deadline: 1 November 2017

The architectural remnants of the Middle Ages—from castles and cathedrals to village churches—provide many people’s first point of contact with the medieval period and its culture. Such concrete survivals provide a direct link to the material experience of medieval people. At the same time, exploring the ways in which architecture was conceptualized and depicted can contribute to our understanding of the ideological and imaginative worldview of the period.

This volume seeks to investigate all aspects of architectural representation in the medieval period, encompassing actual, symbolic, or imaginary architectural features, whether still standing today, observable in the archaeological record, or surviving only through depiction in literature or art. Topics of interest might include (but are not limited to) the social and symbolic value of architecture, architectural metaphor or imagery, architecture in visual representations, architecture in the depiction of other spaces, memory and architecture, and architectural style.

The volume is interdisciplinary in outlook and we welcome contributions from across the spectrum of academic disciplines, including literature, history, art, theology, and archaeology.

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words, with a brief biographical blurb, to the editors at: architecturalrepresentations@gmail.com by 1st November, 2017.

CFP: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

CfP ICMA Kalamazoo 2018 Moving People Shifting FrontiersCall for Papers: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean, International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13 2018
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Organizers: Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne) and Maria Alessia Rossi (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artifacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.