Category Archives: Call for Papers

CfP: Medieval Echo Chambers: Ideas in Space and Time, College Art Association Annual Conference Los Angeles, 21-24 February 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS: ICMA @ CAA

Medieval Echo Chambers: Ideas in Space and Time
College Art Association Annual Conference
Los Angeles, 21-24 February 2018

Session sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art

CFP Deadline: 14th August 2017

In recent decades, historians of medieval art and architecture have begun to think about the ways in which the interaction of objects, images, and performances were focused by particular medieval spaces. Whether directed towards a powerful cumulative spirituality, a slowly-accruing political self-fashioning, or more everyday performances of social coherence, it is clear that medieval space had the power to bind together sometimes quite disparate objects, forming their multiple parts into coherent messages for different types of viewers.

Thus far, however, such discussions have largely chosen to focus on individual moments of such consonance, thinking through the medieval Gesamtkunstwerk in only one particular iteration. This session proposes to expand this type of thinking beyond the snapshot by considering how medieval spaces could not only encourage resonance between objects in the moment but also echo these ideas over time. How did certain medieval spaces act as ideological echo chambers? How did certain spaces encourage particular recurring patterns of patronage, reception, or material reflection? How did people in the Middle Ages respond aesthetically to the history of spaces they inhabited, and how did they imagine these spaces’ future?

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers that focus on material from any part of the Middle Ages, broadly defined both chronologically and geographically.

Paper topics might address, but are by no means limited to:

  • longue durée narratives showcasing the continuous interaction of objects and architecture.
  • the resonance of particular quotidian spaces—marketplaces, bridges, squares—with objects and performances over time and across evolving audiences.
  • relationships emerging over time between certain types of space and certain types of artist or craftsman
  • documents and performances through which the evolving histories of particular spaces and objects were remembered, reiterated, repeated
  • the role of the immaterial—sound, light, smell, touch—in drawing together spaces and objects, and the issues associated with charting these relationships over time
  • medieval spaces that continue to foster relationships with objects of the classical world
  • medieval interactions between objects and space that project into the early modern period and beyond
  • ‘future spaces’, which point to times and places beyond themselves, whether an imminent reality or a more fantastical future

250-word proposals should be sent with a short academic CV to Jack Hartnell (j.hartnell@uea.ac.uk) and Jessica Barker (j.barker@uea.ac.uk) by 14th August 2017.

Accepted speakers may be eligible to apply for ICMA-Kress Travel Grants to support travel to and from Los Angeles. For more information, see: http://www.medievalart.org/kress-travel-grant

Organisers:
Dr Jack Hartnell, Lecturer in Art History (UEA, Norwich)
Dr Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Art History (UEA, Norwich)

CfP: (Im)mobility: Dialectics of Movement, Power & Resistance, LSE (28/11/2017)

The London Arts and Humanities Partnership (LAHP) is pleased to announce the cross-disciplinary student-led conference (Im)mobility: Dialectics of Movement, Power and Resistance, which will be hosted by the PhD Academy of the London School of Economics on 28 November 2017 (10am – 5pm).

The keynote speaker will be Dr Alexander Samson, Reader in Early Modern Studies at University College London.

The Call for Papers is open until 30 July 2017. View it online or download the PDF.

Venue: PhD Academy, London School of Economics, Lionel Robbins Building (4th floor), 10 Portugal Street, London WC2A 2HD, United Kingdom.

CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500-1800) (London, 18 Nov 17)

The contested concept of “reproduction” stands at a critical nexus of
the conceptualisation of Early Modern artistic thought. The early
modern period has been characterised by the development of novel and
efficient reproduction technologies, as well as the emergence of global
empires, growing interconnectedness through trade, warfare and
conquest, and the rise of new markets and cultures of collecting. This
ethos of innovation and cultural exchange was, however, contextualised
against myriad contemporary ideologies still rooted in the values and
legends of narratives of the past. Reproduction stood at the centre of
this dichotomy. Set against the context of changing cultural tastes and
the increasingly overlapping public and private spheres,
‘reproductions’ were involved within changing viewing practices,
artistic pedagogy, acts of homage and collecting.

The idea of reproduction connotes a number of tensions: between
authenticity and counterfeit; consumption and production; innovation
and imitation; the establishment of archetype and the creation of
replica; the conceptual value of the original and the worth of the
reproduction as a novel work of art; the display of contextualised
knowledge and the de-contextualisation of the prototype. At the same
time, production is shaped historically through practices and
discourses, and has figured as a key site for analysis in the work of,
for example, Walter Benjamin, Richard Wolin, Richard Etlin, Ian Knizek
and Yvonne Sheratt. Participants are invited to explore reproduction
‘beyond Benjamin’, investigating both the technical and philosophical
implications of reproducing a work of art and seeking, where possible,
a local anchoring for the physical and conceptual processes involved.

We welcome proposals for papers that investigate the theme of
reproduction from the early modern period (c.1500-1800), including
painting, print making, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture,
graphic arts and the intersections between them. Papers can explore
artistic exchanges across geopolitical, cultural and disciplinary
divides and contributions from other disciplines, such as the history
of science and conservation, are welcome. Topics for discussion may
include, but are not limited to:

The conceptualisation and processes of reproduction and reproduction
technologies before and at the advent of ‘the mechanical’;
Reproduction in artistic traditions beyond ‘the West’;
The slippage between innovation and imitation;
Part-reproduction and the changing, manipulation and developments of
certain motifs;
Problematizing the aura of ‘authenticity’ and the ‘value’ of the
original, copies and collecting;
Fakes and the de-contextualisation of a work through its reproduction;
Reproduction within non-object based study e.g. architecture;
Theoretical alternatives and the vocabulary used to describe the
process and results of reproduction in contemporary texts.
Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a 150 word
biography by 6th July 2017 to kyle.leyden@courtauld.ac.uk and
natasha.morris@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by Kyle Leyden, Natasha Morris and Angela Benza (The
Courtauld Institute of Art)

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500–1800) (London, 18 Nov 17). In:
H-ArtHist, Jun 6, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/15728>.

CfP: Painted on the wall:  the wall as a visual panel in the Middle Ages

The 11th Complutese Congress on Medieval Art aims to think about the visual function of medieval painted walls, taking into account that they were probably the best mass media in their context.

It will pay attention to the following topics: iconography, techniques, forms and expressive resources, socio-cultural context, preservation and the museum exhibition system.

There will be six sessions:

  • Session I: A multidisciplinary approach to medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Fernando Gutiérrez Baños (Univ. Valladolid)
  • Session II: Territory and medieval wall painting: centre and periphery. Invited Conferences of Prof. Jerrilynn Dodds (Sarah Lawrence College) and Dr Carmen Rallo (General Office of Museums of the Nation in Spain)
  • Session III: Function and meaning of the wall painting. Invited Conferences of Prof. Simone Piazza (Univ. Paul Valéry, Montpelier III) and Dr José Miguel Lorenzo Arribas (Scholl of Cultural Heritage in Spain)
  • Session IV: Techniques and colors in the preparations of the wall. Invited Conference of Prof. Rafael Ruiz Alonso (Royal Academy of History and Art of Saint Quirce)
  • Session V: Wall as an occasional support of other artistic techniques. Invited Conference of Prof. Roger Rosewell (Society of Antiquaries of London)
  • Session VI: Heritage: conservation, museums and virtualization of medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Jordi Camps (MNAC)

For more information: https://www.ucm.es/artemedieval/pintadoenlapared

CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Sociey of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

tumblr_oqexa0oz8t1syzcjgo1_500CFP: Following the Paper Trail? Complexities, Implications and Problems in Interpreting Primary Sources for Artistic Production, Renaissance Society of America, 22 to 24 March 2018, New Orleans

Organised by: Maggie Crosland, Saida Bondini and Costanza Beltrami, PhD Candidates, The Courtauld Institute of Art

As (art) historians we often use documents as evidence. Indeed, what could offer us more direct information about an object, artwork or building than the records of the material used to construct it, or the payments for its labour?

And yet, the mechanisms through which uniquely useful documents such as inventories, contracts and payment accounts are produced are not always transparent. In fact, these are formulaic documents written within tight conventions, for specific economic or legal ends. In this session, we aim to investigate how these records came to be, how they relate to the objects they purportedly explain and how they influence our perception, analysis and conclusions on the past and its relics.

In proposing this session, we are interested in uncovering what documents hide. For example, a contract must often be the final product of a long and multiple discussion. As such, this document reduces the interaction of several people — masters, family members, advisors, apprentices etc. to the legal agreement between just two, effacing all the other voices as well as the temporal dimension of reflection, creation, and changes of mind.

A goal of this session is to provide a platform through which scholars of different media and geographic location can discuss the complexities and implications of relying on and using primary documents. As such, we are interested in paper proposals that engage with such documents from a range of standpoints.

Suggested topics include:

– The temporal and plural vision of the past as hidden or revealed through documents

– Establishing patron-artist networks through primary sources

– Implications of agency and patronage

– The bureaucratic nature of artist contracts and payment accounts

– Missing conversations – how to look beyond the one-to-one relationship suggested by contracts and payment accounts

–  Reconstructing the lost/missing archive

– Early modern and modern historiography on the use of primary sources

– What information remains hidden in the archive, and what is published and promoted instead? What does this tell us about our changing perception and efforts to shape the past?

To be considered for our panel, please email costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk with:

-The title of your proposed paper (15-word maximum)
– Abstract (150-word maximum)
– 5 keywords
– A very brief curriculum vitae (300-word maximum), formatted to the RSA’s standards.
Please note that the deadline for applications is June 4, 2017.

CFP: Ars et Scientia (Cleveland, 27 Oct 17)

oresmeCase Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, October 27, 2017
Deadline: Jul 16, 2017

Ars et Scientia: Intersections of Science and the Visual Arts

October 27th, 2017

Despite the semantic divide that seems to separate art and science in modern culture, the boundaries between the two disciplines have always been fluid and permeable. From the earliest recorded botanical illustrations, painted on papyrus scrolls in Egypt in the 2nd century AD, to contemporary artist Josh Kline’s use of 3D printing in his work, art and science have long been used in tandem to make sense of the world and explore our place within it. The working notes of printers like Louis-Marin Bonnet as they experimented with the technique of chalk-manner engraving resemble nothing so much as a scientist recording data and observations for his experiments. Representations of the scientist at work in his laboratory also abound, from Pieter Bruegel’s Alchemist to Joseph Wright of Derby’s An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump, and serve as social commentaries on the role of the scientist in society. More recently, scientific technologies have proven to be invaluable tools for the modern art historian and museum curator, allowing us to better understand artists’ working methods and materials through the use of imaging technology and chemical analysis. This symposium seeks to foster a re-examination of the complex interactions between artistic and scientific disciplines that are more interdependent than they first appear.

We welcome innovative research papers from graduate students of all disciplines that challenge the divide between humanities and STEM fields. Papers may explore aspects of this topic across any time period, medium, or geographical region.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • depictions of scientists, doctors, astronomers, engineers, etc. at work
  • visual evidence for the transmission of scientific knowledge between cultures scientific diagrams: anatomical, botanical, astronomical, alchemical, etc.
  • technical art history
  • art that incorporates the use of novel technologies: for example early printing or photography, video art, 3D printing aestheticized technology, such as astrolabes and globes microphotography or photographs of patients/specimens
  • descriptions of artistic methodologies in terms of scientific
    experimentation

    For consideration, please submit a 350-word abstract and CV to clevelandsymposium@gmail.com by July 16, 2017. Selected participants will be notified by early August. Paper presentations will be 20 minutes in length, and participants will be invited to author a blog post about their research to be published at clevelandsymposium.tumblr.com.

    Please direct all questions to Aimee Caya and Erin Hein at clevelandsymposium@gmail.com.

CFP: The Image of the Multitude in Art and Philosophy (London, 10 Mar 18)

medieval peasant revolts.jpgThe Courtauld Institute of Art, London., March 10, 2018
Deadline: Sep 15, 2017

Imago Multitudinis. The Image of the Multitude in Art and Philosophy

An International Conference at the Courtauld Institute of Art London, on the 10th of March.

The Courtauld Institute of Art, The British Academy and the Collège International de Philosophie are pleased to announce a one-day interdisciplinary conference focusing on the philosophical representation and the artistic conceptualisation of the multitude and its associated concepts: the many, the masses, the crowd, the mob and the commonality.

A spectre is haunting our times: the spectre of the multitude. Uprisings, popular unrests, mass migrations, revolutions—the past ten years have been marked by unprecedented quests for freedom, embodied by unconventional political subjects pointing to the possibility of alternative outcomes of the crisis of both authoritarian regimes and representative democracies. Through the masterful drawing of Abraham Bosse, Hobbes attempted to tame the multitude forever. Constrained within the body politic of the monstrous Leviathan (1651), the multitude was transfigured into an obedient people and its potentia was (apparently) usurped. Yet, the multitude resisted—and still resists—this movement, challenging the predominant definitions of sovereignty. Following the collapse of modern master narratives, such as in the nascent seventeenth century, the multitude has returned.

Our investigation revolves around the political and aesthetic meanings of this omnipresent, if elusive, collective being. In particular, we would like to ask the following questions: how do philosophers represent the multitude and translate their concepts into cogent images? How do artists think about the multitude and its agency? This enquiry, which spans from the Middle Ages to the present, concentrates on the way in which images and iconographic motifs are elaborated in philosophy, as well as how political concepts are articulated in the visual arts. In order to understand the images pervading, and the concepts informing, recent collective political action (from Tahrir Square to the streets of Tunis, New York, Madrid, Ferguson via Rojava and Lampedusa), we intend to focus on their modern and contemporary genealogies. This is not only a historical enquiry. The history of the multitude can help us better understand the present. The aesthetic, agency and ambitions of this political subject do not only survive in books and museums, they also live on among us. The multitude resists, and if this is the conflict that characterises political modernity, then modernity has begun again.

Invited speakers: Horst Bredekamp (Humboldt-Universität); Claire Fontaine (artist); Sandro Mezzadra (Università di Bologna).

We invite submissions on the following topics including, but not limited to:
– Political iconography (from the Revolt of the Ciompi to the Arab Spring via the German Peasants’ War),
– Feminism and the multitude,
– The multitude in the USSR,
– The multitude and the English Civil Wars,
– Hobbes’ Behemoth,
– Spinoza’s, Machiavelli’s, Negri’s, Deleuze’s and Schmitt’s depictions of the multitude,
– The “popular hydra” in nineteenth-century Paris,
– Baroque and the multitude,
– The multitude and migrations in contemporary art.

Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 500 words together with a short CV to jacopo.galimberti@manchester.ac.uk by the 15th of September. Successful candidates will be notified in early October. Papers should not exceed 25 minutes in length.