Tag Archives: Travel

CFP: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8Call for Papers: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)
Deadline: November 30, 2016

Issue 2018: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture,
1400-1700’

In his letter to Philippe de Lannoy, from 1578 (De ratione cum fructu
perigrinandi et preaesertim in Italia), Justus Lipsius summarized the
aims of traveling as: ‘utilitas’ and ‘voluptas’. Traveling, according
to Lipsius, would lead to spiritual enrichment, as it would bring one
into contact with different people, different lifestyles, and different
customs and morals. At the same time, it would increase knowledge about
other countries and places, and about history. More or less at the same
time appeared a growing number of guides and treatises on traveling
(artes apodemicae), meant to prepare travelers for their trip, giving
advice on how to deal with the various mores in different countries and
supplying ‘cultural’ information on topography, history, important
monuments and other attractions.

In this volume, we want to study the production of knowledge shaped by
the traveling guides and artes apodemicae, especially in their
interaction with the actual practices of traveling and acquiring
knowledge. What was the formative importance of (printed) guides and
travel literature for the practice of traveling? How decisive was the
information they supplied in directing the travelers’ interest and
attention, and in shaping their views and knowledge? Or, the other way
round, was the information offered in guides and art literature
specified and/or expanded, or did it acquire a different scope as a
result of increasing knowledge or ‘new’ fields of interest developed by
travelers? And in which ways did the literature on traveling affect
other areas of knowledge production, either established academic
disciplines or new fields of knowledge?

Topics to be addressed may include:
– The use of travel literature and (national or local) guides. As books
were often too heavy or expensive to carry around during a visit ‘on
the spot’, to what extent and in which way were they consulted
beforehand or afterwards? How did this use beforehand or afterwards
affect the visitors’ experience?
Travel literature and (national or local) guides in relation to travel
accounts. As travel reports were often written after the voyage had
been made, much of the information in them was based on consultation of
guides afterwards. What does that mean for the reliability of travel
accounts?
– What was the impact of the  target audience of (national or local)
guides? What differences can be discerned between guides written in
Latin (obviously for a learned public) and vernacular ones (or
vernacular versions)? To what extent was the kind of information
adapted (expanded, or cut down) to target a wider audience?
– What was the nature and scope of travel reports? Were they in the
first place  a listing of things done and visited or do they reflect
the ‘spiritual enrichment’ that travel theorists such as Lipsius were
writing about? What kind of travel accounts were published and what
kind remained in manuscript, and what does that say about their aim,
function and intended audience?
– How much of the information offered in (national or local) guides was
actually ‘new’? To a large extent, the various guides of a specific
city or region repeated each other. Were they regularly updated with
the inclusion of new monuments (recently finished buildings, modern
works of art, etc.) or with newly acquired information (dates and names
etc.)?
– To what extent have their listings of monuments shaped our present
canon of important art works and ‘not to be missed’ attractions? Are
monuments that were not included (e.g. because they were not (easily)
accessible) still being disregarded, even though they were/are of high
cultural or historical importance?
– The importance of other sources of information besides guides and
travel literature, such as (historical) writings by antique, medieval
and (near) contemporary authors, collections of inscriptions, prints
and book illustrations.

How to submit: Please submit a one-page abstract (ca. 300 words) and a short
curriculum vitae (max. two pages) to both editors, before December 1,
2016:

– Karl Enenkel, Medieval and Early Modern Latin Philology, Westfälische
Wilhelms-Universität, Münster: kenen_01@uni-muenster.de
and
– Jan L. de Jong, History of Early Modern Art, Rijksuniversiteit
Groningen: j.l.de.jong@rug.nl

Applicants will be notified before January 1, 2017. Depending funding,
a conference with all authors is planned to take place in Münster, in
November 2017. Final chapters are due by February 1, 2018.

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CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017

20140125-010711CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017
Organiser: Isabella Augart, University of Hamburg, Department of Art History
Deadline: 10th September 2016.

The medieval pilgrimage routes were spaces of cultural and material exchange upon which diverse travellers set off on a common path. The research focus on the link between geography and religion over the last few years has considerably broadened our understanding of medieval art and architecture. The proposed session seeks to provide perspectives on images, church spaces, sacred topographies and material culture of pilgrimage with a regional concentration on the Holy Roman Empire, focusing in particular on the following areas of interest:

  • accounts of pilgrimage journeys in illuminated manuscripts and prints
  • the relation of pilgrimage churches and routes to the surrounding landscape
  • social dimensions of accessibility and mediation in topographies of pilgrimage
  • visual and tactile practices of veneration related to churches and artworks

How to submit: Please send your abstract (max.150-words) for a twenty-minute paper and a short biography to the session organiser (isabella.augart@uni-hamburg.de) before 10th September 2016.

Fellowship: Andrew W. Mellon Mediterranean Regional Research Fellowship Programme

antonio_millo_bacino_del_mediterraneoFellowship: Andrew W. Mellon Mediterranean Regional Research Fellowship Program
Applications open: September 2016 – Application deadline: January 2017

The Council of American Overseas Research Centers is pleased to announce a new focused regional fellowship program enabling pre- and early post-doctoral scholars to carry out research in the humanities and related social sciences in countries bordering the Mediterranean and served by American overseas research centers. Funding for this program is generously provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Scholars must be:

  • a US citizen or Permanent Resident;
  • be a doctoral candidate or a scholar who obtained his/her Ph.D. within the last ten years (September 2005 or later);
  • propose a three to nine month humanities or related social science research project;
  • and propose travel to one or more Mediterranean region country, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center.

Fellowship awards will not exceed $33,500.

Information: http://www.caorc.org/#!fellowships/c17cq

CFP: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517

St. Anne’s College, Oxford, 28-30 June 2017

An international conference organised by the Faculty of English, University of Oxford, this event builds on the success of the 2009 Oxford conference, After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England, which resulted in a book of essays (ed. by Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh) that vigorously interrogated the nature of religious and intellectual culture in England in the long fifteenth century. After Chichele adopts a similar investigative and interdisciplinary approach. The period has been chosen precisely because the inner workings of English intellectual and religious life during these years have proved challengingly resistant to the formation of grand critical narratives. What are the chief currents driving the intellectual and cultural life of the church in England during this period? What happened to intellectual questioning during the period, and where did the Church’s cultural life express itself most vividly? What significant parochial, regional, national and international influences were brought to bear on English literate practices? In order to address these questions, the conference will adopt an interdisciplinary focus, inviting contributions from historians, literary scholars, and scholars working on the theology, ecclesiastical history, music and art of the period, and it is expected that a wide range of literary and cultural artefacts will be considered, from single-authored works to manuscript compilations, from translations to original works, and from liturgy to art and architecture, with no constraints as to the conference’s likely outcomes and conclusions. It is intended that the conference should generate a volume of essays similar to After Arundel in scope, ambition and quality.

Plenary speakers: David Carlson, Mary Erler, Sheila Lindenbaum, Julian Luxford, David Rundle, Cathy Shrank.

Possible topics for discussion:
Religious writing and the English Church; the emergence of humanism and the fate of scholasticism; literature and the law; cultural and ecclesiastical patronage; developments in art and architecture; the liturgical life of the Church; the impact of the international book trade and of print; palaeography and codicology; the Church’s role in education, colleges and chantries; the impact of travel and pilgrimage.

Please send 500 word abstracts (for proposed 20-minute papers) by Friday, 12th August 2016 to Vincent Gillespie, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA (vincent.gillespie@ell.ox.ac.uk).

Conference: Pilgrimage: Location and Imagination in Medieval England

Conference-Image.png

The Taymouth Hours, courtesy of The British Library

Conference: Pilgrimage: Location and Imagination in Medieval England, Lee Hall, Wolfson College, Cambridge CB3 9BB, April 16, 2016.

 

The Cambridgeshire Historic Churches Trust in association with Cambridge University announce the programme of their 2016 conference:

09.30am     Registration
10.00am     Welcome and Introduction
10.05am     Indulgences, Images and Pilgrimage, with Dr Jessica Berenbeim (Magdalen College, Oxford)

11.00am     Coffee

11.25am     Over The Edge: Medieval travel and the experience of elsewhere, with Miguel Ayres de Campos (Courtauld Institute of Art)

12.20pm     Sandwich Lunch (for those who have pre-booked it)

1.10pm        The Work of the Cambridgeshire Historic Churches Trust, with The Rt Revd David Thomson, Trust Chairman
1.35pm         The Digital Pilgrim Project at the British Museum, with Amy Jeffs (Corpus Christi College, Cambridge), and Robert Kaleta (University College, London)

2.20pm        Short Break

2.30pm        Scholarly Peregrinations among the Parish Churches of Norfolk, with Bryan Ayres, Clare Haynes, Prof. Sandy Heslop, and Dr Helen Lunnon (University of East Anglia)

3.25pm        Tea

3.50pm        Crossing the Threshold: the layperson’s experience in the Parish Church Chancel with Dr James Cameron (Alumnus of the Courtauld Institute of Art)

4.45pm        Closing Remarks

Directions to the Conference location can be found here.

A booking form can be found here.

Ticket prices are: £15 (CHCT members & guests);  £20 (non-members) £10 (undergraduates). Sandwich lunches can be booked for £9.50.

 

 

Great news about ICMA travel grants and awards

ICMA logoNEW FOR 2015!
ICMA GRADUATE STUDENT TRAVEL GRANTS

The ICMA has initiated a new form of grant for graduate students in the early stages of their dissertation research. Three grants will be awarded this year, at $3,000 each, to enable a student to travel to Europe (including the Eastern Mediterranean) to visit the monuments or museum objects or manuscripts on which the dissertation will be based. The grant is designed to cover one month of travel. The ICMA will contact institutions and/or individuals in the area to be visited; these will help the student gain access to the relevant material and aid in other practical matters.

The grant is designed primarily for the student who has finished the preliminary exams, and is in the process of formulating a dissertation topic. Students who have already submitted a proposal, but are still very early on in the process of their research, may also apply.

All applicants must be ICMA members. (Join at http://medievalart.org/join)

Applicants must submit:

1. Outline of the thesis proposal in 800 words or less.

2. Detailed outline of exactly what the student would like to see on his/her travels, and how this relates to the proposed thesis topic.

3. Proposed budget (airfare, lodging, other travel, per diem).

4. Letter from the thesis advisor, clarifying where the student stands in his/her graduate career, and explaining the relevance of the trip to the thesis.

Upon return, the student will be required to submit a letter and financial report to the ICMA and a narrative to the student section of the Newsletter.

Applications are due by 15 April 2015. The ICMA will announce the winners of the three grants by 15 May 2015.

Please submit materials as PDF attachments to Ryan Frisinger at icma@medievalart.org.

2015 GRADUATE STUDENT ESSAY AWARD

The International Center of Medieval Art wishes to announce its annual Graduate Student Essay Award for the best essay by a student member of the ICMA. The theme or subject of the essay may be any aspect of medieval art, and can be drawn from current research. The work must be original and should not have been published elsewhere. The winner will receive a prize of $400.

Thanks to the generosity of one of our members, we are now be able to offer a second prize as well, of $200. The donor of this prize has suggested that “special consideration be given to those papers that incorporate some discussion of the interconnections among medieval science, technology, and art.” Although the prize will by no means be restricted to papers that address this theme, papers that do so will be given special attention by the selection committee.

The deadline for submission is 31 March 2015. The winners will be announced at the ICMA meeting in Kalamazoo in May.

Applicants must submit:
1. An article-length paper (maximum 30 pages, not including footnotes) following the editorial guidelines of our journal Gesta.
2. Each submission must also include a 250-word abstract written in English regardless of the language of the rest of the paper.
3. Curriculum vitae and must be current members of the ICMA for their essays to be considered.

All submissions are to be sent as PDF attachments to Ryan Frisinger, at icma@medievalart.org. The winning essay will be chosen by members of the ICMA Grants and Awards Committee, which is chaired by our Vice-President.