Tag Archives: Travel

Scholarship: BAA travel scholarship to April 2020 Romanesque Conference, Hildesheim

The British Archaeological Association has a limited number of scholarships for their 2020 Romanesque Conference in Hildesheim. These scholarships are aimed towards students studying Early Medieval Art History/Archaeology or Architecture, especially those studying Romanesque.

Send a short CV & referee details to jsmcneill@btinternet.com or rplant62@hotmail.com by 15th November 2019.

 

More information about the conference:

The Year 1000 in Romanesque Art and Architecture

Date(s): 14 – 16 Apr 2020

Venue: Hildesheim, Germany

The British Archaeological Association will hold the sixth in its biennial International Romanesque conference series in conjunction with the Dommuseum in Hildesheim on 14-16 April, 2020. The theme is Romanesque and the Year 1000, and the aim is to examine transformations in the art and architecture of the Latin Church around
the turn of the millennium. The Conference will take place at the Cathedral Museum in Hildesheim, with the opportunity to stay on for two days of visits to Romanesque monuments on 17-18 April. The 30 years to either side of the year 1000 witnessed remarkable developments in iconography and stylistic expression. It saw portable devotional statues come into being, the revival of bronze-casting, the reemergence of architectural relief sculpture, and the application of novel, or at least re-understood, architectural forms. In addition to the above, individual papers are concerned with the impact of objects from the Carolingian past and Byzantine present, royal patronage, monastic reform, the organization of scriptoria, ‘authorship’, changes in representational strategies, and regional affiliation.

 

Speakers include Marcello Angheben, Claude Andrault-Schmitt, Michael Brandt, Jordi Camps, Hugh Doherty, Eric Fernie, Shirin Fozi, Barbara Franzé, Richard Gem, Agata Gomolka, Lindy Grant, Cecily Hennessy, Wilfried Keil, Sophie Kelly, Bruno Klein, Florian Meunier, Jesús Rodríguez Viejo, Tobias Schoo, Markus Späth, Béla Zsolt Szakács, Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo, Eliane Vergnolle, Michele Vescovi, Rose Walker, and Tomasz Weclawowicz

Found out more here: https://thebaa.org/event/hildesheim/

CFP: Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28–29 May 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline – Friday 10 January 2020

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Travelling Objects, Travelling People aims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France and the Low Countries, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference will reconsider the dynamics of artistic influence in late medieval Iberia, and place European exchanges in a global context, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, it seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and issues of migration and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.

The theme of ‘travellers’—artists who reached or departed the region, at times more than once in their lives, but also objects and concepts imported and exported—will expand and inflect traditional narratives of late medieval and Renaissance art, underscoring the complexity of global interactions and exchanges which connected the Iberian peninsula to Europe and beyond. Bringing together international scholars working on Iberia and a range of related geographies, the conference seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to expand the field of analysis beyond Europe to encompass relationships with newly acquired dominions, from Madeira to Santo Domingo.

Topics for papers may include, but are not limited to:

  • Iberian artists employed abroad, from the master mason Guillelm Sagrera in Naples, to the sculptor Juan de la Huerta at the Chartreuse de Champmol
  • The close imitation of northern artists in such works as the Portuguese copies of Quentin Metsys’s The Angel Appearing to Saints Clara, Colette and Agnes (early 16th century, Museu de Setúbal / Convento de Jesus, Portugal)
  • ‘Iberian’ objects produced elsewhere, for example Christian ivory carvings made in Goa or Kongo, Afro-Portuguese spoons, and Mexican ‘feather-work’ adopting the vocabulary of northern European late Gothic painting
  • Works made for a non-Iberian audience but purchased and displayed by local patrons.

By encouraging conversations across such seemingly disparate topics and geographies, the conference aims to position the Iberian artistic landscape within the networks of artistic exchange that spanned the medieval and Renaissance worlds, challenging the significance of 1492 as a moment of rupture between the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods.

Proposals are welcome from postgraduate, early-career and established researchers working in all relevant disciplines. Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words together with a short CV and 100-word biography to Costanza.Beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and Sylvia.Alvares-Correa@history.ox.ac.uk by Friday 10 January 2020.

Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Successful candidates will be notified by 17 February. In the first instance, applicants are encouraged to apply to their home institution for travel and accommodation funding. The organisers hope to provide financial support for travel and accommodation to speakers who require it. This conference is made possible by the kind generosity of Sam Fogg.

Please click here for more information.

Conference: Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean, UNED, Madrid, October 26, 2018

Image result for portolano mediterraneoINTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean: sociability networks and artistic creation in the Late Medieval and Early Modern periods
UNED, Madrid 26 de octubre de 2018.

9.30. Presentación
SESIÓN 1: Alteridades móviles: La visión del otro en la literatura y el arte
Modera: Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza (UCM)
10:00-10:20: Representando al otro: tejidos y vestidos en los espacios de sociabilidad en el siglo XV castellano. Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
10:20-10:40: The Fifth Column: rethinking the Morisco’s visual representation. Borja Franco Llopis (UNED).
10:40-11:00: La visión del cristiano como “otro”. Alteridad en el Mediterráneo Otomano. Miguel Ángel de Bunes Ibarra (CSIC).
11:00-11:30: DEBATE
11:30-12:00: PAUSA-CAFÉ

Sesión 2: Redes de saber, redes de poder: Objetos y conocimientos en circulación
Modera: Consuelo Gómez López (UNED)
12:00-12:20: Movilidad, circulación, interacción. La formación de un grupo de presión belicista en la monarquía policéntrica de los Habsburgo (Génova, Madrid, País Vasco – siglo XVI) Bastien Carpentier (Université Littoral Côte d’Opale)
12:20-12:40: No solo inventarios. Bibliotecas en movimiento en el Mediterráneo. Margarita Vázquez Manassero (UNED)
12:40-13:00: Un mar en papeles para los ojos de Felipe II: la ciencia y el dibujo del ingeniero. Alicia Cámara Muñoz (UNED)
13:00-13:30: DEBATE
13:30-15:30: COMIDA

Sesión 3: El Mediterráneo: espacio de conflicto, espacio de intercambio.
Modera: Fernando Rodríguez Mediano (CSIC-CORPI)
15.30-15:50: Los espías del rey. La inteligencia hispano-imperial contra el turco (siglo XVI) Gennaro Varriale (Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”)
15:50-16:10 Caravaggio in Malta and his connection to the Ottoman Art. Filiz Çakir Phillip (Aga Khan Museum Toronto).
16:10-16:30: Between objects and subjects: slaves and religious artifacts in the 17th Mediterranean. Daniel Hershenzon (University of Connecticut)
16:30-17:00 DEBATE
17:00-17:30: PAUSA CAFÉ

Sesión 4: Un Mediterráneo global. Dinámicas transoceánicas  del siglo XVI
Modera: Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
17:30-17:50 Lepanto in the Americas: Global Storytelling and Mediterranean History. Stefan Hanß (University of Manchester)
17:50-18:10: American objects at the beginning of the sixteenth century Antonio Urquízar Herrera (UNED).
18:10-18:30: DEBATE

18.30 CONCLUSIONES Y CLAUSURA

Evento patrocinado por la Facultad de Geografía e Historia y el Departamento de Historia del Arte de la UNED y organizado dentro del proyecto: HAR2016-80354-P. IMPI. Antes del orientalismo: Las “imágenes” del musulmán en la Península Ibérica (siglos XV-XVII) y sus conexiones mediterráneas (Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Universidades- Fondos FEDER).
Actividad del Grupo de Investigación: Arte y Pensamiento en la Edad Moderna y Contemporánea

Dirección científica: Elena Paulino Montero
Coordinación científica: Borja Franco Llopis

Click here for more information

CFP: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019: GENDER AND ALIENS, Durham University, 7th–10th January 2019

In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or ‘strangers’), and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens.

This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the medieval world. Social, political and religious attitudes to aliens and the alienated were not constant over the centuries from c. 400 to c. 1500, and nor were they uniform across the whole world. Some foreigners, as aliens, might end up integrated into the societies they entered; others might find themselves marginalised, lonely or alone; or oppressed, as outlaws, outcasts, or slaves. Gender might exacerbate or mitigate this, depending on time, place and context. Authors or artists depicting parts of the world far from and alien to their own often filled them with people or beings not like them, demonstrating the imaginative power of alterity, while the reactions of those who encountered people from distant places and observed or participated in their customs could include recognition of similarity as well as difference. Foreigners were also not the only people who might find themselves alienated from, or within, certain societies or cultures: the medieval world included many marginalised groups. The issues of aliens and alienation may be differently construed in the modern world, but they are certainly not new. The relationship of gender to these topics is complex, variable and significant.

The conference aims to enable discussion of these issues as they relate to the whole medieval world from c. 400 to c. 1500. The organisers welcome proposals for papers on any topic related to gender and aliens or alienation, broadly construed, and encourage submissions relating to the world beyond Europe. Papers might consider issues such as:

  • refugees, immigrants, emigrants
  • inclusion and exclusion
  • alterity and difference
  • outlaws, the law, legality
  • marginalised or disenfranchised groups
  • non-normative bodies, illness, disability
  • acculturation
  • imagined geographies
  • borders and frontiers
  • ethnicity and identity
  • slavery and slaves

In addition to sessions of papers, the conference will also include a poster session. Proposals for a 20-minute paper or for a poster can be submitted at https://tinyurl.com/gms2019submit by September 30th 2018. The conference organisers are also happy to consider proposals for other kinds of presentation: please contact the organisers at gmsconference2019@gmail.com to discuss these. Some travel bursaries will be available for students and unwaged delegates to attend this conference: please see http://medievalgender.co.uk/ for details.


Images: The Emperor and the Court Lady, from ‘Nüshi zhen’ (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), text composed by Zhang Hua (c.AD 232-300); 6th-8th century. (C) The Trustees of the British Museum

God casts out Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden, in the ‘Old English Hexateuch,’ London, British Library, Cotton Claudius B.iv, f. 6v, 11th century. (C) British Library

 

 

CFP: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8Call for Papers: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture, 1400-1700,’ Intersections: Yearbook for Early Modern Studies (Brill)
Deadline: November 30, 2016

Issue 2018: ‘Artes Apodemicae and Early Modern Traveling Culture,
1400-1700’

In his letter to Philippe de Lannoy, from 1578 (De ratione cum fructu
perigrinandi et preaesertim in Italia), Justus Lipsius summarized the
aims of traveling as: ‘utilitas’ and ‘voluptas’. Traveling, according
to Lipsius, would lead to spiritual enrichment, as it would bring one
into contact with different people, different lifestyles, and different
customs and morals. At the same time, it would increase knowledge about
other countries and places, and about history. More or less at the same
time appeared a growing number of guides and treatises on traveling
(artes apodemicae), meant to prepare travelers for their trip, giving
advice on how to deal with the various mores in different countries and
supplying ‘cultural’ information on topography, history, important
monuments and other attractions.

In this volume, we want to study the production of knowledge shaped by
the traveling guides and artes apodemicae, especially in their
interaction with the actual practices of traveling and acquiring
knowledge. What was the formative importance of (printed) guides and
travel literature for the practice of traveling? How decisive was the
information they supplied in directing the travelers’ interest and
attention, and in shaping their views and knowledge? Or, the other way
round, was the information offered in guides and art literature
specified and/or expanded, or did it acquire a different scope as a
result of increasing knowledge or ‘new’ fields of interest developed by
travelers? And in which ways did the literature on traveling affect
other areas of knowledge production, either established academic
disciplines or new fields of knowledge?

Topics to be addressed may include:
– The use of travel literature and (national or local) guides. As books
were often too heavy or expensive to carry around during a visit ‘on
the spot’, to what extent and in which way were they consulted
beforehand or afterwards? How did this use beforehand or afterwards
affect the visitors’ experience?
Travel literature and (national or local) guides in relation to travel
accounts. As travel reports were often written after the voyage had
been made, much of the information in them was based on consultation of
guides afterwards. What does that mean for the reliability of travel
accounts?
– What was the impact of the  target audience of (national or local)
guides? What differences can be discerned between guides written in
Latin (obviously for a learned public) and vernacular ones (or
vernacular versions)? To what extent was the kind of information
adapted (expanded, or cut down) to target a wider audience?
– What was the nature and scope of travel reports? Were they in the
first place  a listing of things done and visited or do they reflect
the ‘spiritual enrichment’ that travel theorists such as Lipsius were
writing about? What kind of travel accounts were published and what
kind remained in manuscript, and what does that say about their aim,
function and intended audience?
– How much of the information offered in (national or local) guides was
actually ‘new’? To a large extent, the various guides of a specific
city or region repeated each other. Were they regularly updated with
the inclusion of new monuments (recently finished buildings, modern
works of art, etc.) or with newly acquired information (dates and names
etc.)?
– To what extent have their listings of monuments shaped our present
canon of important art works and ‘not to be missed’ attractions? Are
monuments that were not included (e.g. because they were not (easily)
accessible) still being disregarded, even though they were/are of high
cultural or historical importance?
– The importance of other sources of information besides guides and
travel literature, such as (historical) writings by antique, medieval
and (near) contemporary authors, collections of inscriptions, prints
and book illustrations.

How to submit: Please submit a one-page abstract (ca. 300 words) and a short
curriculum vitae (max. two pages) to both editors, before December 1,
2016:

– Karl Enenkel, Medieval and Early Modern Latin Philology, Westfälische
Wilhelms-Universität, Münster: kenen_01@uni-muenster.de
and
– Jan L. de Jong, History of Early Modern Art, Rijksuniversiteit
Groningen: j.l.de.jong@rug.nl

Applicants will be notified before January 1, 2017. Depending funding,
a conference with all authors is planned to take place in Münster, in
November 2017. Final chapters are due by February 1, 2018.

CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017

20140125-010711CFP: Topographies of devotion. Visual cultures of pilgrimage in the 14th and 15th century @International Medieval Congress 2017, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017
Organiser: Isabella Augart, University of Hamburg, Department of Art History
Deadline: 10th September 2016.

The medieval pilgrimage routes were spaces of cultural and material exchange upon which diverse travellers set off on a common path. The research focus on the link between geography and religion over the last few years has considerably broadened our understanding of medieval art and architecture. The proposed session seeks to provide perspectives on images, church spaces, sacred topographies and material culture of pilgrimage with a regional concentration on the Holy Roman Empire, focusing in particular on the following areas of interest:

  • accounts of pilgrimage journeys in illuminated manuscripts and prints
  • the relation of pilgrimage churches and routes to the surrounding landscape
  • social dimensions of accessibility and mediation in topographies of pilgrimage
  • visual and tactile practices of veneration related to churches and artworks

How to submit: Please send your abstract (max.150-words) for a twenty-minute paper and a short biography to the session organiser (isabella.augart@uni-hamburg.de) before 10th September 2016.