Tag Archives: historiography

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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Deadline Extended: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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CFP: L’architecture gothique. Entre réception et invention. Impact, continuité et réinterprétation (XIIe – XXe siècle), Centre André Chastel, Paris, 10 March 2018

e4172ce752979324efadeeb13ae35d66-viollet-le-duc-game-propsCall for Papers: L’architecture gothique. Entre réception et invention. Impact, continuité et réinterprétation (XIIe – XXe siècle), Centre André Chastel, Paris, 10 March 2018
Deadline: 15 November 2017
L’une des définitions les plus correctes du terme « gothique » est celle qui interprète ce phénomène architectural non comme l’expression d’une période historique mais comme un système structurel, défini en Ile-de-France à partir du milieu du XIIe siècle. Les connaissances techniques déjà expérimentées à l’époque romane sont alors intégrées dans une relation consciente entre structures portantes et structures portées, en obtenant de nouveaux effets esthétiques et symboliques.

Entre la fin du XIIe et le XIIIe siècle, l’architecture gothique se développe en Europe, particulièrement en Angleterre, Allemagne, Espagne, Italie, Hongrie et Bohème et entre en contact avec les traditions constructives locales, notamment grâce à l’activité des ordres monastiques. La synthèse entre la réception de modèles existants et l’invention de nouvelles expressions artistiques donne naissance à des œuvres neuves créées dans des contextes historiques, géographiques et socio-culturels différents par rapport au contexte français.

En Italie, par exemple, la leçon du gothique français, transmise principalement par les cisterciens, est ensuite assimilée par les ordres mendiants et, en Italie méridionale, par Frédéric II et finalement par les Angevins. Cependant, le gothique italien ne développe pas l’audace structurelle qui fut, en France, à l’origine d’un formidable élan vertical des parois et de l’effet de lux continua. Cette différence est à la fois due à la persistance de techniques constructives traditionnelles dans la filiation de l’architecture paléochrétienne et à l’impossibilité d’appliquer la technique de l’arc-boutant dans une zone fortement sismique.

Au même titre, en France, entre le début du XVe et le milieu du XVIe siècle, l’art gothique flamboyant se mêle à la tradition de la Renaissance importée d’Italie : si l’ossature des églises reste « gothique » même lorsque les formes ornementales assimilent des caractères à l’antique, l’originale rationalité structurelle est en grande partie perdue. La persistance des formes flamboyantes dans l’architecture de la Renaissance française est un phénomène intéressant qui révèle l’importance et l’influence de la tradition gothique.

Plus tardivement et à titre d’exemple, au XIXe siècle le phénomène des revivals historicistes atteste la reprise du langage gothique en Europe. Une telle tendance s’imposa d’abord en Grande-Bretagne puis se diffusa dans d’autres pays européens, parallèlement à l’intense activité de restauration des monuments médiévaux : en France c’est surtout Eugène Viollet-le-Duc qui en souligna la rationalité constructive. Le néogothique, devenu désormais partie intégrante de l’éclectisme historiciste, constitue une source fondamentale pour l’art nouveau jusqu’au début du XXe siècle.

La journée sera par conséquent consacrée à une réflexion sur la réception de l’architecture gothique comme langage flexible, à même de créer de nouvelles formes artistiques : l’objectif est de conduire l’historien de l’art et de l’architecture à enquêter sur la portée et l’influence de ce phénomène dans des contextes différents de celui d’origine. La journée vise ainsi à élargir l’analyse aux questions historiques, politiques, culturelles et urbaines, en fonction des objectifs des commanditaires et en établissant des liens entre aspects structurels, fonctionnels et formels. La journée doctorale sera l’occasion de partager les réflexions méthodologiques, les problématiques et les résultats des recherches en histoire de l’architecture de doctorants et jeunes docteurs de formations et de pays divers.

La série de thématiques suivante est destinée à suggérer des domaines et directions de recherche et n’a que valeur indicative :
– Techniques et matériaux de l’Architecture gothique : innovations structurelles, continuité et rupture avec le passé
– Cathédrale gothique et différentes formes locales en France
– Gothique français et sa diffusion en Europe
– Gothique flamboyant et Renaissance : dialectique entre survivances structurelles et décor « à l’antique »
– Réception du Gothique après le Gothique : survivance et renouveau néogothique
– L’architecture gothique, sa restauration ou sa réutilisation contemporaine
– L’architecture gothique intégrée dans les autres formes de l’art visuels (peinture, gravure, sculpture), sémantique visuelle et revival.

La journée donnera la priorité aux interventions des doctorants et jeunes docteurs. Elle se déroulera le 10 mars 2018 au Centre André Chastel (INHA, 2, rue Vivienne, 75002 Paris).

How to apply:  Les propositions de communication (300 mots maximum), en français ou en anglais, accompagnées d’un bref curriculum vitae (2 pages maximum), sont à envoyer, le 15/11/2017 au plus tard, à Camilla Ceccotti et Emanuele Gallotta aux adresses suivantes :
camilla.ceccotti@uniroma1.it
emanuele.gallotta@uniroma1.it

CFP: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 30 October 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 30 October 2017.

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CFP: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM journal

Call for Contributions: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM. Exchanges and Interactions in the Arts of Medieval Europe, Byzantium, and the Mediterranean, special issue edited by Elisabetta Scirocco (Bibliotheca Hertziana – MPI) and Gerhard Wolf (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – MPI), published March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 20 September 2017
Deadline for article submission: 30 November 2017

tavola_strozzi_-_napoli
This thematic issue of the journal Convivium is dedicated to the Italian South from the 5th to the 15th century. It seeks papers that engage with the specific transcultural dynamics of a geographical and historical area containing highly diverse political, social, and religious entities, as well as with the multi-layered connectivities that can be traced in the Italian South, across the Mediterranean, and beyond.

We invite contributions from Art History, Archaeology, History, Anthropology, Paleography, and related disciplines that deal with the cultural diversity of Late Antique and medieval Southern Italy with special attention to sites, monuments, landscapes, images, and objects, as well as to the visual and aesthetic spheres in general. We are primarily interested in exploring horizontal and vertical dynamics, in terms of time (synchronicity/diachronicity) and space (global/Mediterranean/local scales). Papers with a theoretical and historiographical approach are particularly welcome.

Main topics to be addressed might include:

-Artistic contacts and interactions in the Italian South, in a transregional and global perspective
-Centripetal and centrifugal paths of exchange, transmission, and appropriation
-Cross-cultural migration of objects, images, and techniques among spaces, contexts, and media: practices of reuse, appropriation, and interpretation
-Sites, places, and spaces of cultural interactions, such as cities and courts
-Religious interactions in sacred space and rituals
-Local persistence and reinterpretation of the (antique) past in different political and/or cultural scenarios
-The fascination of the (medieval) Italian South, from the 18th century to the present day
-The notion of “Southern Italian”, as it relates to the study of medieval art, and its historiographical consequences

Proposals of max. 1 page should be sent by 20​ ​September 2017 to the editors: escirocco@gmail.com and dirwolf@khi.fi.it. The deadline for the submission of articles is 30 November 2017.

Convivium V/1 will be published in March 2018.

Articles Submission:
Contributions (30,000-40,000 characters including spaces, and up to 15 full-color illustrations) must be sent by 30 November 2017 to Karolina Foletti, executive editor of the journal: karolina.foletti@gmail.com.
Languages accepted: English, French, German, Italian.
Each article will be evaluated through a double-blind peer-review process.

For the Style Guide, please see: http://www.earlymedievalstudies.com/convivium.html

Conference: Max J. Friedländer (1867-1958): art-historian, museum director, connoisseur, Amsterdam, 8th of June 2017

 

20328530979Conference: Max J. Friedländer (1867-1958): art-historian, museum director, connoisseur, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, June 8, 2017
Registration deadline: Jun 5, 2017

The 5th of June 2017 marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Max J.
Friedländer (1867-1958). This milestone offers an excellent opportunity
to reflect on the legacy of this still well-esteemed art historian.
Friedländer was appointed director of the Kupferstichkabinett in 1908,
then subdirector of the Gemäldegalerie in 1912 and finally director of
the latter in 1929. Under the energetic leadership of Wilhelm Bode,
general director of the Berlin museums, Friedländer developed into a
recognised connoisseur and author of over eight hundred publications,
of which Die Altniederländische Malerei (Early Netherlandish Painting)
and Von Kunst und Kennerschaft (On Art and Connoisseurship) are the
best known.

In the history of art history Friedländer is primarily associated with
“connoisseurship”, a competence which he considered most important.
According to Friedländer, connoisseurship embodies a subjective form of
scholarship and can only be gained by practice. The lack of a
theoretical underpinning and the impossibility of factual verification,
however, gradually led to the decline of connoisseurship as a scholarly
method, especially in the academic field.

The symposium aims at highlighting Friedländer’s merits for the history
of art. Specialists from Belgium, Germany, the United States and The
Netherlands will present a diverse range of papers that will call
attention to Friedländer’s work as museum official, scholar and
connoisseur. Moreover, the relevance of connoisseurschip for today’s
art history will be discussed.

The organization of this international symposium is in collaboration
with the RKD – Netherlands Institute for Art History, The Hague, the
University of Bamberg and the CVNK (Contactgroep Vroege Nederlandse
Kunst/Network for specialists in early Netherlandish art).

PROGRAMME

09.00-09.30 Registration and coffee

09.30-09.40 Welcome

09.40-10.00 Suzanne Laemers: Max J. Friedländer, an introduction to a
renowned art historian

Friedländer’s activity at the Berlin museums and his relation with his
colleagues, art dealers and collectors

10.00-10.20 Sandra Kriebel: Exhibiting Berlin private collections: Max
J. Friedländer as curator of loan exhibitions

10.20-10.40 Claire Baisier: Max J. Friedländer and the Antwerp
collector and connoisseur Fritz Mayer van den Bergh (1858-1901)

10.40-11.10 Coffee

11.10-11.30 Catherine B. Scallen: Max J. Friedländer and Duveen Bros.

11.30-11.50 Dr. Timo Saalmann: Connoisseurship in doubt: Max J.
Friedländer, the art market and antisemitism in the early 1930s

11.50-12.20 Discussion

12.20-13.30 Lunch

13.30-13.40 Bart Fransen: Friedländer 3.0: Max J. Friedländer’s Early
Netherlandish Painting as online database

Evaluation of Friedländer’s scholarly contribution to the history of art

13.40-14.00 Simon Elson: The poet or Max J. Friedländer’s art commentary

14.00-14.20 Eveliina Juntunen: Max J. Friedländer and modern
printmaking in Germany. Some thoughts about his influence on its
reception and on the art market

14.20-14.50 Discussion

14.50-15.20 Coffee

The importance of connoisseurship as a method in art history, including
the field of technical study and its rivalry with the learned eye, and
the necessity of teaching connoisseurship

15.20-15.40 Katrin Dyballa: Connoisseurship: A precondition for writing
a collection catalogue

15.40-16.00 Carol Pottasch/Kirsten Derks: The Lamentation by Rogier van
der Weyden (Mauritshuis, The Hague) in the context of traditional
connoisseurship and technical research

16.00-16.20 Milko den Leeuw/Oliver Spapens: Connoisseurship and
technical examination: opposites or complimentary methods?

16.20-16.30 Daantje Meuwissen: Connoisseurship os MA-specialisation at
the VU University Amsterdam

16.30-17.00 Discussion and closing remarks

17.00-18.00 Drinks and possibility to visit the Middle Ages and
Renaissance Galleries

For more information please visit:
https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/nl/friedlander

 

CFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent, 24 – 26 May 18)

N-0186-00-000118-wpuCFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent,
24 – 26 May 18), Ghent, May 24 – 26, 2018
Deadline: Jun 1, 2017
To submit a proposal for consideration, please send a 250 word
abstract, a 100 word bio, and a 1-2 page CV to rediscoveryhna@gmail.com
by June 1, 2017.

Francis Haskell famously argued that the “rediscovery” of early
Netherlandish painting in the nineteenth century was central to the
notions of history and culture that undergirded the rise of the modern
nation-states of Belgium and the Netherlands. This view has been
enriched by recent scholarship on the medieval and Renaissance
revivalist movements that took hold in both countries from about 1840
through the early years of the twentieth century. Yet the complex
relationship between artistic and literary practices of the period and
the emergence of a distinctly northern European history of art remains
largely unexamined, and its implications unacknowledged.

As Léon de Laborde, Camille Lemonnier, Émile Verhaeren, Hippolyte
Fierens-Gevaert, and, slightly later, Johan Huizinga published
pioneering investigations into the world of Van Eyck, Memling, and
Rubens, a similar retrospective spirit animated the artistic
imagination. Painters from Henri Leys to Fernand Khnopff and writers
from Charles De Coster to Maurice Maeterlinck embraced northern
precedents as a key source of inspiration for works that were at once
contemporary and rooted in a rich regional heritage.

This panel aims to explore the interplay between the visual arts and
the nascent field of art history in Belgium and the Netherlands. It
seeks twenty-minute papers which address how artists, critics,
historians, and others working in the Low Countries and abroad
developed diverse perspectives on their past that continue to shape our
understanding of the subject. Papers addressing specific instances of
revivalism and historicism are welcome, as are broader studies of
historiographical and literary trends, which offer insight into how one
era may mediate and even define our vision of another.

Papers must be based on ongoing research and
unpublished. Participants must be HNA members at the time of the
conference.

Panel Chairs: Edward Wouk, Assistant Professor, The University of
Manchester; Alison Hokanson, Assistant Curator, The Metropolitan Museum
of Art