Tag Archives: exclusion

CFP: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019: GENDER AND ALIENS, Durham University, 7th–10th January 2019

In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or ‘strangers’), and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens.

This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the medieval world. Social, political and religious attitudes to aliens and the alienated were not constant over the centuries from c. 400 to c. 1500, and nor were they uniform across the whole world. Some foreigners, as aliens, might end up integrated into the societies they entered; others might find themselves marginalised, lonely or alone; or oppressed, as outlaws, outcasts, or slaves. Gender might exacerbate or mitigate this, depending on time, place and context. Authors or artists depicting parts of the world far from and alien to their own often filled them with people or beings not like them, demonstrating the imaginative power of alterity, while the reactions of those who encountered people from distant places and observed or participated in their customs could include recognition of similarity as well as difference. Foreigners were also not the only people who might find themselves alienated from, or within, certain societies or cultures: the medieval world included many marginalised groups. The issues of aliens and alienation may be differently construed in the modern world, but they are certainly not new. The relationship of gender to these topics is complex, variable and significant.

The conference aims to enable discussion of these issues as they relate to the whole medieval world from c. 400 to c. 1500. The organisers welcome proposals for papers on any topic related to gender and aliens or alienation, broadly construed, and encourage submissions relating to the world beyond Europe. Papers might consider issues such as:

  • refugees, immigrants, emigrants
  • inclusion and exclusion
  • alterity and difference
  • outlaws, the law, legality
  • marginalised or disenfranchised groups
  • non-normative bodies, illness, disability
  • acculturation
  • imagined geographies
  • borders and frontiers
  • ethnicity and identity
  • slavery and slaves

In addition to sessions of papers, the conference will also include a poster session. Proposals for a 20-minute paper or for a poster can be submitted at https://tinyurl.com/gms2019submit by September 30th 2018. The conference organisers are also happy to consider proposals for other kinds of presentation: please contact the organisers at gmsconference2019@gmail.com to discuss these. Some travel bursaries will be available for students and unwaged delegates to attend this conference: please see http://medievalgender.co.uk/ for details.


Images: The Emperor and the Court Lady, from ‘Nüshi zhen’ (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), text composed by Zhang Hua (c.AD 232-300); 6th-8th century. (C) The Trustees of the British Museum

God casts out Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden, in the ‘Old English Hexateuch,’ London, British Library, Cotton Claudius B.iv, f. 6v, 11th century. (C) British Library

 

 

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CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)

025e8b1a81204117a2e5930a561cabe8CFP: 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE THE MIDDLE AGES: A GLOBAL CONTEXT?, 13-15 DECEMBER, 2017, PORTUGAL, LISBON (MEDIEVAL EUROPE IN MOTION RESEARCH GROUP)
How to Apply: Proposals for either 3-paper sessions or individual papers will be equally welcome. Individual papers should be 20 minutes in length. Please submit an abstract of no more that 250 words and a brief CV to mem2017@fcsh.unl.pt
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

NB: Conference Registration Fees:
Participation with Paper: 75€ (Registration fee includes documentation and coffee-breaks);
• Attendance: 30€ for the general public and 25€ for students;
• Gala Dinner: 35€.

In December, as the third year of its six-year Strategic Project draws to a close, the Institute for Medieval Studies – whose research groups have been working around our main theme, “People and Knowledge in Motion: Medieval Portugal in Trans-European Networks” – is hosting a Conference aimed at bringing together scholars from around the world in order to discuss and reassess the research undertaken in the Institute and in the wider academic world on mobility, the circulation of models, and phenomena of a global nature during the Middle Ages. In the course of the last three years, researchers specialising in the areas of History, History of Art, Archaeology and Literature, have developed their research with a strong emphasis on the question of the circulation of men and women, ideas, models and artefacts as mirrors of a medieval reality in which
mental, symbolic and physical mobility seems to correspond less and less to the ancient perceptions and stereotypes of Medieval Men and Society as characterized by stillness and immutability. Furthermore, work in the Institute has raised additional questions and problems intimately connected with the topics being studied, but also very much in line with current historiographical trends. For this reason, the organizers of the 4th International Conference on Medieval Europe in Motion deemed it appropriate to take our principal concern a step further and propose as its main subject the question whether or not it is possible to speak of a Global Middle Ages.
The Conference will seek to provide a forum for scholars from all disciplines who are willing to examine this topic. We invite participation from graduate students, early-career researchers and senior scholars. Papers are warmly welcome whether in English, Portuguese, Spanish, French or Italian.
The three sections of the Conference will be:
1. Debating the Global Middle Ages: Theoretical and Historiographical Approaches;
2. Texts, Images and Representations;
3. Territories and Powers: a “Glocal” Perspective.
Possible topics may include, but are by no means restricted to, the following:
• approaches to sub-global, semi-global and pan-global concepts and the discussion of contact,
exchange, interaction, circulation, integration and exclusion;
• analysis of concepts and case studies concerning diffusion, outreach, dispersal and expansion;
• approaches to concepts of impact, reception, acceptance, transformation and reform.
Selected proceedings will be edited by the Institute of Medieval Studies, as a peer-reviewed e-book, during the course of 2018.