Tag Archives: Collecting

CFP: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 30 October 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 30 October 2017.

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CfP, Louvre Study Day: Collecting Medieval Sculpture, 23rd – 24th Nov 2017

Musée du Louvre, Paris, November 23 – 24, 2017
Deadline: Aug 15, 2017

Ards Study Day 2017
Collecting Medieval Sculpture

Ards, M-Museum Leuven (B) is launching a Call for papers for the 4th
annual colloquium ‘Current research in medieval and renaissance
sculpture’, which will be held in the Musée du Louvre in Paris (FR) on
November 24th  2017.

During the colloquium we will be having keynote speakers on the topic
and a selection of submitted papers in plenum. One day before, on
November 23rd, we will have the opportunity to visit the magnificent
collection of medieval sculpture in the Arts décoratifs Muséum in Paris
as well as other suggested excursions.

This year we are inviting all researchers and curators working
specifically on and with specific sculpture collections or collectors
to submit papers. Firstly, we want to take a look at collecting
medieval sculpture. How did or do medieval sculpture collections get
formed? How has medieval sculpture been collected in the past
(including in the middle ages and renaissance period) and how is this
evolving right now?
We know the prices on the art market are slowly rising as medieval
sculpture is becoming increasingly more interesting as an investment.
Can we take a closer look at what’s happening in that area? In december
2014 the Getty Museum acquired a rare medieval alabaster sculpture of
Saint Philip by the Master of the Rimini Altarpiece at Sotheby’s for no
less than 542,500 GBP. If a small statuette by an anonymous master can
generate this kind of money at a sale, this must mean the ‘market’ for
medieval sculpture is shifting thoroughly.
Moreover, does the exhibition or publication of medieval sculpture
influence this trend? It is a fact that the more we know about an art
piece or artist, the more interesting it becomes to buy or exhibit
them. What are the motifs or instigating factors for museums and
private collectors to collect this intrinsiquely religiously inspired
and therefore (?) ‘less attractive’ discipline. Links can be drawn to
the abolition of churchly instances at the end of the 19th century and
the gothic revival in the 19th century, the export of mainland
patrimony to the United Kingdom.

Would you like to submit a paper for this conference? Your proposal can
be of an art-historical, historical as well as a technical or
scientific nature. Multidisciplinarity is encouraged.

Priority will be given to speakers presenting new findings and
contributions relevant to the specific conference theme. The conference
committee, consisting of sculpture curators from M – Museum Leuven will
select papers for the conference. Submissions that are not selected for
presentation in plenum, can still be taken into consideration for
(digital) poster presentation.There are no fees, nor retribution of
transport and/or lodging costs for the selected papers. After the
conference, presentations will be shared online with the Ards-network
on the website, so please make sure your pictures are copyright cleared.

How to submit your proposal?
– Write in English or French. Presentations are given in English or
French.
– Include a short CV.
– Max. 500 words for abstracts
(excl. authors name(s) and contact details).
– E-mail to marjan.debaene@leuven.be.
– Deadline: 31.08.17.
Successful applicants will receive a notification by 15.09.17.
For more info, visit www.ards.be

CONF: Chivalry Reimagined (Cambridge, 22 May 17)

German, documented 1513–1579 Equestrian Armour of Emperor Charles V

German, documented 1513–1579 Equestrian Armour of Emperor Charles V

The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, May 22, 2017

Armour Study Day
University of Cambridge, 22 May 2017

“Chivalry Reimagined: Collecting and Displaying Renaissance Armour in the Late 19th Century”

When: Monday, 22 May 2017, 9:00-4:30pm
Where: Museum Seminar Room, Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge Who: Open to all, £25 registration fee (includes lunch and tea/coffee)

In nineteenth-century Britain and the United States, a strong affinity for the medieval period permeated contemporary art, literature, and architecture. This interest was mirrored in the art market, and fine and decorative art collectors sought rare objects that romanticized centuries past. Armour was particularly prized among male collectors,
as it embodied the knightly virtues of honour, chivalry, and martial ability.

At this Armour Study Day, historians and curators from some of Europe’s most prominent museums will speak about collecting and display practices of Renaissance armour in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Who were the men that collected these objects, what qualities were considered favourable, and how did collectors and museums choose to display this armour once acquired?

Lunch and tea/coffee will be provided. The day will also include a handling session, giving attendees the opportunity to handle pieces of fifteenth and sixteenth century armour.

Programme:

9:00-9:30am: Registration (via Courtyard Entrance)

9:30-9:45am: Welcome, Tim Knox, Director of the Fitzwilliam Museum

9:45-10:00am: Introductory remarks, Prof. Peter Mandler (University of Cambridge)

10:00-10:45am: Keynote speaker, Angus Patterson (Victoria & Albert Museum), “Ministrations to the Improvement of Society”: Electrotypes of Armour, 1850-1914

10:45-11:15am: Tea/coffee break (Courtyard)

11:15-12:00pm: Victoria Avery (Fitzwilliam Museum), Cambridge Connections and Collections: Arms and Armour at the Fitz

12:00-12:45pm: Stefan Krause (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna), The Imperial Collection of Arms and Armour in Vienna in the 19th and Early 20th Century

12:45-1:45pm: LUNCH (Courtyard)

1:45-2:15pm: Armour-handling session for attendees with Technician Andrew Maloney (Fitzwilliam Museum)

2:15-3:00pm: Victoria Bartels (University of Cambridge), The Courtship of a Collection: William H. Riggs and The Metropolitan Museum of Art

3:00-3:45pm: Tobias Capwell (Wallace Collection), A Museum of a Museum: The Past, Present and Future of the Galleries of Arms and Armour at the Wallace Collection, ca. 1880-2020

3:45-4:00pm: Closing remarks, Prof. Ulinka Rublack (University of Cambridge)

4:00-4:30pm: Afternoon Tea reception (Courtyard)

4:30pm: Delegates and speakers leave (via Courtyard Entrance)

For more information and/or to register, please visit
http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/calendar/whatson/armour-study-day

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting400crop.jpegConference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed.

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome
SECTION I: Ancient and Medieval Collections

(Chair: Cecily Hennessy, Christie’s Education)

10:15 – 10:40 Collecting liturgical objects in thirteenth and fourteenth-century Castile

Maeve O’Donnell-Morales (Courtauld Institute of Art)

10:40 – 11:05 The saint-king’s collection: The treasure of grande châsse in the Sainte-Chapelle

Emily Guerry (University of Kent)

11:05 – 11:30 ‘Through me rulers rule’: A Curious History of Imperial Coronation Regalia

Zoë Opačić (Birkbeck, University of London)

11:30 – 11:55 E.P. Warren, Greek art and the Pan Painter

Amy Smith (University of Reading)

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion
12:10 – 13:40 LUNCH
SECTION II: New Approaches to Collections

(Chair: Sadie Pickup, Christie’s Education) 

13:45 – 14:10 The Digital Pilgrim Project: approaching large collections of miniature art

Amy Jeffs (University of Cambridge)

14:10 – 14:35 From Monastic Libraries to Computer Screens: Collecting Late Antique Illumination through the Centuries

Peter Toth (British Library)

14:35 – 15:00 Collections, Controversies and the Copts: Deciphering the Late Antique Textiles of Egypt

Anna Kelley (University of Birmingham)

15:00 – 15:15 Discussion
15:15 – 15:45 COFFEE & TEA
SECTION III: Private and Public Collections

(Chair: Jana Gajdošová, Christie’s Education)

15:50 – 16:15 The intersection between collecting and scholarship: some personal experience

Michael Carter (English Heritage)

16:15 – 16:40 Exploring the Collection of George R Harding

Naomi Speakman (British Museum)

16:40 – 17:05 Title to be Confirmed

Claudio Corsi (Christie’s, London)

17:05 – 17:15 Discussion
17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks
18:00 Drinks Reception

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference – 23 March 2017

collectingCollecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed. Speakers include: Maeve O’Donnell-Morales, Zoe Opacic, Emily Guerry, Amy Smith, Peter Toth, Amy Jeffs, Anna Kelley, Michael Carter, Naomi Speakman, and Claudio Corsi.

For full programme and tickets, see here.

CFP: Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts: 800 – 1600 (Abstracts due 1 February 2017)

oxford-bodley-ms-rawl-liturg-d-1_00923 June 2017, University of Cambridge

Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts: 800 – 1600 is an interdisciplinary conference that will explore various issues surrounding the complex subject of manuscripts whose parts have become dislodged and subsequently had diverging histories. Our goal is to foster dialogues—between different disciplines—on how to approach dismembered manuscripts from intellectual and practical perspectives.

We will compose panels thematically, grouping papers by geographical and temporal subject rather than by academic discipline. We encourage submissions from scholars, post-graduate students, and professionals in art history, palaeography/codicology, manuscript studies and conservation, digital humanities, history, museum studies, and beyond. Suggested topics include, but are by no means limited to:

  • The manuscript as an object made in layers over time
  • Digital reconstruction of manuscripts
  • New approaches to understanding reception
  • Methodologies for tracing lost/stolen fragments and leaves
  • Methodologies for reconstructing manuscripts
  • Economic, political, and legal consequences of reconstructing manuscripts
  • Reconstructed manuscripts in their original contexts
  • Modern methods of preservation for loose fragments/leaves
  • The art market as a means for fragment/leaf distribution
  • The role of collectors (public institutions and private individuals)

We intend to publish the proceedings from the conference in either a journal, or as a stand-alone anthology.

The Keynote will be given by Dr. David Rundle (University of Essex)
http://www.lostmss.org.uk/fragments-lost-manuscripts-search

Papers will be scheduled for 20 minutes. Please email your abstracts, of no more that 300 words to Dr. Kathryn Rudy and Stephanie Azzarello at reconstructing.mss.cambridge@gmail.com by 1 February 2017. Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and brief biography. We strongly encourage you to consider your paper as a performance, rehearse it well, and to avoid reading directly from the page, if possible. Successful applicants with be notified by 10 February 2017. Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts will take place at the University of Cambridge, Pembroke College, with a dinner to follow.

http://reconstructingmanuscripts2017.wordpress.com

Sponsored by Pembroke College, Cambridge and the University of St Andrews

Collaborative doctoral award: The collection, display and reception of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Sienese paintings in Britain, 1850-1950 at the Courtauld/National Gallery

AHRC COLLABORATIVE DOCTORAL AWARD

Guido da Siena, Coronation of the Virgin, Courtauld Gallery

Guido da Siena, Coronation of the Virgin, Courtauld Gallery

Applications are invited under the Arts & Humanities Research Council Collaborative Doctoral Awards scheme for the project ‘The collection, display and reception of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Sienese paintings in Britain, 1850-1950’.

The successful applicant will be supervised at the Courtauld Institute by Dr Joanna Cannon, and at the National Gallery by Dr Caroline Campbell.  A high degree of preparedness for independent research is expected, including the ability to develop the project and the necessary languages and research skills to carry it out. Applicants will have a master’s degree in Art History or an appropriate related discipline and will be familiar with the study of Italian art of the Trecento and/or Quattrocento, or of British later nineteenth/early twentieth-century interest in Italian Art.

The award is for three years beginning in September 2014 and covers fees and maintenance.  AHRC award eligibility requires the applicant to be resident in the UK for the preceding three years, with no restrictions on the time they may remain in the UK.  EU students are eligible for a full award if they have been resident in the UK for the three years prior to the start of the award.

Please read full details on the project (including eligibility requirements)  here

 Application_form and further_information

If you have any queries about the application process contact pgadmissions@courtauld.ac.uk.

Closing date for applications: 20 June 2014

Interviews are provisionally scheduled for 7 July

Starting date: 29 September 2014

Homepage: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/degreeprogrammes/postgraduate/research#apply