Tag Archives: Collecting

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting400crop.jpegConference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed.

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome
SECTION I: Ancient and Medieval Collections

(Chair: Cecily Hennessy, Christie’s Education)

10:15 – 10:40 Collecting liturgical objects in thirteenth and fourteenth-century Castile

Maeve O’Donnell-Morales (Courtauld Institute of Art)

10:40 – 11:05 The saint-king’s collection: The treasure of grande châsse in the Sainte-Chapelle

Emily Guerry (University of Kent)

11:05 – 11:30 ‘Through me rulers rule’: A Curious History of Imperial Coronation Regalia

Zoë Opačić (Birkbeck, University of London)

11:30 – 11:55 E.P. Warren, Greek art and the Pan Painter

Amy Smith (University of Reading)

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion
12:10 – 13:40 LUNCH
SECTION II: New Approaches to Collections

(Chair: Sadie Pickup, Christie’s Education) 

13:45 – 14:10 The Digital Pilgrim Project: approaching large collections of miniature art

Amy Jeffs (University of Cambridge)

14:10 – 14:35 From Monastic Libraries to Computer Screens: Collecting Late Antique Illumination through the Centuries

Peter Toth (British Library)

14:35 – 15:00 Collections, Controversies and the Copts: Deciphering the Late Antique Textiles of Egypt

Anna Kelley (University of Birmingham)

15:00 – 15:15 Discussion
15:15 – 15:45 COFFEE & TEA
SECTION III: Private and Public Collections

(Chair: Jana Gajdošová, Christie’s Education)

15:50 – 16:15 The intersection between collecting and scholarship: some personal experience

Michael Carter (English Heritage)

16:15 – 16:40 Exploring the Collection of George R Harding

Naomi Speakman (British Museum)

16:40 – 17:05 Title to be Confirmed

Claudio Corsi (Christie’s, London)

17:05 – 17:15 Discussion
17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks
18:00 Drinks Reception

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference – 23 March 2017

collectingCollecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed. Speakers include: Maeve O’Donnell-Morales, Zoe Opacic, Emily Guerry, Amy Smith, Peter Toth, Amy Jeffs, Anna Kelley, Michael Carter, Naomi Speakman, and Claudio Corsi.

For full programme and tickets, see here.

CFP: Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts: 800 – 1600 (Abstracts due 1 February 2017)

oxford-bodley-ms-rawl-liturg-d-1_00923 June 2017, University of Cambridge

Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts: 800 – 1600 is an interdisciplinary conference that will explore various issues surrounding the complex subject of manuscripts whose parts have become dislodged and subsequently had diverging histories. Our goal is to foster dialogues—between different disciplines—on how to approach dismembered manuscripts from intellectual and practical perspectives.

We will compose panels thematically, grouping papers by geographical and temporal subject rather than by academic discipline. We encourage submissions from scholars, post-graduate students, and professionals in art history, palaeography/codicology, manuscript studies and conservation, digital humanities, history, museum studies, and beyond. Suggested topics include, but are by no means limited to:

  • The manuscript as an object made in layers over time
  • Digital reconstruction of manuscripts
  • New approaches to understanding reception
  • Methodologies for tracing lost/stolen fragments and leaves
  • Methodologies for reconstructing manuscripts
  • Economic, political, and legal consequences of reconstructing manuscripts
  • Reconstructed manuscripts in their original contexts
  • Modern methods of preservation for loose fragments/leaves
  • The art market as a means for fragment/leaf distribution
  • The role of collectors (public institutions and private individuals)

We intend to publish the proceedings from the conference in either a journal, or as a stand-alone anthology.

The Keynote will be given by Dr. David Rundle (University of Essex)
http://www.lostmss.org.uk/fragments-lost-manuscripts-search

Papers will be scheduled for 20 minutes. Please email your abstracts, of no more that 300 words to Dr. Kathryn Rudy and Stephanie Azzarello at reconstructing.mss.cambridge@gmail.com by 1 February 2017. Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and brief biography. We strongly encourage you to consider your paper as a performance, rehearse it well, and to avoid reading directly from the page, if possible. Successful applicants with be notified by 10 February 2017. Layers of Parchment, Layers of Time: Reconstructing Manuscripts will take place at the University of Cambridge, Pembroke College, with a dinner to follow.

http://reconstructingmanuscripts2017.wordpress.com

Sponsored by Pembroke College, Cambridge and the University of St Andrews

Collaborative doctoral award: The collection, display and reception of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Sienese paintings in Britain, 1850-1950 at the Courtauld/National Gallery

AHRC COLLABORATIVE DOCTORAL AWARD

Guido da Siena, Coronation of the Virgin, Courtauld Gallery

Guido da Siena, Coronation of the Virgin, Courtauld Gallery

Applications are invited under the Arts & Humanities Research Council Collaborative Doctoral Awards scheme for the project ‘The collection, display and reception of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Sienese paintings in Britain, 1850-1950’.

The successful applicant will be supervised at the Courtauld Institute by Dr Joanna Cannon, and at the National Gallery by Dr Caroline Campbell.  A high degree of preparedness for independent research is expected, including the ability to develop the project and the necessary languages and research skills to carry it out. Applicants will have a master’s degree in Art History or an appropriate related discipline and will be familiar with the study of Italian art of the Trecento and/or Quattrocento, or of British later nineteenth/early twentieth-century interest in Italian Art.

The award is for three years beginning in September 2014 and covers fees and maintenance.  AHRC award eligibility requires the applicant to be resident in the UK for the preceding three years, with no restrictions on the time they may remain in the UK.  EU students are eligible for a full award if they have been resident in the UK for the three years prior to the start of the award.

Please read full details on the project (including eligibility requirements)  here

 Application_form and further_information

If you have any queries about the application process contact pgadmissions@courtauld.ac.uk.

Closing date for applications: 20 June 2014

Interviews are provisionally scheduled for 7 July

Starting date: 29 September 2014

Homepage: http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/degreeprogrammes/postgraduate/research#apply