Tag Archives: Architecture

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Aguilar de Campoo, Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017 (VII Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis)

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Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de Campo (SPAIN), Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017.

CFP for 20-minute ‘free papers’ open until 30 June 2017
How to apply:
send an email with name, Academic institution, 1 page abstract and main bibliography to plhuerta@santamarialareal.org

How to enrol in the conference: email: plhuerta@santamarialareal.org
Price:
Regular 125 € Reduced 90 € Special (students) 60 €

In his The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, the sociologist Émile Durkheim formulated the idea that the division of the world into two domains is the distinctive feature of religious thought, one containing the sacred and the other all that is profane. Durkheim’s distinction cannot be applied to medieval art, however, in which the mixing of secular motifs in religious objects, images, and architecture was characteristic –at least not without complicating the theoretical notion. The senmurf on the eleventh-century reliquary of St. Matthew in SS. Cosma e Damiano in Rome, the figure copied from Orestes on the ancient Husillos sarcophagus above the altar at Fromista, a fragment of victory killing a barbarian from a consular diptych re-used on a 11th/12th century book cover, and the incorporation of diagrams and motifs from natural science in the “aula gotica” in SS. Quattro Coronati in Rome are among myriad examples that document why this is the case.

In one of the best-known texts related to medieval art, Bernard of Clairvaux railed against the imaginative variety of profane art displayed in twelfth-century Cluniac monasteries, which he considered to be a subversion of the moral order of monastic life. Bernard’s diatribe not only confirms the fact that linking the two realms was common but also raises the question of audience and hence also spatiality. As the anthropologist E. E. Evans-Pritchard postulated, sacredness (and therefore the profane) might be considered as situational, in a chronological as well as in a spatial sense. An object considered sacred in a given period may be considered profane or magical in a different time and/or space; decontextualization and reuse are thus also important issues related to the topic. Profane does not always imply anti-sacred. Indeed, given the fact that profanus means “in front of the consecrated enclosure,” the inclusion of secular elements within sacred domains suggests a dynamic interweaving that extends beyond the mere incorporation of motifs and objects. Sometimes the contacts between the two domains was regulated by rites that provided the conditions within which the relationship was made possible (i.e. consecration); other times, as when natural science was assimilated into the choice and manufacture of materials, the overlapping of sacred and profane underlies the processes of art.

In recent decades, historians have explored the uses of subversive elements in sacred art –from marginalia in illuminated manuscripts to coin-imagery and stamping incorporated in Eucharistic hosts. The conference Ars Mediaevalis 2017 sets out to assess the results of the advances made by the new art historiography and, more important, to open up still-unmapped paths for future study of the profane within the sacred during the Middle Ages.

Programme:

Friday, 29th September
Aguilar de Campoo

09.45h : Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis Opening
Chair: Francesca Español UB

10.00h Michele Bacci, Université de Fribourg – Intrusos en los iconos: perspectivas comparativas sobre los retratos individuales en la iconografia sagrada
10.45h Discussion

11.45h Philippe Cordez, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Le repentir d’un magicien ? Les camées de la statuette de David à la cathédrale de Bâle (vers 1320)
12.30h Free paper
12.50h Discussion

16.00h Fernado Villansenor, Universidad de Cantabria – Lo profano y sus espacios: discursos marginales en la Castilla tardogótica
16.45h Javier Docampo, Biblioteca Nacional de España – Las representaciones de los trabajos de los meses en libros de horas: la construcción de un imaginario social
17.15 Discussion

17.45 Round table. “Profano: perímetros espaciales, iconicos y semanticos en el arte medieval / Profane: spatial, iconic, and semantic edges in medieval art” Gerardo Boto.

18.45 Public presentation of the new editorial series “Ars Mediaevalis. Estudios de arte medieval”

Saturday, 30th September
Palencia

(Chair: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños UVA)

10.00h Kathrin Müller, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main Subversive – Devices: Cosmological Diagrams and the Problem of the Sacred
10.45h Free paper
11.05h Discussion

12.00h Beate Fricke, Universität Bern – Representing the Cosmos’ Origins, illuminating cosmological thoughts
12.45h Free paper
13.05h Discussion
16.00h Academic visit: Burgos: Santa María de las Huelgas Reales; Cartuja de Miraflores

Sunday, October 1st
Agilar de Campoo

(Chair: Javier Martínez Aguirre UCM)

09.15h Milagros Guardia, Universitat de Barcelona – Las pinturas murales de Sant Joan de Boi: de como contextualizar la iconografia profana
10.00h Free paper
10.20h Discussion
11.20h Free paper

11.40h Herbert L. Kessler, Johns Hopkins University / Masaryk University – From Vanitas to Veritas: the Profane as a Fifth Mode of Seeing
12.20h Discussion

13.00h Conclusions and perspectives
13.15h Closing ceremony

 

Announcement: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

S.-Maria-gloriosa-dei-Frari-Title-page-1500-500.jpgWhat is the study of the church interior?

The church was a highly meaningful site for pre-Modern European society. As architectural sites accessible to all strata of society, church buildings provided contexts for interaction between social classes and genders, and settings for a wide variety of religious and non-religious activities. From an art-historical perspective, the vast majority of artworks produced in the medieval and Renaissance periods was intended for the many chapels, altars and screens in the church interior.

Yet, despite the obvious importance of these sites, the spatial dispositions of church interiors – and how they evolved over time – are still little-understood. Centuries of restorations and adaptations have radically transformed the appearance and usage of church interiors: screens have been removed; altars shifted position; new liturgical furnishings installed; fresco decoration whitewashed; and seating added or taken away.

Scholars studying the church interior seek to reconstruct the meaning, functions and visual appeal of these sacred spaces. The Society for the Study of the Church Interior seeks to promote this holistic and interdisciplinary approach to researching historic church buildings.

Who are we?

We are a group of scholars who are interested in the material culture, spatial dynamics and multifarious functions of the church interior in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We are mainly based in the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, but welcome members from around the world.

Primarily focused on pre-Modern Italy, we are interested in reconstructing aspects of individual churches, but also in broader issues associated with large-scale changes to architectural layouts generally associated with religious reform. In addition to purely art-historical inquiry, we investigate the religious, political or practical motivations behind transformation campaigns and the effects such changes had on the use of church buildings.

What do we do?

Studying the church interior presents complex challenges for the historian, given that documentary, archaeological and material sources can be fragmentary or even contradictory. Our research involves the analysis of several types of primary and secondary source material, which may include:

  • Original archival documentation such as payments, contracts, testaments, etc
  • Liturgical texts
  • Official records of Visitations conducted by bishops and other clergy
  • Historic ground plans
  • Antiquarian guidebooks
  • Modern restoration records
  • Material evidence of surviving architecture
  • Archaeological reports
  • Provenance of objects such as altarpieces and liturgical furnishings

What are the activities of the Society?

The Society promotes broader engagement with the study of the church interior, disseminates research findings and fosters an academic community of like-minded scholars.

In the future, we hope to organize sessions and meetings at major conferences such as the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting.

We are also in the process of establishing an online, collaborative database to collect data on the church interior. Initially concentrating on Italy, where the impact of the Counter Reformation was particularly strong, the database will reveal the broad patterns and chronologies which are currently beyond the grasp of the individual researcher. Members of the Society who wish to contribute to the database will receive a login to access it: please email Joanne or Michael if you are interested.

Sign up for the mailing list here.

CFP: The Black Prince and Canterbury Cathedral (16-17th November 2017)

Black Prince effigyProposal deadline: Monday, 30th January 2017

Proposals for papers are invited for the two day conference ‘The Black Prince and Canterbury Cathedral’ (working title) to be held at Canterbury Cathedral on the 16th and 17thNovember 2017. The conference is part of a wider project to preserve and research the material culture of the Black Prince held at Canterbury Cathedral and it is supported by the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury and the Heritage Lottery Fund through The Canterbury Journey project.

 

This conference will explore and appraise current and developing studies of the Black Prince, his life, his influence past and present, and will contextualise him within the cathedral setting. A keynote address will be complemented by a series of presentations and panel discussions and unique and unusual access to the architecture of the Cathedral.

The aim of the conference is to offer a vibrant and challenging perspective on the field, review ongoing projects and public and scholarly engagement.

Original proposals are welcome from professionals, rising and established academic scholars and graduate students. Submissions are invited on topics including, but not limited to:

_ Architecture associated with the Black Prince

 _Religion and piety in the 14th century

 _The Black Prince’s Achievements – their construction, provenance and conservation

 _The wider material culture of the Black Prince

 _Women’s history in the 14th century

 _The Black Prince and his spiritual and secular links with Canterbury

 _The funeral and burial of the Black Prince, his tomb, tester and his effigy and their context

 _Literature, music and artistic achievements of the mid to late 14th century

 _The Black Prince and his position in history – changing perspectives

Guidelines for proposals:

Presentations of papers will be 40 minutes in length with an additional 10 minutes for questions.

Papers in this context could be individual or joint presentations, panel discussions or interactive workshops.

Proposals should include the presenter’s name, position and institutional affiliation, the paper’s title, an abstract of up to 250 words, a biography of up to 200 words (written in the third person), and a contact e-mail address.

Proposals for joint presentations or panel discussions should include the above for each speaker, and in the case of a panel discussion a paragraph of up to 250 words describing the panel’s rationale.

Proposals for papers should be emailed to Sarah Turner and Heather Newton by 30th January 2017, using the following email addresses: sarah.turner@canterbury-cathedral.org and Heather.Newton@canterbury-cathedral.org. Informal enquiries in advance of this deadline are welcome.

All presenters will receive their travel and accommodation costs (up to a maximum of £200) and free entry to the conference.

Full registration details will be available in March 2017. Limited student bursaries may be available, more details to follow.

CFP: ‘Autodidacts, Workshops, Academies – Architectural Education 1400 -1850,’ Sixth Colloquium on Architectural Theory at the Werner Oechslin Library, Einsiedeln, April 20 – 23, 2017

800px-geometria_deutsch_08Call for Papers: Autodidacts, Workshops, Academies – Architectural Education 1400 -185o, Sixth Colloquium on Architectural Theory at the Werner Oechslin Library, Werner Oechslin Library, Einsiedeln, April 20 – 23, 2017
Deadline: 5 October 2016

Before the establishment of the major schools of architecture in the
nineteenth century, there were various ways to become an architect,
each with different focuses. A canonical system did not exist. Studies
based on books or travel, apprenticeships in workshops and studios, a
training in the military or building administration, as well as
academic lessons could all be part of the education of a prospective
architect. A talent for drawing was always a prerequisite, as were the
economic possibilities of the surroundings. Aspiring to a secure
position in the military or administration motivated the young
candidates, and family connections and knowledge fostered their
development. Furthermore, beginning in the 17th century, textbooks were
published specifically for the needs of the students. This gradually
led to the consolidation of formats and didactic conditions for
training architects, including (teaching) collections that made
available illustrative material – similar to the artists’ training for
sculptors or painters.

Research to date has focused primarily on architectural training in the
art academies, yet beyond this, no overview considers the other
relevant domains. At this upcoming event, the numerous paths to
knowledge and the varied acquisition of competencies will be presented
and compared in individual studies and analyses. Relying closely on
historical sources, the contributions will enable us to form a general
outline of the topic.

The event addresses architectural theoreticians, architects, art
historians, historians of technology and science, and others, and seeks
to bring together leading experts on the topics as well as, in
particular, young researchers from various countries.

Papers should be limited to twenty-minute presentations.

Languages for paper proposals and presentations: German, English,
French, Italian.  At least a passive knowledge of German is expected of
all participants.

The Foundation assumes the hotel costs for course participants, as well
as for some group meals. Travel costs cannot be reimbursed.

How to Submit: Please send short paper proposals and CVs by e-mail to:
anja.buschow@bibliothek-oechslin.ch

CFP: The Network of Cassinese Arts, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Florence, 16-18 Mar 2017

800px-abbey_of_saint_scholastica2c_subiacoCFP: The Network of Cassinese Arts, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Florence, 16-18 Mar 2017
Deadline: Oct 30, 2016

Organized by Alessandro Nova and Giancarla Periti

From the late fifteenth to the mid sixteenth century, an impressive
corpus of architecture, sculpture, and painting was created to
embellish monastic sites affiliated with the Benedictine Cassinese
Congregation of Italy. A religious order of humanistically trained
monks whose mobility among the network of Cassinese monasteries was
paramount to their spiritual reformed agenda, the Cassinese fruitfully
engaged with the most eminent artists and architects of the early
modern period, supporting the production of imagery and architecture
that was often highly experimental in nature. The Cassinese
Congregation constituted a spiritual infrastructure that spread across
the northern, central and southern regions of Italy, through which not
only monks but also works and models circulated, intersected, and
interacted. The mobility and flow of artists, materials, and motifs
tied together the reformed religious communities affiliated with the
Cassinese Congregation and simultaneously connected an antique with a
modern Christian artistic corpus. This system resulted in a virtual
continuum linking works of architecture, sculpture, and painting,
including the Byzantine church of San Vitale in Ravenna, the Norman
cloister of Monreale (Palermo), and Raphael’s Sistine Madonna in
Piacenza.

Scholarship has presented the Cassinese monks principally as learned
patrons of ambitious but locally-inflected works created by credited
Renaissance masters. But such an approach has obscured the fact that
these modern instances of Cassinese Christian arts existed within a
larger cultural network and coexisted with others of differing value,
including the management of late antique buildings, the preservation of
Byzantine mosaics, and the custody of poorly made votive images in
popular shrines. Not only did these lesser-known episodes assure the
survival of late antique arts, and artifacts of limited aesthetic
appeal, but they also provided occasions for Renaissance masters active
in Cassinese communities to confront alternative forms of antiquity in
a dialogue among the arts for the reinvention of a modern Christianized
art.

The present conference proposes itself as a forum for the task of
reconnecting various artistic episodes that were once Cassinese
initiatives in Renaissance Mediterranean Italy and of re-considering
the spatial monastic settings in which the artworks were originally
placed. Investigating the network of Cassinese arts therefore offers a
fresh occasion to gain new perspectives on a rich body of antique and
Renaissance artworks and their life across time, as well as their
makers’ approaches to past models, recipients’ modalities of viewing
and the pressures put on images as agents of religious reform.

Proposals engaging with all aspects of the network of Cassinese arts
are welcome, with a preference for investigations of little-explored
Cassinese works in southern Italy or new readings of major artworks and
their modes of functioning. Comparative approaches to cycles depicting
rebus-like art forms such as grotesques and hieroglyphs are also of
great interest, as are explorations of the social life of Renaissance
artists building on the evidence that some set up workshops within the
Cassinese precincts while working for the monks. Other topics could
include the appropriation and recycling of Early Christian and
Byzantine materials in Cassinese edifices, the ecological management of
built resources (for example, the transfer of antique columns from San
Vitale in Ravenna to the abbey of Santa Maria del Monte in Cesena) that
served to symbolically link Cassinese monasteries, and considerations
on the Cassinese visual network of the sacred, spreading throughout
Mediterranean Italy by means of copies of primary objects and the
mobility of monks, artists and forms.

How to Submit: Please send your proposal (maximum 400 words) and CV in English, German and/or Italian to Dott.ssa Mandy Richter: Richter@khi.fi.it.

Conference: Obra congrua: Girona Cathedral, 1416-2016, University of Girona, October 19-21, 2016

800px-361_catedral_de_girona2c_rosasses_de_la_nau_vora_l27absisConference: Obra congrua: Girona Cathedral, 1416-2016, University of Girona, October 19-21, 2016

Programme:

Wednesday 19 October 2016
09:00h  Opening of the symposium. Institutional introductions.
09:30h  Opening lecture: La nave de la Catedral de Girona y la cultura del gótico meridional. Pere Freixas.
10:30h  Presentation of the Thematic Network: DOCOGOTHIC Network for documentation of late Gothic architecture Hispanic. Ana López Mozo, Francisco Pinto y Patricia Ferreira.
11:00h  Coffee break.
SESSION I. Consultations and expertises to the Gothic architectural Europe
11:30h  “Deposar de la continuació de dita obra”.  Una relectura de la consulta de Girona (1416). Joan Domenge y Marc Sureda.
12:15h  Les expertises d’architectes dans les cathédrales françaises vers 1500. Florian Meunier.
13:00h  Communications.
13:40h  Debate.
14:00h  Lunch.
15:30h  Parieri e perizie per il Duomo di Milano nel XV secolo. Marco Nobile y Isabella Balestrieri.
16:15h  Communications.
17:00h  Coffee break.
17:30h  Communications.
18:30h  Debate.
18:45h  End of session.
19:15h  Reception at Ajuntament de Girona.
Thursday 20 October  2016
SESSION II. The professional profile master builder.
09:00h  Mestres d’obra catalans convocats a la consulta de 1416. Marià Carbonell.
09:45h  Pere Sacoma, el gran maestro de obras en la Girona del siglo XIV. Miquel Àngel Chamorro.
10:30h  Coffee break.
11:00h  Communications.
11:45h  Inter se disputando. Debate y proyecto arquitectónico en la Edad Media. Javier Ibañez y Arturo Zaragozá.
12:30h  Communications.
13:30h  Debate.
14:00h  Lunch.
SESSION III. Trace and Gothic architecture project.
15:30h  Soporte, escala y proyección en la traza gótica. José Calvo.
16:15h  “Fer e pintar un patró de l’obra”. Algunas consideraciones sobre las trazas en la arquitectura gótica catalana.  Antonio Conejo.
17:00h  Coffee break.
17:30h  Communications.
18:15h  Catedrales dibujadas: reflexiones en torno al dibujo arquitectónico gótico en Castilla. Begoña Alonso.
19:15h  Debate.
19:45h  End of session.
Friday 21 October 2016
SESSION IV. Techniques and Gothic construction processes.
09:00h  Contenido técnico del debate de las actas. Santiago Huerta.
09:45h  La piedra de Girona. Màrius Vendrell i Pere Roca.
10:30h  Coffee break.
11:00h  Construcción de bóvedas. José Carlos Palacios.
11:45h  Communications.
12:30h  Las escaleras de caracol tardogóticas en el ámbito mediterráneo: diseño y construcción. Alberto Sanjurjo.
13:30h  Debate.
14:00h  Lunch.
15:30h  Visit to the Cathedral of Girona. Joan Molina.
17:00h  Closing.

CFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature (2 sessions), IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.

edward_iii_of_england_order_of_the_garterCFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature I and II, IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.
Deadline: September 15, 2016

Organizers: Kristin Bourassa and Justin Sturgeon – Centre for Medieval Literature (University of Southern Denmark/University of York) & Canadian Society of Medievalists/Société canadienne des médiévistes

The increased engagement of late-medieval authors in very precise political conversations, and the way these writers justified their interventions in the political sphere by inserting themselves as characters in their own texts and creating authorial personas, have received increased scrutiny from scholars over the last several years. Some of the challenges of studying this literature include 1) the many recognizable genres involved, with individual texts often incorporating characteristics of multiple genres such as mirrors for princes, autobiography, allegory, travel narrative, and letters; and 2) the tendency to group such literature by language and/or modern national borders, making it difficult to consider medieval political literature in the context of the inter-regional conversations in which it often participated.

These three-paper sessions aim to take a broad and interdisciplinary view, using the term “political literature” to denote any form of writing that had the communication of political messages as one of its main goals. This includes visual elements such as images and marginalia, the physical layout of text and image, and the codicological structure of the manuscripts themselves. The sessions aim to open up the field of late medieval political literature and its manuscripts by thinking outside of modern definitions of genre, disciplinary conventions, and so-called “national” borders, with the broad goal of connecting scholars working in this area from different linguistic traditions and from the disciplinary perspectives of history, art history, and literature. Building on an upcoming workshop (March 2017) on late-medieval political literature in France, Burgundy, and England, our aim is to put literature from these regions into conversation with that produced in other areas. By holding two sessions, we hope to attract papers covering a larger variety of languages and geographical locations than could be accomplished with one session alone, and to build a longer-term network of scholars working on this material.

Questions the sessions might address include: How did authors view their own role as contributors to contemporary political conversations? What textual and/or visual tactics did they use to convey their messages? What audiences did they address? To what extent did writers attempt to criticize and/or support individual or institutional power? And how can considering political literature from interdisciplinary, as well as multiple geographical and linguistic traditions help us to better understand the political conversations taking place in a time of significant “international” problems such as the papal schism and the Hundred Years War? We will particularly welcome papers working from interdisciplinary perspectives and that can broaden our geographical scope.

Contact: Kristin Bourassa, kristin@sdu.dk