Tag Archives: Architecture

Books roundup: New Publications in Art

magdeburger-reiter-255x330GABRIELE KOSTER, UTA SIEBRECHT. Der Magdeburger Reiter, Schnell & Steiner, 2017, 368 p.
ISBN: 978-3795432027

Der Band versammelt Beiträge namhafter Experten aus den Bereichen Restaurierung, Kunstgeschichte, Geschichte und Rechtsgeschichte, die den aktuellen Forschungsstand zum Magdeburger Reiter als bedeutende Skulptur der mittelalterlichen Kunst- und Kulturgeschichte aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven präsentieren.

Der Magdeburger Reiter, entstanden um 1240, gilt als das älteste erhaltene freiplastische Reiterstandbild nördlich der Alpen seit dem Ausgang der Antike und ist damit eine der bedeutendsten Skulpturen der mittelalterlichen Kunst- und Kulturgeschichte Europas. Im November 2015 fand aus Anlass der vollendeten Restaurierung des Kunstwerkes im Kulturhistorischen Museum Magdeburg eine interdisziplinäre Tagung zum Magdeburger Reiter statt.
Der dritte Band der Schriftenreihe des Zentrums für Mittelalterausstellungen widmet sich dem Reiterstandbild als mittelalterliches Kunstwerk, städtisches Wahrzeichen und europäisches Erbe. Erstmals liegt damit eine umfassende Publikation zum Magdeburger Reiter vor. Sie präsentiert fächerübergreifend die wissenschaftlichen Beiträge der Tagung, den Untersuchungs- und Restaurierungsbericht sowie eine umfangreiche Fotodokumentation der bedeutenden Skulpturengruppe.

 

JOSÉ ORFILA. Regards panoramiques sur le monde médiéval et Notre Dame de Reims, Godefroy de Bouillon, 2016, 520 p.JOSÉ ORFILA. Regards panoramiques sur le monde médiéval et Notre Dame de Reims, Godefroy de Bouillon, 2016, 520 p.
ISBN: 978-2841913282

24 figures (en couleurs) et 229 photos (dont14 en couleurs) illustrent ce livre à la gloire de l’architecture du monde médiéval. Depuis plus d’un demi-siècle, la pression toujours renouvelée des esthétiques avant-gardistes a modifié notre vision des choses. Nous avons découvert les mérites des arts les plus lointains et les plus anciens que l’on appelait jadis primitifs et qu’il faut honorer désormais du nom de “premiers”, ce qui les pare d’emblée des plus rares vertus. On est même allé jusqu’à les estimer “plus essentiels”. Rien d’étonnant donc que le gothique, celui des 12eme et 13eme siècles trop élaboré, trop conscient de soi et trop éloigné des pulsions basiques ne soit plus en faveur. De nos jours on se doit d’accorder plus de valeur aux masques africains, aux totems amérindiens et aux statues de l’Ile de Pâques qu’à la Ste Chapelle. Et l’évolution politico-culturelle réactivant les voluptueux mirages de l’Orient qui émoustillaient les mâles romantiques, le Français moyen commence à se sentir plus en phase avec le Tajmahal qu’avec la cathédrale de Reims. Car notre époque est avide de “retours aux sources” à condition que ce soient celles des autres et vénère toutes les traditions sous réserve que ce ne soient pas les nôtres. Ce livre rappelle la richesse de notre civilisation mise à l’écart par les bien-pensants.

 

art-nature-237x330NICOLE R. MYERS (ed.). Art and Nature in the Middle Ages, Yale University Press, 2017, 136 p.
ISBN: 978-0300227055

This splendidly illustrated book explores the universal and multifaceted theme of nature as manifested in Western European art of the Middle Ages. Fascinating essays consider the concept in the context of medieval philosophy, theology, and poetry. The masterpieces highlighted here,  from the distinguished collection of the Musée de Cluny, span the 12th through the 16th centuries and include an impressive array of objects destined for both religious and secular purposes—from exquisite stained glass and carved capitals to spectacular enameled jewelry, illuminated manuscripts, and woven tapestries. Art and Nature in the Middle Ages provides an essential understanding of the symbolism and significance of motifs taken from the natural world, as well as the technical mastery of the medieval artisans who produced these remarkable objects.
Nicole R. Myers is the Lillian and James H. Clark Curator of European Painting and Sculpture at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Visiting Faculty Position in the Department of Architecture and Design at the American University of Beirut

american University of BeirutVisiting Faculty Position in the Department of Architecture and Design at the American University of Beirut

The Department of Architecture and Design in the Faculty of Engineering and Architecture at the American University of Beirut invites applications for a visiting position for one or two semester in the field of History of Art and Architecture, beginning in August 2017.

The Department has two undergraduate programs, one in Architecture and one in Graphic Design, and two graduate programs in Urban Planning and Policy and in Urban Design. Teaching design-related courses at the department applies professional and technical skills within a process that is culturally and theoretically grounded. Art and design disciplines are understood as cultural practices that engage social, economic and political issues and as critical tools of inquiry that integrate process with product and methodology with representation in a multidisciplinary manner. Inquiry through design comes with an acute awareness of our existence in the region with its multitude of languages and cultures and our location within Beirut with its exceptional physical fabric and cultural formats. The discourse on the city is intense and pluralistic. It links the undergraduate and graduate programs of study in Architecture, Graphic Design and Planning and facilitates close interaction between them and with the professional community. The Department is currently working to establish new graduate programs.

A candidate with a Ph.D. in Art History or a closely related discipline is preferred, but ABD with demonstrated teaching experience will also be considered. The candidate will contribute to the teaching of courses in the history of art and architecture sequence and will offer a seminar in the area of his/her specialty. Applicants should be grounded in the art and architecture of the modern period and have a minor specialty in non-Western art, or in the cultures of the Mediterranean rim.

DEADLINE
Applications should be submitted electronically. Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis as of April 30, 2017.

Candidates are invited to submit 1) a letter of application including a brief statement of teaching philosophy and research/creative activity, 2) a curriculum vitae, 3) samples of publications, and 4) the names and full contact information of at least three referees to: Dean of the Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, American University of Beirut,
P. O. Box 11-0236 Riad El-Solh, Beirut, Lebanon 1107-2020 (Digital applications are to be sent to: fea@aub.edu.lb).

The American University of Beirut is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. AUB’s homepage is at: http://www.aub.edu.lb. The website of the department is at: http://www.aub.edu.lb/fea/ard

Conference: Towards an Art History of the Parish Church, 1200-1399

Parish ChurchFriday 2 June 2017
Saturday 3 June 2017

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art

Organised by

Dr James Alexander Cameron: The Courtauld Institute of Art

Meg Bernstein: University of California, Los Angeles / The Courtauld Institute Kress Fellow, 2015-2017

Ticket / entry details:

£26 (general admission to both days) £16 (students and over-60s)

Limited free places available for current Courtauld students (booking required)

Book now via Eventbrite: http://taahotpc.eventbrite.co.uk

Continue reading

CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018

dp300044CFP: Final Conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as Places of Transformation” Bamberg, January 11 – 14, 2018
Deadline: 15 June 2017.

The medieval church portal is in many respects a place of
transformation. At the threshold of a church, various spheres converge
and meet: secular – ecclesiastic, corporeal – spiritual, earthly –
divine. Iconography and formal design offer ample evidence of this
unique situation. At the same time, church portals themselves are
objects of change: their appearances are constantly shifting due to
modification, chromatic reworking and restorative endeavours. After
all, modernism declared portals works of art, and this change of status
was accompanied by a further metamorphosis: The medieval portal became
an aesthetic object and thereby an exhibit with alternative forms of
presentation.

The international final conference of the BMBF Project “Portals as
Places of Transformation” (University of Bamberg, Chair in Medieval Art
History, Professorship in Building Preservation Sciences, Professorship
in Building History and Building Archaeology) will provide various
conference sections focusing on central issues of continuity and change
as they pertain to medieval portals:

Section 1: Conceptual design of medieval portals. The interplay of
architecture and sculpture (building design, design methods,
proportions, room arrangement)

Section 2: Construction of medieval portals. Structural analyses for
the documentation of transformation processes (footing, interlinking of
constructive units, masonry technique, types of stone, structural
analysis, construction process)

Section 3: Iconographic programmes. The portal as a place of spiritual
transformation in the Middle Ages (Iconography, text and image,
eschatological themes, cosmos/cardinal directions)

Section 4: Medieval bronze and wood doors (doors, hinges, mountings,
closing and latching mechanisms)

Section 5: Changing portals. Secular and liturgical use (medieval
procession liturgies, user hierarchy, liturgical dramas and legal acts)

Section 6: Adaptations, alterations and modifications of portals
(restoration layers, renovation measures, surface treatments,
maintenance, supplementation using copies, copying techniques in stone,
plaster und synthetic materials)

Section 7: The portal as a work of art (museum displays, illuminations,
repurposing, virtual presentations and representations)

The conference languages are German, English and French. Please send
your abstract (max. 1500-2000 characters, including spaces) to
Katja.Schroeck@uni-bamberg.de no later than 15 June 2017.

Conference: Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Art, Architecture and Material Culture (13th-16th c.), Nafplion, Wednesday 19th-Sunday 23rd April 2017

751308413_origConference: Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Art, Architecture and Material Culture (13th-16th c.), Nafplion, Wednesday 19th-Sunday 23rd April 2017
Free, booking required: http://mendicants.weebly.com/registration.html
Conference website: http://mendicants.weebly.com/

Programme:
Wednesday, 19 April 2017

9:30 – 10:00      Registration

10:00 – 10:30    Welcoming Addresses

10:30 – 11:00    Ioanna Christoforaki (Academy of Athens)
Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Reviewing the Evidence

11:00 – 11:30     Coffee Break

One Step Beyond: The Mendicants in Constantinople and Dalmatia

11:30 – 11:50     Şebnem Dönbekci (Koç University)
Revisiting the Vita Cycle of Saint Francis in Constantinople: Power and Ideology in the Medieval Mediterranean

11:50 – 12:10      Silvia Pedone (Sapienza Università di Roma) and Nicholas Melvani (Koç University)
Constantinople and the Dominicans: History, Topography, and Monuments on Both Shores of the Golden Horn

12:10 – 12:30     Rafał Quirini-Popławski (Jagiellonian University of Kraków)
Mendicant Art and Architecture in the Black Sea: Pera and Caffa

12:30 – 12:50    Discussion

12:50 – 15:00    Lunch

15:00 – 15:20     Josip Belamarić (Cvito Fisković Centre and University of Split)
Franciscans and Art on the Croatian Coast in the Thirteenth Century

15:20 – 15:40    Zoraida Demori Staničić (Croatian Conservation Institute)
Franciscan Convents in Hvar: Between Cult and Politics

15:40 – 16:00    Nina Kudiš (University of Rijeka)
Venetian Seicento Painters in Franciscan and Dominican Churches of Dalmatia: Some Important Examples

16:00 – 16:20    Ivana Prijatelj Pavičić (University of Split),
Anti-Ottoman Narratives on the Altarpieces of Our Lady of the Rosary and Our Lady of Carmel in the Dominican and Franciscan Churches of Dalmatia

16:20 – 16:40    Discussion

16:40 – 17:00    Coffee Break

17:00 – 17:45     Keynote Lecture
Sophia Kalopissi-Verti (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)
Byzantium ‘Challenged’  after 1204:  Reactions, Responses and their Reflections in Iconography

17:45 – 18:00    Discussion

19:30 – 21:30    Cocktail reception at Nafplia Palace Hotel (speakers only)

Thursday, 20 April 2017

Franciscans and Dominicans in Latin Romania

9:00 – 9:20      Michalis Olympios (University of Cyprus)
Eloquent Marginalia: Figural Sculpture at the Dominican Church in Negroponte (Chalkis, Euboea)

9:20 – 9:40       Demetris Athanasoulis (Ephorate of Antiquities of the Cyclades)
The Church of Saint Francis in Glarentza (Clarence)

9:40 – 10:00    Eleni Barmparitsa (Ephorate of Antiquities of Messenia)
Settlement and Activities of the Mendicant Orders in the Peloponnese during the Late Middle Ages

10:00 – 10:20   Discussion

10:20 – 10:50   Coffee Break

10:50 – 11:10      Panayota Volti (Université Paris-Nanterre)
Some Decorative Elements of the Church of the Virgin in Merbaka, Argolis: A Visual Exegesis of  Dominican History and Spirituality?

11:10 – 11:30       Guy D. R. Sanders (American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Corinth Excavations)
The Archaeology of the Poor at Corinth in the Time of William of Moerbeke OP, Translator of Aristotle, Archimedes, Hero and Galen and Dominican Bishop of Corinth (1278-85)

11:30 – 11:50      Vicky Foskolou (University of Crete)
Reflections of Mendicant Religiosity in the Monumental Painting of the Latin Southern Greek Mainland and the Islands (13th-15th c.)

11:50 – 12:10     Discussion

12:10 – 12:30     Daphne Chronaki (Ephorate of Antiquities of Lassithi)
Παρατηρήσεις στη χωροθέτηση και στις χαράξεις ναών των επαιτικών ταγμάτων στην Κρήτη
[Observations on the planning and proportions of mendicant churches on Crete]

12:30 – 12:50    Eleni Kanaki, Daphne Chronaki and Chara Bilmezi (Ephorates of Antiquities of Herakleion and Lassithi)
Ο ναός του Αγίου Πέτρου των Δομηνικανών στο Ηράκλειο
[The church of Saint Peter of the Dominicans in Herakleion]

12:50 – 13:10     Periandros Epitropakis (Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports)
Το χρονικό της ανασκαφής της μονής του Αγίου Φραγκίσκου Ηρακλείου μέσα από τον τύπο της εποχής
[The chronicle of the excavation of Saint Francis monastery in Heraklion through contemporary press]

13:10 – 13:30     Discussion

13:30 – 15:00   Lunch break

15:00 – 15:20   Olga Gratziou (University of Crete)
The Friars and their Impact on Crete: Material and Visual Evidence

15:20 – 15:40    Kostas Giapitsoglou (Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymnon)
Tο καθολικό της μονής της Αγίας Μαρίας Μαγδαληνής των Δομηνικανών στο Ρέθυμνο
[The katholikon of the monastery of Saint Mary Madgalene of the Dominicans in Rehtymnon]

15:40 – 16:00   Maria Borboudaki (Byzantine and Christian Museum of Athens)
Evidence of Dominican Presence in the Cretan Countryside: A Fresco of Saint Peter of Verona in the Church of Saint George in the Village of Apostoloi Pediados (Herakleion)

16:00 – 16:20   Discussion

16:20 – 16:40    Coffee Break

16:40 – 17:00   Maria Constantoudaki-Kitromilides (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)
Saint Francis and Private Devotion in Venetian Crete: Visual and Archival Evidence

17:10 – 17:30      Chryssa Ranoutsaki (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)
Saint Francis and Saint Catherine: Two Eminent Model Saints of the Mendicant Orders in Medieval Crete

17:30 – 17:50    Nickiphoros Tsougarakis (Edge Hill University)
Re-examining the Franciscan Library of Candia

18:10 – 18:30     Discussion

18:30 – 19:15    Keynote Lecture
Donal Cooper (University of Cambridge)
The Mendicant Orders as Patrons of Art and Architecture in Venetian Herakleion

19:15 – 19:30   Discussion

20:00 – 22:00   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Friday, 21 April 2017

Mendicant Presence in the Crusader Levant

9:30 – 9:50     Margit Mersch (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)
The Development of Local and Trans-Regional Mendicant Architecture: A Comparative Glance on Franciscan Churches on Cyprus and Crete (13th-14th c.)

9:50 – 10:10     Thomas Kaffenberger (Université de Fribourg)
Saint Clare or Saint Dominic? New Observations on the ‘Hagia Fotou’ Ruins in Famagusta

10:10 – 10:30   Maria Paschali (Independent Scholar)
An Image with Our Lady of Carmel in Famagusta and the Interplay of Sanctity, Piety and Power

10:30 – 10:50  Discussion

10:50 – 11:10    Coffee break

11:10 – 11:30      Rehav Rubin and Milka Levy-Rubin (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
How did the Franciscans Choose to Portray Jerusalem?

11:30 – 11:50     Fanny Vitto (Israel Antiquities Authority)
The Cradle of the Carmelites in the Holy Land before Becoming a Mendicant Order

11:50 – 12:10     Barbara Drake Boehm and Melanie Holcomb (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Facing the Forbidden:  Felix Fabri in Medieval Jerusalem

12:10 – 12:30    Discussion

12:30 – 14:30   Lunch break

14:30 – 14:50   Jaroslav Folda (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Artistic Commissions related to the Mendicant Orders in the Thirteenth Century Crusader Levant

14:50 – 15:10     Lucy-Anne Hunt (Manchester Metropolitan University)
Centres and Peripheries: A Perspective on Mendicants and Christian Art in the Crusader States and Muslim Egypt

15:10 – 15:30     Prodromos Papanikolaou (King’s College London)
Artistic Traces of  Franciscan Piety in Hospitaller Rhodes: The Marble Icons of the Virgin and St. John the Evangelist

15:30 – 15:50   Discussion

15:50 – 16:10    Coffee Break

16:10 – 16:30    Amy Neff (University of Tennessee)
Sinai in the Franciscan Visual Imagination

16:30 – 16:50   Manuel Castiñeiras (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)
From Catalonia to Sinai: A Two-Way Journey. Revisiting the Legend of King Abgar in the Saint Francis Altarpiece of Santa Clara in Vic (1414-1415)

16:50 – 17:10    Discussion

17:10 – 17:30    Coffee break

17:30 – 18:15    Keynote Lecture
Michele Bacci (Université de Fribourg)
The Franciscans as Promoters of New Holy Sites

18:15 – 18:30    Discussion

19:30 – 21:30   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Mendicant Art between East and West
9:30 – 9:50      Jean-Pierre Caillet (Université Paris-Nanterre) and Fabienne Joubert (Université Paris-Sorbonne)
Byzantine Sources of the Crucifixion in Italy: Revisiting the Role of the Mendicants

9:50 – 10:10    Emily Guerry (University of Kent)
A Path Prepared for Them by the Lord: Saint Louis, Dominican Diplomacy, and the Odyssey of Jacques and André of Longjumeau

10:10 – 10:30   Krisztina Ilko (University of Cambridge)
Augustinian Friars in the East

10:30 – 10:50  Discussion

10:50 – 11:10    Coffee Break

11:10 – 11:30      Helen Evans (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
The Franciscans among the Armenians

11:30 – 11:50     Ioanna Rapti (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
Armenian Αrt and the Μendicant Οrders in the East: Εncounters and Ιnteractions

11:50 – 12:10     Lauren Arnold (University of San Francisco)
Armenian Carpets in Early Renaissance Paintings: The Mendicant Orders and their Role in Facilitating a Migration of Eastern Christians to Italy (1250-1500)

12:10 – 12:30    Discussion

12:30 – 14:30   Lunch break

Round Table Discussion
14:30 – 17:00
Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies
(conference speakers only)

Welcoming Address: Dr Christos Giannopoulos (Center for Hellenic Studies)

Coordinator:  Ioanna Christoforaki (Academy of Athens)

Louise Bourdua (University of Warwick)
Anne Derbes (Hood College)
Julian Gardner (University of Warwick)
Maria Georgopoulou (The Gennadeios Library, ASCSA)
Maria Vassilaki (University of Thessaly)
Gerhard Wolf (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max Planck Institut)

17:00 – 17:30   Afternoon Coffee

19:30 – 21:30   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Sunday, 23 April 2017
(conference speakers only)

Excursion to medieval monuments in the Argolis (Agia Moni in Nafplion and Church of the Virgin in Merbaka) in the morning. Visit to the new Byzantine Museum in Argos, followed by a guided tour of the Corinth excavations by Guy Sanders in the afternoon.

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Aguilar de Campoo, Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017 (VII Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis)

fsmlrph_capitelmonasterio_rom_cvalle

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de Campo (SPAIN), Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017.

CFP for 20-minute ‘free papers’ open until 30 June 2017
How to apply:
send an email with name, Academic institution, 1 page abstract and main bibliography to plhuerta@santamarialareal.org

How to enrol in the conference: email: plhuerta@santamarialareal.org
Price:
Regular 125 € Reduced 90 € Special (students) 60 €

In his The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, the sociologist Émile Durkheim formulated the idea that the division of the world into two domains is the distinctive feature of religious thought, one containing the sacred and the other all that is profane. Durkheim’s distinction cannot be applied to medieval art, however, in which the mixing of secular motifs in religious objects, images, and architecture was characteristic –at least not without complicating the theoretical notion. The senmurf on the eleventh-century reliquary of St. Matthew in SS. Cosma e Damiano in Rome, the figure copied from Orestes on the ancient Husillos sarcophagus above the altar at Fromista, a fragment of victory killing a barbarian from a consular diptych re-used on a 11th/12th century book cover, and the incorporation of diagrams and motifs from natural science in the “aula gotica” in SS. Quattro Coronati in Rome are among myriad examples that document why this is the case.

In one of the best-known texts related to medieval art, Bernard of Clairvaux railed against the imaginative variety of profane art displayed in twelfth-century Cluniac monasteries, which he considered to be a subversion of the moral order of monastic life. Bernard’s diatribe not only confirms the fact that linking the two realms was common but also raises the question of audience and hence also spatiality. As the anthropologist E. E. Evans-Pritchard postulated, sacredness (and therefore the profane) might be considered as situational, in a chronological as well as in a spatial sense. An object considered sacred in a given period may be considered profane or magical in a different time and/or space; decontextualization and reuse are thus also important issues related to the topic. Profane does not always imply anti-sacred. Indeed, given the fact that profanus means “in front of the consecrated enclosure,” the inclusion of secular elements within sacred domains suggests a dynamic interweaving that extends beyond the mere incorporation of motifs and objects. Sometimes the contacts between the two domains was regulated by rites that provided the conditions within which the relationship was made possible (i.e. consecration); other times, as when natural science was assimilated into the choice and manufacture of materials, the overlapping of sacred and profane underlies the processes of art.

In recent decades, historians have explored the uses of subversive elements in sacred art –from marginalia in illuminated manuscripts to coin-imagery and stamping incorporated in Eucharistic hosts. The conference Ars Mediaevalis 2017 sets out to assess the results of the advances made by the new art historiography and, more important, to open up still-unmapped paths for future study of the profane within the sacred during the Middle Ages.

Programme:

Friday, 29th September
Aguilar de Campoo

09.45h : Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis Opening
Chair: Francesca Español UB

10.00h Michele Bacci, Université de Fribourg – Intrusos en los iconos: perspectivas comparativas sobre los retratos individuales en la iconografia sagrada
10.45h Discussion

11.45h Philippe Cordez, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Le repentir d’un magicien ? Les camées de la statuette de David à la cathédrale de Bâle (vers 1320)
12.30h Free paper
12.50h Discussion

16.00h Fernado Villansenor, Universidad de Cantabria – Lo profano y sus espacios: discursos marginales en la Castilla tardogótica
16.45h Javier Docampo, Biblioteca Nacional de España – Las representaciones de los trabajos de los meses en libros de horas: la construcción de un imaginario social
17.15 Discussion

17.45 Round table. “Profano: perímetros espaciales, iconicos y semanticos en el arte medieval / Profane: spatial, iconic, and semantic edges in medieval art” Gerardo Boto.

18.45 Public presentation of the new editorial series “Ars Mediaevalis. Estudios de arte medieval”

Saturday, 30th September
Palencia

(Chair: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños UVA)

10.00h Kathrin Müller, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main Subversive – Devices: Cosmological Diagrams and the Problem of the Sacred
10.45h Free paper
11.05h Discussion

12.00h Beate Fricke, Universität Bern – Representing the Cosmos’ Origins, illuminating cosmological thoughts
12.45h Free paper
13.05h Discussion
16.00h Academic visit: Burgos: Santa María de las Huelgas Reales; Cartuja de Miraflores

Sunday, October 1st
Agilar de Campoo

(Chair: Javier Martínez Aguirre UCM)

09.15h Milagros Guardia, Universitat de Barcelona – Las pinturas murales de Sant Joan de Boi: de como contextualizar la iconografia profana
10.00h Free paper
10.20h Discussion
11.20h Free paper

11.40h Herbert L. Kessler, Johns Hopkins University / Masaryk University – From Vanitas to Veritas: the Profane as a Fifth Mode of Seeing
12.20h Discussion

13.00h Conclusions and perspectives
13.15h Closing ceremony

 

Announcement: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

S.-Maria-gloriosa-dei-Frari-Title-page-1500-500.jpgWhat is the study of the church interior?

The church was a highly meaningful site for pre-Modern European society. As architectural sites accessible to all strata of society, church buildings provided contexts for interaction between social classes and genders, and settings for a wide variety of religious and non-religious activities. From an art-historical perspective, the vast majority of artworks produced in the medieval and Renaissance periods was intended for the many chapels, altars and screens in the church interior.

Yet, despite the obvious importance of these sites, the spatial dispositions of church interiors – and how they evolved over time – are still little-understood. Centuries of restorations and adaptations have radically transformed the appearance and usage of church interiors: screens have been removed; altars shifted position; new liturgical furnishings installed; fresco decoration whitewashed; and seating added or taken away.

Scholars studying the church interior seek to reconstruct the meaning, functions and visual appeal of these sacred spaces. The Society for the Study of the Church Interior seeks to promote this holistic and interdisciplinary approach to researching historic church buildings.

Who are we?

We are a group of scholars who are interested in the material culture, spatial dynamics and multifarious functions of the church interior in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We are mainly based in the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, but welcome members from around the world.

Primarily focused on pre-Modern Italy, we are interested in reconstructing aspects of individual churches, but also in broader issues associated with large-scale changes to architectural layouts generally associated with religious reform. In addition to purely art-historical inquiry, we investigate the religious, political or practical motivations behind transformation campaigns and the effects such changes had on the use of church buildings.

What do we do?

Studying the church interior presents complex challenges for the historian, given that documentary, archaeological and material sources can be fragmentary or even contradictory. Our research involves the analysis of several types of primary and secondary source material, which may include:

  • Original archival documentation such as payments, contracts, testaments, etc
  • Liturgical texts
  • Official records of Visitations conducted by bishops and other clergy
  • Historic ground plans
  • Antiquarian guidebooks
  • Modern restoration records
  • Material evidence of surviving architecture
  • Archaeological reports
  • Provenance of objects such as altarpieces and liturgical furnishings

What are the activities of the Society?

The Society promotes broader engagement with the study of the church interior, disseminates research findings and fosters an academic community of like-minded scholars.

In the future, we hope to organize sessions and meetings at major conferences such as the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting.

We are also in the process of establishing an online, collaborative database to collect data on the church interior. Initially concentrating on Italy, where the impact of the Counter Reformation was particularly strong, the database will reveal the broad patterns and chronologies which are currently beyond the grasp of the individual researcher. Members of the Society who wish to contribute to the database will receive a login to access it: please email Joanne or Michael if you are interested.

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