Tag Archives: Architecture

Symposium: Winchester, Early Medieval Power and Faith

Screen Shot 2018-09-19 at 9.35.28 AMA one-day symposium dedicated to exploring the great churches of Winchester at the time of the Anglo-Saxons and Normans.

Saturday 20 October 2018

9.30am – 5.00pm

The King Alfred Conference Chamber, Guildhall, Winchester, SO23 9GH

Join historians, experts, and enthusiasts at this one day symposium exploring the great churches of Winchester at the time of the Anglo-Saxons and Normans. This symposium will cover everything from grand church architecture, manuscript studies, Anglo-Saxon folklore, and early Norman politics and relationships with Winchester.

Register by 1 October and receive the early bird price of only £55.

For more information, please visit https://www.hampshireculture.org.uk/winchester-early-medieval-power-faith.

Winchester, Early Medieval Power and Faith is the third public event of Winchester, The Royal City, a project which aims to celebrate and promote the ancient city as a centre of key significance to the development of England and English Culture.

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CFP: Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture (Princeton, 5-6 Apr 19)

nevski80Princeton University, April 5 – 06, 2019
Deadline: Aug 15, 2018

Eclecticism at the Edges: Medieval Art and Architecture at the Crossroads of the Latin, Greek, and Slavic Cultural Spheres (c.1300-c.1550)

Organizers:
Alice Isabella Sullivan, Ph.D. (University of Michigan)
Maria Alessia Rossi, Ph.D. (The Index of Medieval Art, Princeton University)

Description:
In response to the global turn in art history, this two-day symposium explores the temporal and geographic parameters of the study of medieval art, seeking to challenge the ways we think about the artistic production of Eastern Europe. Serbia, Bulgaria, and the Romanian principalities of Wallachia, Moldavia, and Transylvania, among other centers, took on prominent roles in the transmission and appropriation of western medieval, byzantine, and Slavic artistic traditions, as well as the continuation of the cultural legacy of Byzantium in the later centuries of the empire, and especially in the decades after the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

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Secret Spaces: Medieval Sacristies, Vestries, Treasure Rooms and their Contents

salisbury-cathedral_549x432

Salisbury Cathedral Treasure House, Upper Champber, from “Pituresque Memorials of Salisbury” by Peter Hall (1834), courtesy of the Society of Antiquaries.

The aim of the conference is to introduce the subject of ecclesiastical treasure houses to both the academic world and the wider public.

Treasure houses take the form of small buildings attached as annexes to the cathedrals and churches which they served. Their function as store houses of the priceless ecclesiastical treasure belonging to the church meant that they were accessible to only a few privileged individuals but many are resplendent pieces of architecture in their own right. Recently Yves Gallet, in discussing an ambitious vault within the thirteenth-century treasure house of Saint-Urbain, Troyes, noted that ‘it is curious that they should have placed such a spectacular and up-to-date ornament in a place where it was never going to be seen’. Notable treasure houses in Britain are attached to the cathedrals of Canterbury, Lincoln, Wells, and Bristol, to name but a few. However, medieval ecclesiastical treasure houses existed everywhere in the medieval West and this will be reflected in the conference, which will bring together scholars from different countries. Ecclesiastical treasure houses also stored money, the presence of which necessitated the activities of depositing, guarding and counting. The ecclesiastical treasure house thus occupied a fault line between two opposing ideologies in medieval Christian thinking, the first condemning the accumulation of worldly treasure and the second promoting its use for God’s service.

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Arte, Architettura e Umanesimo a Bologna, 1446-1530 (Bologna, 13-15 Jun 2018)

humanism, bolognaBologna (Italia), June 13 – 15, 2018

Dipartimento delle Arti, Complesso di S. Cristina, piazzetta G. Morandi 2 – Bologna

Bologna non è unanimemente riconosciuta come una delle capitali dell’Umanesimo, al pari di Firenze e Padova. Tuttavia la qualità delle scelte operate in campo artistico sottintende un rinnovamento culturale che gli studi moderni hanno cominciato a indagare. Da sempre crocevia di esperienze, anche nel Rinascimento Bologna riuscì a produrre e attrarre talenti d’eccellenza che seppero naturalizzarsi nel contesto cittadino e ricavarne nuovi spunti di riflessione e di creazione. Ne nacque, anche grazie all’ambiziosa magnificenza del clan bentivolesco e alla perdurante vitalità dell’antico Studium, una civiltà figurativa, architettonica e letteraria omogenea e ben connotata, capace di muoversi tra stravaganze eccentriche e punte di rustica classicità. Un processo che non si interruppe nemmeno dopo la traumatica cacciata degli stessi Bentivoglio, ma che anzi toccò un apice nel 1530, quando la solenne incoronazione di Carlo V riportò Bologna al centro della scena continentale.
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CONF: An Abbey Between Two Worlds San Nicolò in San Gemini and the Dislocation of Monumental Artworks in the first Half of the 20th Century (8-9 June 2018)

San Nicolo doorway

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Abbey’s restoration (1967-2017), the conference will address the phenomenon of legal exportation and reinstallation of monumental

complexes and oversized artworks in the first half of the 20th century. The Abbey’s portal, which arrived in the United States in 1936 and stands today at the entrance of the medieval collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, will serve as the starting point to examine the circumstances around the exportation of works from Italy until the Second World War.

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CFP: Crossing Rivers in Byzantium and Beyond (Vienna, 2-3 Nov 18) (Deadline 1 June 18)

Crossing Rivers in Byzantium and Beyond

Department of Art History, University of Vienna, 02. – 03.11.2018
Deadline: Jun 1, 2018

“It is always dramatic to cross a frontier, even though the frontier is only a brook”
(V. S. Pritchett, Geographical Magazine, December, 1942)

This workshop is organized as part of the project “Byzantine Stone Bridges: Material Evidence and Cultural Meaning,” managed by Dr. Galina Fingarova at the Department of Art History of the University of Vienna. It is generously funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), Elise-Richter-Program. For further information, see http://bridges.univie.ac.at/.

This project focuses on a long-overlooked aspect of architectural and cultural history – Byzantine stone bridges. It investigates the particularities of this type of architectural monuments built from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries on territories under imperial Byzantine rule. It addresses the following enquiries: 1) reconstructing the
significance of Byzantine stone bridges in the context of architectural history by analyzing the structural and technical innovations that are evident in the preserved monuments; and 2) understanding the importance of bridges as sources for a Byzantine cultural and social history, in particular, on a political, symbolic, and metaphorical level.

This workshop will expand on the project’s research questions and methodological approaches by placing these in a broader context. The workshop encourages an interdisciplinary discourse on the unique characteristic of rivers to define territories and boundaries and on their crossing as a means of connection in a real and figurative sense. It seeks to transcend both the territorial and chronological limits of the Byzantine Empire.

Confirmed Keynote: Professor Jim Crow (University of Edinburgh)

Scholars working in the fields of Roman, Late Antique, Byzantine, Medieval, Ottoman, and Middle Eastern Studies
are invited to submit proposals for 20-minute papers connected with but not limited to the following topics:
• Riverine landscapes;
• River crossings as political, social, military, or commercial events;
• Urban and rural communities on and along rivers;
• Architectural and engineering achievements in hydrology;
• Ford and ferry;
• Pontoon, wooden, and stone bridges;
• Related structures such as aqueducts, mills, etc.;
• Mythological and religious aspects of river crossings;
• Emotional experiences at or traversing rivers.

Please send proposals of no more than 300 words, including a title and an abstract, together with a short CV to Dr. Galina Fingarova (galina.fingarova@univie.ac.at) by June 1, 2018.