Tag Archives: manuscript studies

Internship in Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts

Thanks to external funding, the British Library is pleased to be able to offer an internship in the Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts section of the Western Heritage Department, for doctoral and post-doctoral students in History, Art History, Medieval Language or Literature or another relevant subject.

Large zoo-anthropomorphic initial from the Historia naturalis of Pliny the Elder, Arundel MS 98, f. 85v

Large zoo-anthropomorphic initial from the Historia naturalis of Pliny the Elder, Arundel MS 98, f. 85v

The focus of the internship will be to enhance our Explore Archives and Manuscripts online catalogue, by creating or enriching catalogue entries for medieval manuscripts and publicising them in blog posts and other interpretative material. The intern will assist curators working on The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200. This may involve writing or researching short descriptions of manuscripts and groups of manuscripts. The intern will be involved in others aspects of the work of the Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts section, including responding to enquiries and providing talks for students and visitors, thereby gaining insight into various curatorial duties and aspects of collection care. During the internship at the British Library, the intern will enjoy privileged access to printed and manuscript research material, and will work alongside specialists with wide-ranging and varied expertise.

This internship is designed to provide an opportunity for the intern to develop research skills and expertise in medieval history and manuscripts, and in presenting manuscripts to a range of audiences. Previous interns have given feedback that they felt a valued member of the team, gained professional confidence and developed their career by carrying out a ‘real’ job with specific duties.

The programme is only open to students who are engaged actively in research towards, or have recently completed a PhD in a subject area relevant to the study of medieval manuscripts and who have a right to work in the UK full time.

The term of internship is full time (36 hours per week over 5 days) for 6 months. The salary is £9.75 per hour, which is the current London Living Wage. The internship will start in July 2017 or as soon as relevant security checks have been completed.

To apply, please visit www.bl.uk/careers.

Applicants are asked to include answers to the following questions within their Supporting Statement:

  1. Please give examples of your experience in cataloguing medieval manuscripts. 2. Please provide examples of your experience in writing about your research or about manuscripts for a general audience.

Closing Date: 1 May 2017

Interviews will be held on 19 May. The selection process may include questions about the date and origin of a particular manuscript to be shown at the interview.

Fully Funded PhD Studentship in Early Medieval History

Based in the Department of History at the University of Exeter, this studentship will contribute to the HERA-funded project ‘After Empire: Using and Not Using the Past in the Crisis of the Carolingian World, c. 900-c.1050’ (UNUP). This international project, based in Berlin, Vienna, Barcelona, St Andrews and Exeter, seeks to offer a transnational approach to the history of Europe in the tenth century.  It takes as its starting point the observation that the relatively meagre administrative and legal structures of early medieval Europe meant that action in the present often drew authority and legitimacy from claims about the past. It explores how people in different regions of Europe reacted to the changing political landscape of the tenth century by looking at the ways they chose to use and not use their shared past. 

The PhD project will explore aspects of this question. The Exeter-led sub-theme is on ‘Using and Not Using the Past in Liturgical Sources’. It is anticipated that this particular research project will focus on how at least one religious community chose to use or not use their past through the study of the liturgical manuscripts they produced and owned in this period.  The thesis will make a case study of individual manuscripts produced in a single community: both the manuscripts and community will be selected by the student in consultation with the supervisors. The core aims of the research project will be to investigate the extent to which a community, either in the heartland or on the periphery of the Carolingian Empire, chose to use or not use earlier works in the compilation of tenth-century liturgical books, and why they chose the particular source texts they did.

Alternative research projects of equal relevance to the wider themes of the project will also be considered.

The student will be supervised by Professor Sarah Hamilton, who is the project lead for UNUP at Exeter, with Dr Levi Roach.   

Duration and value of award
The PhD will commence in September 2016. UK/EU level tuition fees will be paid as part of the studentship, together with an annual maintenance grant of £14,296. Please note that this studentship is open to UK/EU students only.

For more information, see: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/studying/funding/award/?id=2218

CFP: In Search of Wisdom: Knowledge Spaces and Networks across the Mediterranean Sea  November 2nd, 3rd, and 4th 2016

Call_Diptico.pptxIn Search of Wisdom: Knowledge Spaces and Networks across the Mediterranean Sea

10th COMPLUTENSE CONFERENCE ON MEDIEVAL ART

NOVEMBER 2nd, 3rd, AND 4th  2016

RESEARCH PROJECT: “Al-Andalus, the Hispanic Kingdoms and Egypt: Art, Power and Knowledge in the Medieval Mediterranean. Exchange Networks and their impact on the Visual Culture”(HAR2013-45578-R)

The aim of this conference is to deepen into the various insights of the construction of spaces and the production of works of art linked to sciences and knowledge in the Middle Ages, throughout different geographical, cultural, and social realms within the Mediterranean area.

 CALL FOR PAPERS  

Paper proposals should include an abstract of the issue written in Spanish, English or French languages (a maximum of ca. 1,000 words), a bibliographical reference’s list on the subject (a maximum of 10 references), and a short Curriculum Vitae of the submitter (a maximum of ca. 500 words).  Proposals should be framed within one of the four indicated sessions by the submitter. Priority will be given to those innovative approaches, critical analyses or insights into the specific framework of the session topics, especially those linked to al-Andalus, Hispanic Kingdoms or Medieval Egypt. Proposals should be send to jcam@ucm.es before June, 15th 2016; once they have been selected by the scientific committee, their acceptance will be notified to authors before June, 30th 2016.

SESSIONS

  1. “Mirror of Princes: paideia, uirtus and adab” is focused on secular places of knowledge.
  2. “Science and its usages” deals with those spaces and networks where medieval science was developed.
  3. “Books and their spaces” is devoted to the production of Medieval manuscripts and the places for books.
  4. “Masters, sages, and patrons” analyzes the relationship between patrons, artisans, and knowledge producers, paying special attention to synergies of all those linked to scientific development.

 INVITED CONTRIBUTORS

Evelyne Berriot-Salvadore (Université Montpellier 3), Eduardo Carrero (UAB), Miquel Forcada (UB), Ángel Fuentes Domínguez (UAM), Emilio González Ferrín (Universidad de Sevilla), Alfonso Jiménez (Universidad de Sevilla), Miguel Marañón (Instituto Cervantes), Rafael Ramón Guerrero, María Jesús Viguera (UCM), Gerhard Wolf (Kuntshistorisches-Max Planck Institute, Florencia).

SCIENTIFIC AND ORGANISING COMMITTEE

Alexandra Uscatescu e Irene González Hernando (coordinadoras), Susana Calvo Capilla, Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza, Azucena Hernández Pérez, Víctor Rabasco García, Pilar Martínez Taboada, Herbert González Zymla, Noelia Silva Santa-Cruz, Javier Martínez de Aguirre, Marta Poza Yagüe, Óscar Monterreal, Elena Paulino, Manuel Parada y Laura Molina.

 

CFP: Revealing Records VII (Friday, May 6th, 2016)

Sealed Record.axdDeadline:   Friday, 19 February 2016

Now in its seventh year, the Revealing Records conference series brings together postgraduate researchers working with a wide range of sources from across the medieval world to share challenges and approaches through the presentation of their research.  This year marks the first year of Revealing Records as a combined effort of King’s College London and University College London History Departments. The conference will be held in the Anatomy Museum, King’s College London, on Friday, May 6th, 2016.

Keynotes will be delivered by Dr Rory Naismith (KCL) and Dr Sergei Bogatyrev (UCL)

We encourage applications from students working with a wide variety of records – from the written word to objects, buildings and more. Papers that employ an interdisciplinary approach, drawing upon palaeography, archaeology or other related disciplines are particularly welcome.

Abstracts (300 words max.) are welcome from students wishing to present a 20-minute paper.

Please send abstracts to: revealingrecords@gmail.com by Friday, 19 February 2016

Visit our webpage for more information: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/history/eventrecords/2015-16/rrVIII.aspx

King’s College London – Revealing Records VII 

www.kcl.ac.uk

Workshop: ‘The world comes to Sinai: Saint Catherine’s monastery as a cultural magnet’ (London 6 February 2016)

St. Catherine's Monastery SinaiThe World Comes to Sinai:
St Catherine’s Monastery and its Library
as a Cultural Magnet
A Workshop-Conference of the Saint Catherine Foundation
Saturday, 6 February 2015, 10.00 to 13.00
Bridgewater House
14 Cleveland Row, SW1A 1DP, London

 

Programme
10.00 Welcoming Remarks
Jenny Richardson, Treasurer, Saint Catherine Foundation
10.10 How Did Syriac Manuscripts Get to Sinai?
Sebastian Brock, Department of Oriental Studies, Oxford
University
10.35 Visitors from Christian Orient and the Palimpsested Manuscripts
Claudia Rapp, Department of Byzantine and Modern Greek
Studies, Vienna University
11.00 Break
11.30 Sinai and the Market for Printed Books
Nicholas Pickwoad, Ligatus Centre, University of the Arts,
London
11.55 A View to the Future: The New Library Wing
Petros Koufopoulos, Department of Architecture,
University of Patras, Greece
12.20 Discussion, followed by Coffee and Conversation
RSVP:
secretary@saintcatherinefoundation.org
+44 (0) 20 7396 5420
Admission free

Conference: History Books in the Anglo-Norman World (Trinity College Dublin, 22-23 May 2015)

22-23 May 2015
Trinity College Dublin
Synge Theatre, Arts Building

Cost: €25.00 (€15.00 concessions and/or one-day attendance; TCD staff and students free).
Please register by contacting Laura Cleaver (cleaverl@tcd.ie).

22nd May 2015
From 13.00: registration
13.30 welcome and introduction to the History Books in the Anglo-Norman World
Project (Laura Cleaver)
14.00-15.30 session 1:
Anne Lawrence-Mathers (University of Reading), Computus, Chronology and the Calculation of Time in English Twelfth-Century Chronicles.
Michael Staunton (University College Dublin), Did the Purpose of English History Change During the Twelfth Century?
Mark Zumbuhl, [tbc]

15.30-16.00 tea

16.00-17.30 session 2:
Andrea Worm (University of Graz), England’s Place Within Salvation History in a Thirteenth-Century Copy of Peter of Poitiers’ Compendium historiae (British Library, Cotton MS Faustina B VII).
Diarmuid Scully (University College Cork), The Vision of History in a Manuscript of Gerald of Wales’ Topographia Hibernica and Expugnatio Hibernica (National Library of Ireland, MS 700).
Caoimhe Whelan (Trinity College Dublin), A New Version of an Old Story: Reading the Past in Late Medieval Ireland.

18.00 wine reception

23rd May
9.30-11.00 session 3:
Gleb Schmidt (University College, Saint Petersburg), The Circulation of
Manuscripts Containing Excerptum Roberti Herefordensis de Chronica Mariani
Scotti in the Anglo-Norman World.
Laura Pani (University of Udine), Paul the Deacon’s Historia Langobardum in
Anglo-Norman England.
Jaakko Tahkokallio (King’s College London), The Twelfth-Century Audience of
William of Malmesbury, Henry of Huntingdon and Geoffrey of Monmouth in the
Light of the Codicological Evidence.

11.00-11.30 coffee

11.30-12.30 session 4:
Charlie Rozier (Durham University), Durham Cathedral Priory and its Library of History, c.1090-c.1130.
Stephen Church (University of East Anglia), King John’s Books.

12.30-13.30 lunch

13.30-15.00 session 5:
Benjamin Pohl (Ghent University), An Illustrated Chronicle from Early Eleventh-
Century Normandy: Dudo of St. Quentin’s Historia Normannorum.
Laura Slater (University of York), Picturing the Past in Matthew Paris’ Vie de
Seint Auban.
Jane Gilbert (University College London), Translating History: British Library,
Royal MS 20 A ii.

15.00-15.30 tea

15.30-16.30 session 6:
Kathryn Gerry (Memphis College of Art), Artists, Abbots and Saints: Visual and Material Approaches to Cult at St Albans Abbey in the Long Twelfth Century.
Diarmuid O Riain, Marginally Wrong: The Canterbury Tale Behind the Confusion of Two Irish Saints in Marsh’s Library MS Z 3.1.5.
16.30 closing remarks

Reading, Scholarship and the Art of the Book at Reading Abbey (Reading University, 17 April 2015)

K151514[1]Reading University, Henley Business School, Whiteknights Campus, Room G10

17 April 2015, from 10am
Cost: £15 (including coffee, lunch, tea and wine); £10 for students and unwaged. Please register by contacting GCMS@reading.ac.uk.

Programme

10.00 registration and welcome

10.15-11.15 – Session 1:

Lindy Grant (Reading); ‘Reading Abbey in a cultural and intellectual, international context’.

Tessa Webber (Cambridge); ‘Reading in the Refectory at Reading Abbey’.

11.15-11.45 – coffee

11.45-13.15 – Session 2:

Michael Gullick (independent scholar); ‘Reflections on the Reading Abbey Romanesque Book

Collections and Documents’.

Laura Cleaver (Dublin); ‘History Books at Reading and Bec’.

Anne Lawrence (Reading); ‘The Reading Abbey computus manuscript and its context’.

13.15-14.30 – lunch

14.30-15.30 – Session 3:

Nigel Morgan (Cambridge); ‘The Calendar and Litany of Reading Abbey’.

Cyndy Johnston (London); ‘“In the custom of this country”: The Transmigration of Bolognese

Decorative Style in Thirteenth-Century Oxford and Reading Abbey Manuscripts’.

15.30-16.00 – tea

16.00-17.00 – Session 4:

Catherine Leglu (Reading); ‘An Anglo-Norman translation of the Bible at Reading Abbey: London BL Royal 1 C III’.

Brian Kemp (Reading); ‘The Reading Abbey Formulary’.

17.00 – closing remarks and update on the Reading Abbey ruins; followed by wine reception.