Tag Archives: CFP

CFP: Enclosures: Women’s Religious Art and the Boundaries of Method (International Medieval Congress, Leeds 2020, September 10, 2019)

This panel seeks to explore new methodologies for studying the art of women’s religious communities in global and cross-cultural perspective from about 500 to 1525 CE. 

In the last few decades years, art historians have put women back on the map of European medieval art history. Harnessing the second-wave feminism, scholars, such as Caroline Walker Bynum and Madeline H. Caviness, paved the way for this radical shift. The generation that followed, most influentially Jeffrey Hamburger, has consolidated the study of the art and architecture of female monasticism, as manifested in the landmark exhibition of Crown and Veil (Essen and Bonn, 2005). In the process, art historians expanded our knowledge of the role of religious women as makers, commissioners, and recipients of art. The corpus of works of art has exponentially enlarged, fully encompassing the range of media engaged in women’s religious life, including objects previously relegated to margins of art history as crafts. To do so, art historians have employed a variety of methodologies, using interdisciplinary approaches. 

Now, it is time to refresh the methodological foundations and broaden the scope of inquiry of this field. To this end, we invite speakers working on topics of the art of religious women and communities in any cultural, religious, and geographic context. In particular, we encourage the submission of papers that examines the methodological challenges and/or engage in innovative approaches in the field. 

Potential questions may include, but are not limited to: 

  • New insights into the role women’s religious communities played in the production and commission of art.
  • Is the art of female monasticism a productive category of inquiry? If so, what can we learn from examining medieval art through this lens and what are its boundaries? If not, what are the other venues for studying the art of religious women?
  • What new venues do interdisciplinary collaborations open up for the study of female monastic art?
  • Do we need to reassess gender-specific approaches to the art of women’s religious communities in light of recent scholarship on gender?
  • What lessons might be learned from examining other cultural and religious traditions? What methods have proven productive in examining non-Christian/non-Western cultural and religious communities?
  • Case studies of inter-religious and/or inter-cultural exchange, interchange, influences, and entanglement among women’s religious communities
  • Are there media specific to or preferred by female audience? Are there any of these universal?
  • New technological/digital approaches to studying the art of women’s religious communities 

The session seeks to provide a forum for scholars at different career stages, across different art historical geographies. This session, we hope, will foster a dialogue across regions and religions of women’s religious communities, providing a fertile ground for discussion 

We invite interested applicants to submit a 250 word abstract and a short c.v. to Kristina Potuckova (kristina.potuckova@yale.edu) and Orsolya Mednyánszky (omednyanszky@jhu.edu) by September 10, 2019. 

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CFP: Prologues in Learned Texts of Medieval Magic, Research Group on Manuscript Evidence (Kalamazoo 2020, Deadline 15th September 2019)

1.  Prologues in Learned Texts of Medieval Magic

Deadline for abstracts: 15 Sept 2019

Although the prologues of learned books of magic could take many forms, nearly all share at least one common characteristic: the claim to transmit a secret and pristine branch of knowledge. Such claims are frequently couched in the form of a narrative describing how this secret knowledge was originally revealed. Many employ the same actors (Hermes Trismegistus, King Solomon, Aristotle), the same objects (a tablet or disk made of precious material and inscribed with divine wisdom), and the same locations (a hidden cavern or lost pagan temple). These narratives helped to establish the authority of their texts, broadcast their affiliation with specific discourses, and signal how they should be read. Moreover, the prologues served to highlight the erudition of their authors through the use of classical and biblical references and often sophisticated word-play.

The aim of this session is to explore these still largely understudied prologues which testify to the variety of medieval approaches to “magic”. What do these prologues have to tell us about the institutional, cultural, and political milieux in which they were produced? How do certain recurring mythemes found in these prologues stand in relation to the various magical and divinatory arts, specifically those classified as natural or demonic? And to which philosophical, mystical, or religious beliefs do they appeal in order to justify the magical practices that they introduce?

Other potential topics relating to magical prologues include, but are not limited to

— the rhetoric of authority and the relation between power and secret knowledge

— the intersection of diverse intellectual traditions

— the continuity and reception of the Classical Tradition

— the appropriation of Jewish and Arabic traditions

— the relation between the tropes and mythemes found in magical prologues and those in other literary genres, such as prophecies and romances

— the assimilation of philosophical and medical texts

— the use of the Bible and biblical traditions

— philological and text-critical studies of magical prologues.

Please send your proposals to vajra.regan@mail.utoronto.ca by 15 September 2019.

More information here: http://manuscriptevidence.org/wpme/2020-international-congress-on-medieval-studies-call-for-papers/

Contact: Vajra Regan: vajra.regan@mail.utoronto.ca

CFP: ‘Cave Architecture and Art in the Middle Ages’ at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, May 7-10 2020 

55th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University Kalamazoo, May 7-10 2020 

Cave churches, monasteries and dwellings can be admired throughout the Mediterranean, where they often appear next to and even intertwined with the built environment. And yet, with the exception of southern Italy and Cappadocia, they are rarely included in studies of the art and architecture in the Mediterranean (broadly understood). This session seeks to explore the role of cave architecture and art in the urban topography of Eurasia and Africa. 

With the exception of Ethiopia and Cappadocia, caves structures are often dismissed because of their small size and simplicity. However, caves and other underground spaces played essential roles in medieval cultures, as demonstrated by their mural decorations and how they appear in hagiographies, pilgrimage accounts and other genres of literature. We are looking for multi-disciplinary papers that argue for the integration of cave architectures within our understanding of the broader Mediterranean during the medieval period. Papers from all disciplines are encouraged. 

Please send paper proposals of 300 words to the session organsier, Maria Harvey (mariajlharvey@gmail.com), by 15 September 2019, together with a short C.V. and a completed Participant Information form. 

Please include your name, title, and affiliation on the abstract. 

All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to Congress administrators for consideration in general sessions, as per Congress regulations. 

CFP: BAA Post-Graduate Conference, Saturday 23rd November 2019 (Deadline: 6th May 2019)

The BAA invites proposals by postgraduates and early career researchers in the field of medieval history of art, architecture, and archaeology.

Papers can be on any aspect of the medieval period, from antiquity to the later Middle Ages, across all geographical regions.

The BAA postgraduate conference offers an opportunity for postgraduate students and early career researchers at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and discuss their research, and exchange ideas.

Proposals of around 250 words for a 20-minute paper, along with a CV, should be sent by 6th May 2019 to postgradconf@thebaa.org

 

BAA call for papers

CFP: St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference (6-8 June, 2019)

St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference

6 – 8 June, 2019

Deadline: 31 March, 2019

K104208

The British Library, Egerton 2899, Psalter of the Gallican Version, Scotland, 15th century, f. 30, detail.

We are announcing a call for papers for the second St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) Graduate Conference. This three-day conference is aimed at graduate students and early career researchers in any area of Medieval Studies. The second day of the conference will be devoted to the theme Politics and Political Thought and we would particularly welcome abstracts related to this topic from scholars working in any of the fields mentioned below. We aim to encompass a range of historical perspectives, from art to archeology, law to literature.

The keynote addresses will be delivered by Professor Carole Hillenbrand (Edinburg & St Andrews) and Dr Charles West (Sheffield).

Proposals relating to the following fields of research are especially welcome:

  • Eastern Mediterranean studies
  • Art and architecture
  • The church and religious life
  • Crusading
  • Late Antiquity
  • Latin poetry
  • Law
  • Middle Eastern studies
  • Philosophy
  • Rulership and lordship
  • Scottish history
  • Texts and manuscripts

It is anticipated that there shall be no registration free and that some travel bursaries will be available. Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length.

Please email 250-word abstracts to saimsgraduateconference@gmail.com by 31st March 2019.

Workshop: Manipulating the Sun (Wuppertal, 21-23 Aug 19)

Manipulating the Sun: Picturing Astronomical Miracles from the Bible in the Early Modern Era

Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies

August 21 – 23, 2019

Deadline: Mar 17, 2019

Royal 20 B.XX, f.3

The British Library, Royal 20 B XX, f. 3,  c. 1420, “Astronomy and Geometry”

The workshop is being organized by the research project Iconography of the Imagery on Early Modern Scientific Instruments (funded by the German Research Foundation, DFG).

One of the aspects being analysed in the project is biblical imagery that could be related to astronomy. Of particular interest is imagery that was used to argue against the Copernican system from the mid-16th century such as the miracles of the Sun reversing its course in II Kings 20:8-11/Isaiah 38:8 (Horologium Ahas) and the Sun standing still in Joshua 10:12.

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CFP: Revolution and Revolutions in Art (Ljubljana, 12-14 Sep 19)

5th International Conference for PhD Students and Recent PhD Graduates: “Revolution and Revolutions in Art”

Deadline: Apr 15, 2019

The University of Ljubljana, The Center for Iconographic Studies, The University of Belgrade, and The University of Split, introduce their 5th International Conference for PhD students and Recent PhD graduates, Revolution and Revolutions in Art. Challenging PhD students, young researchers and scholars from different fields of humanities and social sciences, the conference seeks to address a multitude of questions, dilemmas, perspectives and problems related to the idea of revolution in art. We welcome theoretical, empirical and methodological papers addressing the theme. We also encourage different aspects and approaches and especially invite submissions that address the following topics:

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