Tag Archives: iberia

CFP: Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28–29 May 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline – Friday 10 January 2020

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Travelling Objects, Travelling People aims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France and the Low Countries, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference will reconsider the dynamics of artistic influence in late medieval Iberia, and place European exchanges in a global context, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, it seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and issues of migration and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.

The theme of ‘travellers’—artists who reached or departed the region, at times more than once in their lives, but also objects and concepts imported and exported—will expand and inflect traditional narratives of late medieval and Renaissance art, underscoring the complexity of global interactions and exchanges which connected the Iberian peninsula to Europe and beyond. Bringing together international scholars working on Iberia and a range of related geographies, the conference seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to expand the field of analysis beyond Europe to encompass relationships with newly acquired dominions, from Madeira to Santo Domingo.

Topics for papers may include, but are not limited to:

  • Iberian artists employed abroad, from the master mason Guillelm Sagrera in Naples, to the sculptor Juan de la Huerta at the Chartreuse de Champmol
  • The close imitation of northern artists in such works as the Portuguese copies of Quentin Metsys’s The Angel Appearing to Saints Clara, Colette and Agnes (early 16th century, Museu de Setúbal / Convento de Jesus, Portugal)
  • ‘Iberian’ objects produced elsewhere, for example Christian ivory carvings made in Goa or Kongo, Afro-Portuguese spoons, and Mexican ‘feather-work’ adopting the vocabulary of northern European late Gothic painting
  • Works made for a non-Iberian audience but purchased and displayed by local patrons.

By encouraging conversations across such seemingly disparate topics and geographies, the conference aims to position the Iberian artistic landscape within the networks of artistic exchange that spanned the medieval and Renaissance worlds, challenging the significance of 1492 as a moment of rupture between the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods.

Proposals are welcome from postgraduate, early-career and established researchers working in all relevant disciplines. Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words together with a short CV and 100-word biography to Costanza.Beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and Sylvia.Alvares-Correa@history.ox.ac.uk by Friday 10 January 2020.

Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Successful candidates will be notified by 17 February. In the first instance, applicants are encouraged to apply to their home institution for travel and accommodation funding. The organisers hope to provide financial support for travel and accommodation to speakers who require it. This conference is made possible by the kind generosity of Sam Fogg.

Please click here for more information.

Conference: Gotik global – kolonial – postkolonial, Dresden, October 26–7, 2018

prac3a7a_da_se_03Dresden, Technische Universität, Institut für Kunst und Musikwissenschaft, Raum ABS/E08/H, 26. – 27.10.2018

Gotik global – kolonial – postkolonial: Gotisierende Sakralarchitektur auf der Iberischen Halbinsel und in Lateinamerika vom 19. bis zum 21. Jahrhundert

Tagung der Technischen Universität Dresden, Institut für Kunst- und Musikwissenschaft der Philosophischen Fakultät in Zusammenarbeit mit der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V.

Immer wieder werden im iberischen und iberoamerikanischen Raum – wie weltweit –  auch heute noch gotisierende Kirchen errichtet. Einige sind typisch für die Neugotik, andere, wie die Almudena-Kathedrale in Madrid oder diejenige von Vitoria-Gasteiz, scheinen als verspätete Bauten des 20. Jahrhundert aus europäischer Sicht aus der Zeit gefallen zu sein. Doch wird gerade in Lateinamerika bis heute an zahlreichen solcher Projekte weitergebaut.
So scheint es zunächst sinnvoll zu überprüfen, ob die stillschweigende Annahme, „die Gotik“ sei eine abgeschlossene Stilepoche, aus globaler Perspektive überhaupt stimmt. Wie ging die zweifellos zunächst kolonial begründete Gotik-Ausbreitung in den überseeischen Gebieten der ehemals spanischen und portugiesischen Weltreiche in eine eigene postkoloniale Adaption über, welche Gründe gab es hierfür und welche stilistischen Ausprägungen wurden und werden gefunden? Wie begann die Entwicklung in den „Mutterländern“? Ist sie dort und in den ehemaligen Kolonien ähnlich oder unterschiedlich verlaufen, gibt es fortdauernde Verbindungen? Lassen sich Parallelen in anderen Weltregionen beobachten? Sind die Phänomene alleine auf die Gotik beschränkt oder gibt es Parallelen für andere Stile?
Im Workshop der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V. soll diese Problematik stichprobenartig untersucht werden. Denn ein systematischer Gesamtüberblick ist zur Zeit kaum möglich, sind doch nicht einmal die potenziell wichtigsten Bauten bekannt.

PROGRAMM:
FREITAG, DEN 26.10.2018

Eröffnung / Begrüßung / Einführung
9.30 Uhr
Grußworte
Prof. Dr. Antonio Hurtado (Dresden), Prorektor der TU Dresden
Prof. Dr. Lutz Hagen (Dresden), Dekan der Philosophischen Fakultät
Prof. Dr. Margit Kern (Hamburg), Vorstand der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V.

10.00 Uhr
Bruno Klein (Dresden): Gotische Architektur des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts –
global – kolonial − postkolonial

10.45 Uhr
Pablo de la Riestra (Nürnberg/Buenos Aires): Einmal Gotik – immer Gotik

11.30 Uhr Pause

Von der Neugotik zur Moderne:
Kastilische und katalanische Beispiele
12.00 Uhr
Henrik Karge (Dresden):
Vicente Lampérez y Romea – Gotik als Idealbild und historisches Phänomen

12.45 Uhr
Judith Urbano (Barcelona): La finalización de la Catedral de Barcelona y otros proyectos neogóticos de Augusto Font y Carreras

13.30 Uhr Pause

15.30
Joan Molet Petit (Barcelona):
Las interpretaciones del gótico en la obra del arquitecto Josep Vilaseca, entre lo arqueologista y lo victoriano

16.15 Uhr
Sergio Fuentes Mila (Barcelona): Revisitar el gótico en la arquitectura civil barcelonesa de finales del siglo XIX. El caso del arquitecto José Doménech y Estapá (1858-1917)

17.00 Uhr
Bettina Marten (Bonn/Dresden): Considerations on the Almudena-Cathedral at Madrid

18.00 Mitgliederversammlung der CJV

20.00 Uhr
Gemeinsames Abendessen

SAMSTAG,  DEN 27.10.2018

Die „moderne“ Neugotik in Lateinamerika
10.00 Uhr
Bruno Klein: Einführung

10.15 Uhr
Martín Checa Artasu (Mexiko-Stadt/Barcelona):
The religious orders as diffusers of the neo-gothic architecture in Latin America

11.00 Uhr
María Aranda Alonso (Madrid/Dresden):
El templo de la Merced de San José de Costa Rica : Punto de partida para estudiar el neogótico en Centroamérica

11.45 Uhr
Paula Vermeersch (São Paulo):
O processo construtivo da Catedral da Sé, São Paulo, 1911-1954

12.30 Uhr
Barbara Borngässer (Dresden):
Neugotik und Moderne im Süden Brasiliens: Die Kirchenbauten Gottfried Böhms

13.15 Uhr
Abschlussdiskussion

16.00 Uhr
Besichtigung aktueller „gotischer“ Architektur in Dresden (Schlosskapelle,  Sophienkirchen-Monument)

Kontakt:
bruno.klein@tu-dresden.de
barbara.borngaesser@online.de
bettina.marten1@tu-dresden.de

CFP: The Saint Enshrined: European Tabernacle-altarpieces, c.1150-1400, Valladolid, June 7–8, 2019

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 Tabernacle-shrine from Mule,
Iceland, now in the Nationalmuseet
in Conpenhagen; c.1250.
Photo: Justin Kroesen

Almost every Medieval church had one or more sculptures of saints, many of which were placed on altars, in wall niches or in so-called tabernacle-altarpieces. This last category refers to three-dimensional, canopied structures, embellished with bright colours and equipped with movable wings that housed cult images of the Virgin and Child or saints. This early type of altarpiece became widespread in Europe between c.1150 and 1400. Nowadays, examples are scarce and often fragmented, overpainted and reconstructed. Most of them come from the geographical periphery of Europe and almost all of them are now without their original context, as they hang on museum walls or in churches as isolated relics.

The purpose of this international symposium is to explore and discuss early tabernacle-altarpieces in different regions of Europe: their provenance, patronage, function, and role in popular piety. We invite speakers to submit proposals for 15-minute papers to be presented during the symposium. Proposals should go beyond case studies and look at such topics as the use and re-use of tabernacle-altarpieces, media involved in their creation, regional differences, etc.

How to Submit: Proposals of c.300 words should be submitted to Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, fbanos@fyl.uva.es.

Deadline: Friday 18th of January 2019.

All proposals will be examined by the Scientific Committee. It is hoped that an edited volume of the symposium proceedings will be published. Successful candidates will be offered free registration.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños, Universidad de Valladolid; Justin Kroesen, Universitetsmuseet i Bergen; Elisabeth Andersen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: These will include members of the Scientific Committee; Stephan Kemperdick, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie; Teresa Laguna Paúl, Universidad de Sevilla; Cristiana Pasqualetti, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila; and Alberto Velasco Gonzàlez, Museu de Lleida: diocesà i comarcal.

PROGRAM (PROVISIONAL): Friday 7th  of June, session held in the Universidad de Valladolid (Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Sala de Juntas); Saturday 8th  of June, field trip to sites in the Diocese of Vitoria.

Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018

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Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS, London: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018
All lectures begin at 7.00 p.m. in the Khalili Lecture Theatre (Main School Lecture Theatre) –  unless indicated otherwise – Philips Building, SOAS, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

 

  • 11 October 2017: The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings,’ Dr Tom Nickson, Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
  • 15 November 2017: Reviving Islamic Architecture in Khedivial Cairo, and Beyond: a Collector’s Passion, Dr Mercedes Volait, CRNS Research Professor at INHA, Paris
  • 6 December 2017: Takht-e Soleyman/Iran – From Sasanian Fire Temple to Ilkhanid Summer Palace. New Evidence from Old Excavations, Dr Ute Franke,                                       Deputy Director, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Berlin
  • 10 January 2018: The Hadassah and Daniel Khalili Memorial Lecture in Islamic Art and Culture: The Calligrapher, the Painter, and the Patron: A New Perspective on the Freer Khusraw u Shirin, Dr Simon Rettig, Assistant Curator of Islamic Art, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • 21 February 2018: In the service of religion? The display of ‘science from the Islamic world’ in the museum, Dr Silke Ackermann, Director, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford
  • 14 March 2018: The Seventh Bahari Foundation Lecture in Iranian Art and Culture: Decagonal and Quasicrystalline Geometry in the Architecture of Medieval Persia and Its Influence in the Greater Islamic World, Dr Peter J. Lu, Department of Physics and SEAS, Harvard University, USA
  • 25 April 2018: Islamic Textiles from Iberia: Re-evaluating Their Role in the Mediterranean Context, Dr Ana Cabrera-Lafuente, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  • 9 May 2018: Ilse Sturkenboom
  • 13 June 2018: Ahmet Ersoy

For further information please contact Rosalind Wade Haddon: 07714087480 or                 rosalindhaddon@gmail.com

 

 

 

The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange (Princeton, 19-20 May 17)

Louis A. Simpson International Building, Room 399, Princeton USA, May
19 – 20, 2017
<https://ica.princeton.edu/conferences/>

The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian
Interchange

In collaboration with the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones
Científicas in Madrid and Princeton’s departments of Art & Archaeology
and History, the Index of Christian Art will sponsor a two-day
interdisciplinary conference.

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Workshop: Arts and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650)

horizontalWorkshop: Arts and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650), Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University (RCC Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St., Cambridge MA), April 28, 2017

Visual strategies of legitimization became increasingly important for
Iberian monarchies during the late medieval and early modern periods.
Mediterranean dynastic, diplomatic, and military endeavors called for
effective propaganda, both in the metropolis and in viceregal
territories, such as southern Italy. Such efforts include architecture,
both ephemeral and permanent, the decoration of palaces, court
portraiture, and historiography. The advent of a Monarchia Hispanica
under Habsburg rule required careful elaborations of national,
religious, racial, and gender identities, across a mosaic of
multilingual and multiethnic populations. This workshop aims to
highlight some of these strategies, and to create a forum for
discussion of further research avenues, under the guidance of scholars
from Spanish and American universities. It is made possible thanks to
the collaboration of the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard
University, and the University of Valencia, with additional support
from the Fulbright Commission and the BBVA Foundation.

09.00
Registration

09.15
Welcome & opening remarks

09.30
Viceregal Palaces in the Dominions of the Crown of Aragon: Charting a
Mediterranean Architecture
Prof. Mercedes Gómez-Ferrer (Universitat de València)

10.45
Icons of Dynastic Authority. Sofonisba Anguissola at Her Majesty’s
Service
Prof. Jorge Sebastián (Universitat de València)

12.00
Lunch

13.30
Facing the Infidel Other: Visual Battle Narratives and Royal Entries by
Spanish Habsburg Monarchs
Dr. Borja Franco (UNED, Madrid)

14.45
The Triumph of Tunis in Viceregal Palermo, Messina, and Naples
Prof. Cristelle Baskins (Tufts University)

16.00
Final remarks and roundtable discussion
with Prof. Felipe Pereda (Harvard University).

17.00
End of workshop

Each lecture to be followed by Q & A