Tag Archives: Middle Ages

Call for Papers: Negotiation the Past. Islamic Heritage in Italy and Spain – Venice 1-2/02/2019 (Deadline 30/04/2018)

9200000033698488.jpgThe conference will focus on the discussion about the Islamic heritage in Italy and Spain and its later reception in the post-Islamic context. Sharing an Islamic past, both countries display this heritage in different ways through art and architecture. As cultural contact zones, Italy and Spain had a rich Islamic tradition, which has been adopted in the medieval Norman and Mudéjar artistic production.

These exchange processes are currently subject to ongoing international discussions. Furthermore, the observed medieval transfer mechanisms may be applied to the modern reception of the Italian and Spanish Islamic heritage. Which differences may be detected between the medieval edifices of Palermo or Seville and the neo-Islamic interiors in Sammezzano or Aranjuez? Has the reception behaviour of the 19th and 20th centuries changed compared to that of the Middle Age? How have the Islamic standards been assumed in the modern architectural vocabulary? Who were the possible promotors of this pro-Islamic art trend? What part did the medieval clients and their architects play? How relevant are the travellers, private collectors, arabists or art historians of the 19th century for the valorisation of the Islamic heritage? What was the role of Islamic heritage for the construction of identity and ideologies in both countries?

The current contributions shall be presented in four sections with the following thematic focus:

– Islamic heritage in Italy and Spain
– Cross-cultural exchange in the Middle Age
– Re-appropriating the Islamic past in 19th and 20th centuries art and architecture
– Ideologies and identity building

Papers will have a duration of 20 min. Conference languages will be English, Italian and Spanish. Abstracts of no more than 300 words, together with a short CV, should be sent until 30 April 2018 to: conference@transculturalstudies.ch

Organizers: Prof. Dr. Guido Zucconi (IUAV) / Prof. Dr. Francine Giese (UZH) / Prof. Dr. Juan Calatrava (UGR) / Dr. Ariane Varela Braga (UZH)

Keynotes: Antonio Almagro Gorbea (Escuela de Estudios Árabes CSIC) / Ezio Godoli (UniFl)

Università Iuav di Venezia, 1-2 February 2019
Deadline: Apr 30, 2018

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23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2018

23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2018

Free, booking required

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy – or disappearance – in the present.

Existing approaches to the subject help to understand the formation, dispersal, and reassembly of groupings of objects. However, broadening the scope of what a medieval collection is can open new paths of exploration. From immense palace networks to single-volume manuscripts, a wide range of objects can pose complex and exciting questions regarding how physical and conceptual similarity and proximity shaped making and meaning in the Middle Ages.

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers the opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present and promote their research.

Organised by Costanza Beltrami (The Courtauld Institute of Art / The Auckland Project) and Maggie Crosland (The Courtauld Institute of Art) with the generous support of The Sackler Research Forum.

Programme

09.30 – 10.00:  Registration

10.00 – 10.10:  Welcome

Session 1: Assembled Objects — chaired by Teresa Lane

10.10 – 10.30: Gesner Las Casas Brito Filho (University of Leeds): Níðwundor’, terrible wonder: The Beowulf Manuscript as a compilation about the ‘East’ (Nowell Codex part in British Library Cotton Vitellius A.xv)

10.50 – 11.10: Krisztina Ilko (University of Cambridge): Collecting Miracles: Visualising the Early Saints’ Cult of the Augustinian Friars

11.10 – 11.30: Elizabeth Mattison (University of Toronto/ KIK-IRPA): The Collection as History: Collecting with and on the Reliquary Bust of Saint Lambert in Liège

11.10 – 11.30: Discussion

11:30 – 12:00: TEA / COFFEE BREAK – Seminar Rooms 1 & 2

Session 2: Strategies of Collecting — chaired by Charlotte Wytema 

12.00 – 12.20: Noah Smith (University of Kent): The Courtrai Chest: A Matter of Personal Collection

12.20 – 12.40: Oliver Mitchell (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Collecting relics, curating an image: regicide, martyrdom, and the sacrificial kingship of Louis IX in the Sainte Chapelle

12.40 – 13.00: Maria Lopez-Monis (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Collecting the profane: Conversion of earthly objects into reliquaries

13.00 – 13.20: Discussion

13.20 – 14.30: LUNCH (provided for speakers only in Seminar Room 1)

Session 3: Collaborating across media — chaired by Nicholas Flory

14.30 – 14.50: Maria Harvey (University of Cambridge): Across time and space: Byzantin(ising) objects in the hands of the Del Balzo Orsini

14.50 – 15.10: Sophia Ong (Rutgers University/INHA): Autres petiz Joyaulx et Reliquiaires pendans: Pendants and the Collecting of Jewelry in the Valois Courts

15.10 – 15.30: Adriana Concin (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Collecting medieval likenesses: Archduke Ferdinand II and his Genealogy of Tyrolian Landesfürsten

15.30 – 15.50: Discussion

15.50 – 16.20: TEA / COFFEE BREAK – Seminar Rooms 1 & 2

Session 4: Spaces of Display — chaired by Harry Prance

16.20 – 16.40: Lesley Milner (The Courtauld Institute of Art): From Medieval treasure room to Renaissance wunderkammer: Sir William Sharrington’s strong room at Lacock Abbey

16.40 – 17.00: Sarah Randeraad (University of Amsterdam): Medii Aevii, Medio Evo, Tempi di Mezzo: ‘Amorphous’ Middle Ages in 19th century Florentine private and public display

17.00 – 17.30: Discussion

17.30 – 17.45: Closing remarks: Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

17.45: RECEPTION (Front Hall)

With special thanks to Michael Carter for his contribution and support for the colloquium.

CFP: Misericordia International Colloquium 2018: Choir Stalls & Their Patrons, Rijeka (Croatia), 13-16 September 2018

cdi16-32-15Call for Papers: Misericordia International Colloquium 2018: Choir Stalls & Their Patrons, Rijeka (Croatia), 13-16 September 2018
Deadline: Feb 15, 2018
Notification of  paper acceptance: March 15, 2018

Misericordia International is an internationally active multidisciplinary network dedicated to the study of choir stalls and their relation to other artistic manifestations during the Middle Ages and to the dissemination of results. The intensive exchange with researchers from neighboring disciplines reveals interfaces between disciplines and subjects of research and provides new impulses for the study of choir stalls. The platform for scholarly exchange is the international conference organized  every two years.

The next colloquium will be held in Rijeka (Croatia) in September 2018. The conference seeks to explore and discuss the relation between choir stalls and their patrons. It aims to present original research in this field as well as to establish productive dialogue between scholars with a particular research interest in choir stalls. Artworks and their patrons have raised and continue to raise many research questions. While choir stalls have been studied extensively for the misericords with profane carvings, less research has been done on the commissions for this type of church furniture. In recent years the focus of choir stall research has moved toward makers and patrons, hence  the previous colloquium’s topic was dedicated to the craftsmen and their workshops. The 2018 conference will focus on problems of ecclesiastical and secular patrons and questions such as who were the patrons of choir stalls and to what extent were they responsible for the final result, or are there differences or similarities between choir stalls considering different patrons – members of chapters, parishes, female and male monastic communities, confraternities and private persons.

We welcome academic papers that will approach this subject in an interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse way.

Acceptable topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:
– collaboration between patrons and craftsmen (carpenters, sculptors and painters)
– results of the archival research;
– inscriptions and used typography on choir stalls;
– migrations of craftsmen and migrations of stylistic features;
– center versus periphery;
– depiction of patrons on choir stalls.

Following the conference, a two-day excursion – visit to selected choir stalls of the region – is planned.
The conference language is English. A publication of the proceedings of this conference is forseen.
Papers should not exceed anticipated maximum time of 20 minutes and will be followed by a 10-minute discussion.

A paper proposal should contain the title and abstract (500 words maximum). Each proposal should be accompanied by full contact information (home and office mailing addresses, e-mail address, and phone number) and a short CV.

Paper proposals should be submitted electronically to: choir_stalls2018@uniri.hr

There is NO registration fee. Administration and organizational costs, working materials, lunch and
coffee breaks during conference are covered by the organizers. Travel expenses and accomodation ARE NOT COVERED.

Conference: Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean, Granada, 13-14 November 2017

p05d1gkgConference: Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean, Palacio de Carlos V – Alhambra, Granada, 13-14 November 2017
Registration deadline: Nov 8, 2017

Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean: between East and West
2nd International Workshop of the ArtMedGIS Project

Free registration open until 8th November 2017 at: mmcobaleda@ugr.es; mmcobaleda@fcsh.unl.pt; iem.geral@fcsh.unl.pt

The aim of this International Workshop is to establish an exchange opportunity to analyse the cultural legacy of the Western Islamic societies from different and complementary perspectives.
To achieve this aim, a double objective has been proposed: to create a space for dialogue in order to share recent research results, as well as to establish new research networks integrated by experienced and young researchers thus allowing for the development of interdisciplinary research lines on the late Middle Ages.
Within this general framework, the main goal will be to analyse the Islamic cultural legacy in a comprehensive approach, from the multidisciplinary fields of History of Art, Architecture, History, Archaeology, Philosophy, Music and History of Religions.

PROGRAMME

Monday, 13th November 2017

9:45 Registration

10:00 Opening Session

10:15 Lecture
La Alhambra en el contexto del arte islámico
Juan Carlos RUIZ SOUZA (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

Session 1: The Western Islamic Legacy

11:15
El legado Omeya: Córdoba y el Imperio Almohade
Rafael BLANCO GUZMÁN (LAAC-EEA-CSIC – Universidad de Córdoba)

11:45 Coffee break

12:15
El viaje de la Sebka almohade a través del Mediterráneo Medieval
Dolores VILLALBA SOLA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

12:45
La culture matérielle des élites mérinides : vêtements et regalia comme emblèmes politiques (XIIIe-XVe s.)
Yassir BENHIMA (Université Paris III – Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris)

13:15
Aportaciones desde el Reino Nazarí de Granada a la configuración de la cuentística mediterránea del s. XV
Desirée LÓPEZ BERNAL (UGR, Granada)

13:45 Lunch

17:00 Lecture
La Zoraya como mecenas: el programa ornamental del palacio de “Daralhorra”. Nuevas propuestas
Cynthia ROBINSON (Cornell University)

18:00 Coffee break

18:15
Los bienes habices en la Granada del siglo XVI: pervivencia de una institución islámica en el Occidente cristiano
Ana María CARBALLEIRA DEBASA  (EEA – CSIC, Granada)

Session 2: The Arts between East and West

18:45
Arte y ciencia en al-Andalus y el Mediterráneo bajomedieval: astrolabios almohades, nazaríes y ayyubíes en contexto
Azucena HERNÁNDEZ (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

19:15
Modelos orientales en la producción textil andalusí
Laura RODRÍGUEZ PEINADO (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

Tuesday, 14th November 2017

10:00 Lecture
Los ‘best-sellers’ de al-Andalus: recepción y valoración en el pasado y el presente
Maribel FIERRO (CCHS – CSIC, Madrid)

11:00
Spolia y revivals clásicos en los discursos de legitimidad: de Córdoba a las mezquitas mamelucas de El Cairo
Susana CALVO CAPILLA (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

11:30
Eboraria sículo-normanda, andalusí y fatimí: transferencias iconográficas y propaganda visual
Noelia SILVA SANTA-CRUZ (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

12:00 Coffee break

Session 3: Jews, Muslims and Christians: Three Religions and One Culture

12:30
Hacia una lectura global de los fenómenos epigráficos mediterráneos al final     de la Edad Media
Vincent DEBIAIS (CESCM – CNRS, Poitiers)
Morgan UBERTI (Université Bordeaux Montaigne)

13:00
Rex Tyrannus or a self-aware Monarch? The fatimids influences on Roger II’s culture of power
Francesco Paolo TOCCO (University of Messina)

13:30
Dance, Music and Clothes: Distinctive Signs and Intercultural Relationships between East and West in Italian and Spanish Paintings during the first half of the 14th century
Maria PORTMANN (Conservator of the Historic Monuments in the Canton of the Valais, Switzerland)

14:00 Lunch

17:00
The impact of Sufism on Jewish Mysticim and its possible influence on Kabbalah
Dora ZSOM (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)

17:30
Jews and rabbis at the court of Mehmet the Conqueror according to Eliyyahu Capsali’s Seder Eliyyahu Zuta
Francesca Valentina DIANA (University of Bologna)

18:00 Coffee break

18:20 Closing lecture:
Relaciones artísticas entre Oriente y Occidente: el Proyecto ArtMedGIS
María MARCOS COBALEDA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

Scientific direction and coordination:
María MARCOS COBALEDA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

Organization:
ArtMedGIS Project (MSCA – H2020, No 699818)
Instituto de Estudos Medievais (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)
In collaboration with:
Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife
Universidad de Granada (UGR, Granada)

European History 1150-1550 Seminars @ IHR: 2017-2018 Programme

800px-1450_c2bf_carta_catalana_jpeg_copy-aEuropean History 1150-1550
Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR, North block, Senate House
Thursdays 17:30

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL), Marie Legendre (SOAS)

 

Autumn Term 2017

Date Seminar details
5 October

17:30

Pretenders and returners: Dynastic imposters in the Middle Ages

Robert Bartlett (University of St Andrews)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

19 October

17:30

Hunting at the court of King John of England

Hugh Thomas (Miami College of Arts and Sciences)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

2 November

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Daisy Livingston (School of Oriental and African Studies), Martin Hall (Royal Holloway University of London)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

16 November

17:30

Trust and authority: Pragmatic literacy and communication in the royal towns of medieval Hungary

Katalin Szende (Central European University)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

30 November

18:00

The Creighton Lecture 2017. Strangers in Medieval Cities

Miri Rubin (Queen Mary University of London)

IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02, Basement, IHR

14 December

17:30

The rise of administrative lordship in medieval Flanders: New perspectives

Jean-François Nieus (University of Namur)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Spring Term 2018

Date Seminar details
11 January

17:30

Trustworthy men: How inequality and faith made the medieval church

Ian Forrest (University of Oxford)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

25 January

17:30

Government and inquests from Philip Augustus to the last Capetians

Marie Dejoux (Pantheon-Sorbonne University Paris1)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 February

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Anaïs Waag (King’s College London), Cecil Reid (Queen Mary University of London)

Room 243, Second Floor

22 February

17:30

Petrifying wealth: The southern European shift to masonry as collective investment in identity, c. 1050-1300

Ana María Rodríguez López (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 March

17:30

Observing Religion: High medieval religious movements and their polemical vocabularies

Sita Steckel (University of Münster)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Call for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich

csm_05-03_Ptolemaeus_ce38187a3aCall for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich
Deadline: 1 October 2017

The project Ptolemaeus Arabus et Latinus (PAL) is dedicated to the edition and
study of the Arabic and Latin versions of Ptolemy’s astronomical and astrological texts
and related material. These include works by Ptolemy or attributed to him,
commentaries thereupon and other works that are of immediate relevance to
understanding Ptolemy’s heritage in the Middle Ages and the early modern period up
to 1700 A.D.
The project is hosted by the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich for a
period of 25 years from 2013 to 2037. It is supervised by Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus
Hasse (University of Würzburg) and carried out by five scholars, including two
research leaders, Dr. David Juste and Dr. Benno van Dalen, two post-doctoral
researchers and one doctoral student.
We welcome applications for visiting fellowships tenable in Munich for a period of one
to four months between 1 January and 30 November 2018. The next round of visiting
fellowships is planned for 2020.
-The fellowships amount to € 3100 per month for senior scholars (PhD degree
awarded before 1 January 2013), € 2600 per month for post-docs (PhD degree
awarded after 31 December 2012) and € 1300 per month for doctoral students. In
special cases an additional travel grant may be awarded to overseas applicants. The
fellowships are not liable to taxation in Germany and do not include health
insurance or social benefits.
-Fellows will be offered office facilities at the Bayerische Akademie der
Wissenschaften in Munich, together with the research team, and are expected to
work in Munich most of the time. Fellows will be given access to the research
facilities of the project, including the project’s collection of manuscript
reproductions, and to the research libraries in Munich.
-Fellows are expected to do research in an area relevant to the project and to share
their experience and insights with the other members of the research team.
Research proposals to deal with Ptolemaic sources in languages other than Arabic
and Latin (especially Greek, Syriac, Hebrew and Persian) are also welcome.
-Applications should be sent in English to Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus Hasse by email (applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de) before 1 October 2017. Applications should include a complete CV with a list of publications and a research proposal of no more than 500 words. Applicants are asked to state in their research proposal the preferred duration of the fellowship (one, two, three or four months) and to propose a starting date.
Receipt of the application will be acknowledged and the outcome of all applications will be notified by email no later than 31 October 2017.
For further information, please visit our website http://ptolemaeus.badw.de. For
further enquiries, contact Dr. Claudia Dorl at applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de.

CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)