Tag Archives: Middle Ages

Conference: Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean, Granada, 13-14 November 2017

p05d1gkgConference: Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean, Palacio de Carlos V – Alhambra, Granada, 13-14 November 2017
Registration deadline: Nov 8, 2017

Dialogues in Late Medieval Mediterranean: between East and West
2nd International Workshop of the ArtMedGIS Project

Free registration open until 8th November 2017 at: mmcobaleda@ugr.es; mmcobaleda@fcsh.unl.pt; iem.geral@fcsh.unl.pt

The aim of this International Workshop is to establish an exchange opportunity to analyse the cultural legacy of the Western Islamic societies from different and complementary perspectives.
To achieve this aim, a double objective has been proposed: to create a space for dialogue in order to share recent research results, as well as to establish new research networks integrated by experienced and young researchers thus allowing for the development of interdisciplinary research lines on the late Middle Ages.
Within this general framework, the main goal will be to analyse the Islamic cultural legacy in a comprehensive approach, from the multidisciplinary fields of History of Art, Architecture, History, Archaeology, Philosophy, Music and History of Religions.

PROGRAMME

Monday, 13th November 2017

9:45 Registration

10:00 Opening Session

10:15 Lecture
La Alhambra en el contexto del arte islámico
Juan Carlos RUIZ SOUZA (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

Session 1: The Western Islamic Legacy

11:15
El legado Omeya: Córdoba y el Imperio Almohade
Rafael BLANCO GUZMÁN (LAAC-EEA-CSIC – Universidad de Córdoba)

11:45 Coffee break

12:15
El viaje de la Sebka almohade a través del Mediterráneo Medieval
Dolores VILLALBA SOLA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

12:45
La culture matérielle des élites mérinides : vêtements et regalia comme emblèmes politiques (XIIIe-XVe s.)
Yassir BENHIMA (Université Paris III – Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris)

13:15
Aportaciones desde el Reino Nazarí de Granada a la configuración de la cuentística mediterránea del s. XV
Desirée LÓPEZ BERNAL (UGR, Granada)

13:45 Lunch

17:00 Lecture
La Zoraya como mecenas: el programa ornamental del palacio de “Daralhorra”. Nuevas propuestas
Cynthia ROBINSON (Cornell University)

18:00 Coffee break

18:15
Los bienes habices en la Granada del siglo XVI: pervivencia de una institución islámica en el Occidente cristiano
Ana María CARBALLEIRA DEBASA  (EEA – CSIC, Granada)

Session 2: The Arts between East and West

18:45
Arte y ciencia en al-Andalus y el Mediterráneo bajomedieval: astrolabios almohades, nazaríes y ayyubíes en contexto
Azucena HERNÁNDEZ (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

19:15
Modelos orientales en la producción textil andalusí
Laura RODRÍGUEZ PEINADO (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

Tuesday, 14th November 2017

10:00 Lecture
Los ‘best-sellers’ de al-Andalus: recepción y valoración en el pasado y el presente
Maribel FIERRO (CCHS – CSIC, Madrid)

11:00
Spolia y revivals clásicos en los discursos de legitimidad: de Córdoba a las mezquitas mamelucas de El Cairo
Susana CALVO CAPILLA (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

11:30
Eboraria sículo-normanda, andalusí y fatimí: transferencias iconográficas y propaganda visual
Noelia SILVA SANTA-CRUZ (Universidad Complutense, Madrid)

12:00 Coffee break

Session 3: Jews, Muslims and Christians: Three Religions and One Culture

12:30
Hacia una lectura global de los fenómenos epigráficos mediterráneos al final     de la Edad Media
Vincent DEBIAIS (CESCM – CNRS, Poitiers)
Morgan UBERTI (Université Bordeaux Montaigne)

13:00
Rex Tyrannus or a self-aware Monarch? The fatimids influences on Roger II’s culture of power
Francesco Paolo TOCCO (University of Messina)

13:30
Dance, Music and Clothes: Distinctive Signs and Intercultural Relationships between East and West in Italian and Spanish Paintings during the first half of the 14th century
Maria PORTMANN (Conservator of the Historic Monuments in the Canton of the Valais, Switzerland)

14:00 Lunch

17:00
The impact of Sufism on Jewish Mysticim and its possible influence on Kabbalah
Dora ZSOM (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest)

17:30
Jews and rabbis at the court of Mehmet the Conqueror according to Eliyyahu Capsali’s Seder Eliyyahu Zuta
Francesca Valentina DIANA (University of Bologna)

18:00 Coffee break

18:20 Closing lecture:
Relaciones artísticas entre Oriente y Occidente: el Proyecto ArtMedGIS
María MARCOS COBALEDA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

Scientific direction and coordination:
María MARCOS COBALEDA (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)

Organization:
ArtMedGIS Project (MSCA – H2020, No 699818)
Instituto de Estudos Medievais (IEM – FCSH/UNL, Lisbon)
In collaboration with:
Patronato de la Alhambra y Generalife
Universidad de Granada (UGR, Granada)

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European History 1150-1550 Seminars @ IHR: 2017-2018 Programme

800px-1450_c2bf_carta_catalana_jpeg_copy-aEuropean History 1150-1550
Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR, North block, Senate House
Thursdays 17:30

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL), Marie Legendre (SOAS)

 

Autumn Term 2017

Date Seminar details
5 October

17:30

Pretenders and returners: Dynastic imposters in the Middle Ages

Robert Bartlett (University of St Andrews)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

19 October

17:30

Hunting at the court of King John of England

Hugh Thomas (Miami College of Arts and Sciences)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

2 November

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Daisy Livingston (School of Oriental and African Studies), Martin Hall (Royal Holloway University of London)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

16 November

17:30

Trust and authority: Pragmatic literacy and communication in the royal towns of medieval Hungary

Katalin Szende (Central European University)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

30 November

18:00

The Creighton Lecture 2017. Strangers in Medieval Cities

Miri Rubin (Queen Mary University of London)

IHR Wolfson Conference Suite, NB01/NB02, Basement, IHR

14 December

17:30

The rise of administrative lordship in medieval Flanders: New perspectives

Jean-François Nieus (University of Namur)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Spring Term 2018

Date Seminar details
11 January

17:30

Trustworthy men: How inequality and faith made the medieval church

Ian Forrest (University of Oxford)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

25 January

17:30

Government and inquests from Philip Augustus to the last Capetians

Marie Dejoux (Pantheon-Sorbonne University Paris1)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 February

17:30

European History 1150-1550 2 paper event

Anaïs Waag (King’s College London), Cecil Reid (Queen Mary University of London)

Room 243, Second Floor

22 February

17:30

Petrifying wealth: The southern European shift to masonry as collective investment in identity, c. 1050-1300

Ana María Rodríguez López (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

8 March

17:30

Observing Religion: High medieval religious movements and their polemical vocabularies

Sita Steckel (University of Münster)

IHR Wolfson Room NB02, Basement, IHR

Call for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich

csm_05-03_Ptolemaeus_ce38187a3aCall for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich
Deadline: 1 October 2017

The project Ptolemaeus Arabus et Latinus (PAL) is dedicated to the edition and
study of the Arabic and Latin versions of Ptolemy’s astronomical and astrological texts
and related material. These include works by Ptolemy or attributed to him,
commentaries thereupon and other works that are of immediate relevance to
understanding Ptolemy’s heritage in the Middle Ages and the early modern period up
to 1700 A.D.
The project is hosted by the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich for a
period of 25 years from 2013 to 2037. It is supervised by Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus
Hasse (University of Würzburg) and carried out by five scholars, including two
research leaders, Dr. David Juste and Dr. Benno van Dalen, two post-doctoral
researchers and one doctoral student.
We welcome applications for visiting fellowships tenable in Munich for a period of one
to four months between 1 January and 30 November 2018. The next round of visiting
fellowships is planned for 2020.
-The fellowships amount to € 3100 per month for senior scholars (PhD degree
awarded before 1 January 2013), € 2600 per month for post-docs (PhD degree
awarded after 31 December 2012) and € 1300 per month for doctoral students. In
special cases an additional travel grant may be awarded to overseas applicants. The
fellowships are not liable to taxation in Germany and do not include health
insurance or social benefits.
-Fellows will be offered office facilities at the Bayerische Akademie der
Wissenschaften in Munich, together with the research team, and are expected to
work in Munich most of the time. Fellows will be given access to the research
facilities of the project, including the project’s collection of manuscript
reproductions, and to the research libraries in Munich.
-Fellows are expected to do research in an area relevant to the project and to share
their experience and insights with the other members of the research team.
Research proposals to deal with Ptolemaic sources in languages other than Arabic
and Latin (especially Greek, Syriac, Hebrew and Persian) are also welcome.
-Applications should be sent in English to Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus Hasse by email (applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de) before 1 October 2017. Applications should include a complete CV with a list of publications and a research proposal of no more than 500 words. Applicants are asked to state in their research proposal the preferred duration of the fellowship (one, two, three or four months) and to propose a starting date.
Receipt of the application will be acknowledged and the outcome of all applications will be notified by email no later than 31 October 2017.
For further information, please visit our website http://ptolemaeus.badw.de. For
further enquiries, contact Dr. Claudia Dorl at applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de.

CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)

CFP FOR AN EDITED COLLECTION: Architectural Representation in the European Middle Ages

ramsey censerCFP FOR AN EDITED COLLECTION: Architectural Representation in the European Middle Ages, edited by Hannah Bailey, Karl Kinsella, and Daniel Thomas

Deadline: 1 November 2017

The architectural remnants of the Middle Ages—from castles and cathedrals to village churches—provide many people’s first point of contact with the medieval period and its culture. Such concrete survivals provide a direct link to the material experience of medieval people. At the same time, exploring the ways in which architecture was conceptualized and depicted can contribute to our understanding of the ideological and imaginative worldview of the period.

This volume seeks to investigate all aspects of architectural representation in the medieval period, encompassing actual, symbolic, or imaginary architectural features, whether still standing today, observable in the archaeological record, or surviving only through depiction in literature or art. Topics of interest might include (but are not limited to) the social and symbolic value of architecture, architectural metaphor or imagery, architecture in visual representations, architecture in the depiction of other spaces, memory and architecture, and architectural style.

The volume is interdisciplinary in outlook and we welcome contributions from across the spectrum of academic disciplines, including literature, history, art, theology, and archaeology.

Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words, with a brief biographical blurb, to the editors at: architecturalrepresentations@gmail.com by 1st November, 2017.

CfP: Painted on the wall:  the wall as a visual panel in the Middle Ages

The 11th Complutese Congress on Medieval Art aims to think about the visual function of medieval painted walls, taking into account that they were probably the best mass media in their context.

It will pay attention to the following topics: iconography, techniques, forms and expressive resources, socio-cultural context, preservation and the museum exhibition system.

There will be six sessions:

  • Session I: A multidisciplinary approach to medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Fernando Gutiérrez Baños (Univ. Valladolid)
  • Session II: Territory and medieval wall painting: centre and periphery. Invited Conferences of Prof. Jerrilynn Dodds (Sarah Lawrence College) and Dr Carmen Rallo (General Office of Museums of the Nation in Spain)
  • Session III: Function and meaning of the wall painting. Invited Conferences of Prof. Simone Piazza (Univ. Paul Valéry, Montpelier III) and Dr José Miguel Lorenzo Arribas (Scholl of Cultural Heritage in Spain)
  • Session IV: Techniques and colors in the preparations of the wall. Invited Conference of Prof. Rafael Ruiz Alonso (Royal Academy of History and Art of Saint Quirce)
  • Session V: Wall as an occasional support of other artistic techniques. Invited Conference of Prof. Roger Rosewell (Society of Antiquaries of London)
  • Session VI: Heritage: conservation, museums and virtualization of medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Jordi Camps (MNAC)

For more information: https://www.ucm.es/artemedieval/pintadoenlapared

CfP: CITIZEN CATHEDRALS IN THE MIDDLE AGES; Templa Winter School 2017

Please, see the call for papers of the Templa Winter School, “Citizen Cathedrals in the Middle Ages. Image, institutions, networks” (Girona, December 18th-19th 2017), organized by members of our Research Team (V. Debiais, X. Granero, A. Moreno, G. Boto).

It is addressed mainly to young researchers whose studies are focused on medieval Cathedrals related to their cities, and vice versa.

As with the Templa Summer School 2015 and 2016, the Templa Team will cover the expenses of all researchers whose papers have been accepted.