Tag Archives: literature

Conference: The Right Moment. A Symposium on Kairotic Energies, Brussels, 18-19 October 2018

church-of-the-holy-nativity-631The Greek term kairós expresses an idea of ‘grasping the right moment’, which travelled through art, literature, and philosophy. And even today, it is central to debates over, for example, time management. Combining perspectives from classical reception studies and iconology, this ongoing project at KU Leuven (2017-2021) is about the reception of kairós in the visual medium from antiquity to the Renaissance. How was the notion of kairós visualized in images throughout time, from antiquity to the early modern era? And more specifically, how did text and image work together to transform the notion of kairós in various contexts?

The attending speakers from Belgium, Germany, France, Israel, Croatia, The Netherlands, Romania, The United Kingdom, The United States, and Switzerland have not only been selected on the basis of their interdisciplinary skills in the field; but equally because of their distinctive contribution to the method of iconology and visual anthropology.

Many among them are key influencers on, among other things, the importance of the Humanities in terms of peace process work, ecology, and the relationship between Eastern and Western civilizations.

Barbara Baert – Kunstwetenschappen KU Leuven – www.illuminare.be

PROGRAM

Thursday, 18 October

08.30-09.00 Registration

09.00-09.15 Welcome speech by Pierre Van Moerbeke,
Executive director of Francqui Foundation

09.15-09.30 Welcome speech by Luc Sels, Rector of KU
Leuven

09.30-10.00 Introduction by Barbara Baert

10.00-10.30 Coffee break

Part I
10.30-11.30 Giotto, the Eye and the Gaze – Victor Stoichita
Respondent: Herman Parret

11.30-12.30 Time in the Context of Ecclesia/Synagoga – Miri Rubin
Respondent: Inigo Bocken

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part II
14.00-15.00 Epochal Madness: Notes on the Present Moment – W. J. T. Mitchell
Respondent: Stéphane Symons

15.00-16.00 The Manic Moment – Davide Stimilli
Respondent: Hedwig Schwall

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 The Silence of Lifta – Avinoam Shalem
Respondent: Amr Ryad

17.30-18.15 Presentation of the new series Recollection: Experimental Reflections on Texts, Images and Ideas – Veerle De Laet (Leuven University Press) & Ellen Harlizius-Klück

Friday 19 October

08.30-09.00 Welcome & coffee

Part III
09.00-10.00 The Nativity Church in Bethlehem as Kairotic
Space – Bianca Kühnel
Respondent: Marina Vicelja-Matijašic

10.00-11.00 L’occasion de la grâce dans le martyre – Pierre Antoine Fabre
Respondent: Ralph Dekoninck

11.00-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.30 A Dialogue of Early Buddhism, Hinduism and
Jainism on the Varieties of Auspicious Moments – Eugen Ciurtin
Respondent: Reimund Bieringer

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part IV
14.00-15.00 Generating Synchronicity: Bodily and Affective
Techniques – Elisabeth Hsu
Respondent: Philippe Van Cauteren

15.00-16.00 The Moment of the Dangerous Women – Catherine Harper
Respondent: Ann-Sophie Lehmann

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 Concluding remarks – Han Lamers & Bart Verschaffel

17.30-18.00 Book presentations: Paul Peeters (Peeters Publishers) & Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art

18.00-19.30 Farewell drinks

Contact and registration: stephanie.heremans@kuleuven.be
Registration deadline: 30 September 2018

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CfP: Memory and Lineage in Medieval Romance, Leeds IMC 2018

The 25th Leeds International Medieval Congress has a special thematic strand of ‘memory’. Medieval romance lends itself to thinking about memory, in many ways, and not least because of its preoccupation with lineage. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on any aspect of memory and/or lineage in medieval romance. The brief is deliberately broad, so please feel free to interpret according to your interest. Some thematic and theoretical approaches to consider may be: 

– inheritance / heritage / legacy

– remembering and recognition

– family histories and family politics

– textual lineage.

Please email proposals (250 words max.) to Kirsty Bolton (University of Southampton) and Grace Timperley (University of Manchester) at lineageinromance@gmail.com by 25 August 2017. 

New Book Series: Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Series Editors:

Kathleen Perry Long, Cornell University

Luke Morgan, Monash University

Advisory Board:

Elizabeth B. Bearden, University of Wisconsin Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington University Surekha Davies, Western Connecticut State University Richard H. Godden, Louisiana State University Maria Fabricius Hansen, University of Copenhagen Virginia A. Krause, Brown University Jennifer Spinks, University of Melbourne Debra Higgs Strickland, University of Glasgow Wes Williams, University of Oxford

 Publisher: MIP, The University Press at Kalamazoo 

For more information, visit: https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/monsters-prodigies-and-demons/

Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions, MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts, LMU Munich

cover170x170Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions (E13 TV-L, 66%), MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts at LMU Munich funded by the Elite Network of Bavaria, starting 1 April 2017
 Deadline for application: 1 November 2016.
The International Doctoral Program (IDP) MIMESIS is dedicated to innovative doctoral research in the fields of literature and the arts, with special emphasis on historical, theoretical and transdisciplinary perspectives. It will enable cooperation between research projects in literature, theatre, performance, music, film studies, architecture and the visual arts, offering both a forum and a framework in which interests drawn from any one of these areas enter into a dialogue with other areas in the wider spectrum of creative engagements. Its research program is framed by the term mimesis, a key concept throughout the history of the arts, right up to the most recent developments in critical and cultural theory. MIMESIS offers a structured program of doctoral study combining seminars, workshops, lecture series and master classes. In addition internships with leading cultural institutions and at partner universities will be integrated into the study program.
How to Apply: The applicants should hold an excellent/above average master’s degree or equivalent in literature, art history, theatre or film studies or related subjects. The outline of the research project should show an explicit connection to the research profile of the program (i.e. mimesis).
Please use the application tool on this website:
http://portal.graduatecenter-lmu.de/gc-application/
For further information please contact:
mimesis-doc@lmu.de

CFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature (2 sessions), IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.

edward_iii_of_england_order_of_the_garterCFP: Reconsidering the Boundaries of Late-Medieval Political Literature I and II, IMC, Kalamazoo, May 11-14, 2017.
Deadline: September 15, 2016

Organizers: Kristin Bourassa and Justin Sturgeon – Centre for Medieval Literature (University of Southern Denmark/University of York) & Canadian Society of Medievalists/Société canadienne des médiévistes

The increased engagement of late-medieval authors in very precise political conversations, and the way these writers justified their interventions in the political sphere by inserting themselves as characters in their own texts and creating authorial personas, have received increased scrutiny from scholars over the last several years. Some of the challenges of studying this literature include 1) the many recognizable genres involved, with individual texts often incorporating characteristics of multiple genres such as mirrors for princes, autobiography, allegory, travel narrative, and letters; and 2) the tendency to group such literature by language and/or modern national borders, making it difficult to consider medieval political literature in the context of the inter-regional conversations in which it often participated.

These three-paper sessions aim to take a broad and interdisciplinary view, using the term “political literature” to denote any form of writing that had the communication of political messages as one of its main goals. This includes visual elements such as images and marginalia, the physical layout of text and image, and the codicological structure of the manuscripts themselves. The sessions aim to open up the field of late medieval political literature and its manuscripts by thinking outside of modern definitions of genre, disciplinary conventions, and so-called “national” borders, with the broad goal of connecting scholars working in this area from different linguistic traditions and from the disciplinary perspectives of history, art history, and literature. Building on an upcoming workshop (March 2017) on late-medieval political literature in France, Burgundy, and England, our aim is to put literature from these regions into conversation with that produced in other areas. By holding two sessions, we hope to attract papers covering a larger variety of languages and geographical locations than could be accomplished with one session alone, and to build a longer-term network of scholars working on this material.

Questions the sessions might address include: How did authors view their own role as contributors to contemporary political conversations? What textual and/or visual tactics did they use to convey their messages? What audiences did they address? To what extent did writers attempt to criticize and/or support individual or institutional power? And how can considering political literature from interdisciplinary, as well as multiple geographical and linguistic traditions help us to better understand the political conversations taking place in a time of significant “international” problems such as the papal schism and the Hundred Years War? We will particularly welcome papers working from interdisciplinary perspectives and that can broaden our geographical scope.

Contact: Kristin Bourassa, kristin@sdu.dk

Summer School: intensive introduction to Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods, Notre Dame University, June 13-July 22

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Summer School: intensive introduction to Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods, Notre Dame University, June 13-July 22, 2016
Apply now! 
This summer, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is offering an intensive introduction to Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods (please see the attached poster). In this course, students will
  • learn about developments in medieval Latin (morphology, syntax, vocabulary, orthography and pronunciation)
  • practice close reading and accurate translation of a broad and representative selection of medieval Latin texts, including Latin influenced by another language; administrative Latin; technical texts; scholastic Latin; Latin of various professions; narrative accounts; imitations of classical style; formal styles; rhymed prose; cursus; ornamented styles; rhymed and metric poetry
  • review and practice the principal constructions of classical Latin
  • overcome your anxiety about sight reading
  • be introduced to the history, areas, and tools of medieval Latin philology through active exercises
  • work very hard, and have lots of fun!
The course runs from June 13-July 22. Online registration is open now. Visit summersession.nd.edu for additional information and to register. Graduate students who take Medieval Latin are eligible to compete for the Medieval Academy’s CARA (Centers and Regional Associations) scholarships, which provide full tuition for either course taken for credit. Visit medievalacademy.org for application details.
Should you have additional questions about the course, please contact the instructor, Dr. Andrew Irving, at airving1@nd.edu. Inquiries about registration and summer courses at Notre Dame should be directed to the Summer Session Registrar.

CFP: Medieval Hispanic Research Seminar @QMUL

2014-06-mhrc-colloq-gif1Call for papers: Medieval Hispanic Research Seminar @ the School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, Queen Mary, University of London, June 23-24, 2016.
Deadline: 25 April 2016

Papers concerning any aspect of the literature, language, history and culture
of the Iberian Peninsula in the Middle Ages will be considered. They will be
delivered in either English or Spanish and will last a maximum of twenty
minutes.
Submission: Proposals should be sent in the body of an email to mhrs-
colloquium@qmul.ac.uk by 25 April 2016. Please include name and institutional affiliation (as you wish them to appear on the programme), and a title and abstract of no more than 150 words.
Authors will receive confirmation of acceptance of proposals and details of registration via email after 6 May. Should you need a letter of confirmation please indicate this in your proposal email and provide full contact details. Accommodation is available for speakers in university halls of residence on campus.