Tag Archives: early modern

CFP: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018

smrs_logo_emailCall for Papers: Sixth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies, St Louis University, St Louis, Mo., USA, 18th-20th June, 2018
Deadline: December 31

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation on all topics and in all disciplines of the medieval and early modern worlds.

The Symposium is held on the beautiful midtown campus of Saint Louis University, hosted by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. On-campus housing options include affordable, air-conditioned dormitory rooms and a luxurious boutique hotel.

The plenary speakers for this year will be Geoffrey Parker, of The Ohio State University, and Carole Hillenbrand, of the University of St Andrews.

For more information, click here.

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Conference: Singular Acts: The Role of the Individual in the Transformation of Collective Culture, The Warburg Institute, 16 November 2017

410868Conference: Singular Acts: The Role of the Individual in the Transformation of Collective Culture, The Warburg Institute, 16 November 2017

The Warburg Institute will host its second Postgraduate Symposium on 16 November 2017. This year’s Symposium focuses on particular personalities who acted for or against historical and cultural change.  The Early Modern period saw seismic shifts across all aspects of society, ranging from technological developments to new artistic techniques; to innovations in philosophical thought and religious doctrine and scientific discoveries; to social and political movements. This interdisciplinary conference will appraise the extent to which such transformations were triggered or repressed by the acts of individuals such as innovators, pioneers, reformers and censors.

Attendance is free of charge. Pre-registrations required: https://warburgpostgradsymposium.eventbrite.co.uk

For more information: warburg.postgrad@gmail.com
https://warburgpostgrad.wordpress.com/

Organisers: Organisers: James Christie, Lorenza Gay, Hanna Gentili, Lydia Goodson, Vito Guida, Antonia Karaisl, Finn Schulze-Feldmann, Genevieve Verdigel. 

PROGRAMME 2017

INTRODUCTION
10:15 – 10:30 Professor Bill Sherman (Director of The Warburg Institute)

SESSION 1: Art and Invention
Chair: Lorenza Gay (The Warburg Institute)


10:30 – 10:50 Allegra Baggio Corradi (The Warburg Institute)
A Book, a Bust and a Pelican Pet: Philosophy, Art and Zoology in Niccolò Leonico Tomeo’s Cinquecento Padua

10:50 – 11:10 Mauricio Oviedo Salazar (University of Amsterdam)
The Legacy of the Poeta-theologus: Salutati’s Influence in 15th-century Italian Art

 11:10 – 11:30 Response and discussion.

 11:30 – 11:45 Tea

 SESSION 2: Challenging Established Philosophies

Chair: Genevieve Verdigel (The Warburg Institute)

 11:45 – 12:05 Maria Vittoria Comacchi (University of Venice)
Marsilio Ficino’s renovatio antiquorum through Leone Ebreo’s Dialoghi d’amore: a philosophical theological Reform before the Reformation

12:05 – 12:25 Salvatore Carannante (Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento, Florence)
‘A Mercury sent down by the Gods’: Bruno’s Self-Representation between Ancient Wisdom and Nova Filosofia

 12:25 – 12:45 Response and discussion.

 12:45-14:00 Lunch

SESSION 3: Within/Without Institutions
Chair : Antonia Karaisl (The Warburg Institute)

14:00– 14:20 Sophie-Bérangère Singlard (Université Paris-Sorbonne)
To be an Influential Humanist and to become an Important Name in 16th-century Spain: The Case of Francisco Sánchez de las Brozas

14:20 – 14:40 Hasan Siddiqui (University of Chicago)
Critical Modes of the Scholarly Life in Early-Modern South Asia 

14:40 – 15:00 Response and discussion.

15:00 – 15:15 Tea

SESSION 4: The Patron and the Poet: self-fashioning in words, art, and music

Chair: Lydia Goodson (The Warburg Institute)

15:15 – 15:35 Elisa Zucchini (University of Florence)
Art and Music in Gran Principe Ferdinando de’ Medici’s Patronage

15:35 – 15:55 James Barry (University of Cambridge)
Vanity Projects: Thomas Lyster’s Fragments (1714) and the commercialisation of individualism in late seventeenth and early eighteenth century print culture

15:55 – 16:15 Response and discussion.

16:15 – 17:15 Keynote AddressDr Ben Thomas, (Co-Curator of the 2017 Exhibition ‘Raphael, The Drawings’ at the Ashmolean; University of Kent)

 ‘Raphael: Singular Acts of Drawing’

17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks: Professor Michelle O’Malley (Assistant Director of The Warburg Institute)

17:30 – 18:30 Reception

 

 

Conference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 November 2017

san-giacomo-dall-orioConference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 Nov 2017, Ca’ Foscari University, Venice, November 9 – 10, 2017

“La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio: una trama millenaria di arte e fede” (Chiese di Venezia, Nuove prospettive di ricerca, 6), cur. by Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini and Deborah Howard

Like every Venetian parish church, the evolution of San Giacomo dall’Orio has been closely interconnected with the development of the surrounding area. Its free-standing site, however, remains unusual, shared only by the church of Santa Maria Formosa; like the latter, its facade addresses the canal while the apses project into the campo.
Over the centuries the parish became progressively marginalised: the area within the original parish boundaries is now landlocked, with access to the Grand Canal only possible by means of a network of small canals.  The availability of land and the spread of modest, functional housing blocks for artisans and workers — combined with the distance from the centre (which became dominated by the San Marco-Rialto axis) — led to the development of the area around San Giacomo dall’Orio as an industrial zone, dedicated in particular to wool manufacture.
Although the area became primarily a popular quarter, it still preserves several palaces erected by noble families, among them that of the diarist Marin Sanudo.  In addition, the city’s first anatomy theatre was located in the present Corte dell’Anatomia, while in 1671, thanks to an initiative of the Loredan family, the College of Surgeons was founded on the south side of the church.
This conference, therefore, aims to address the more general social and urban characteristics of the parish, and to contextualise the church within the varied daily life of the campo.  This space hosted a range of activities: ludic (remaining unpaved until the eighteenth century, it was used as a football field, even by players from noble families); religious (it was the scene of numerous confraternity processions); and socio-economic (including the practice of crafts).
The church of San Giacomo dall’Orio was probably founded towards the end of the tenth century, even if its documented status as a parish only dates back to 1130.  Rebuilt in 1225, the church acquired its main elements thanks to radical restorations after the earthquake of 1345: the aisled transepts and the present ship’s-keel roof probably date from this time.
Between the end of the Quattrocento and the mid Cinquecento the church was subject to various renovations in the presbytery, nave and aisles, leading to its present configuration.  In particular, following the removal of the rood screen at the entrance to the presbytery, the stalls were transferred to the apse.  The organ was relocated to a wooden organ loft over the main entrance portal — one of the oldest surviving examples of this arrangement.
After the mid Cinquecento, various alterations mainly concerned the interior, which houses works by such celebrated artists as Veronese and Palma Giovane.  Moreover, the parish became the setting for the altars and ritual activities of numerous confraternities, including the important Scuola del Sacramento, whose members came from a wide social range.
Interventions since the middle of the Settecento include the addition of partition walls in the transepts (later removed), the construction of a new sacristy during a programme of structural and decorative repairs at the start of the twentieth century, and, fifty years ago, a complete refurbishment of the presbytery.
Spoils and precious marbles – such as the flecked black marble Ionic column and the unusual polylobed holy water stoop – remained long after these had passed out of fashion.  The beautiful marble pulpit is unique in the city.  At the same time, the almost complete absence of wall-tombs and the relative lack of family chapels serve to underline that this was a popular quarter with few elite families.  One of the most important patrons was the parish priest Giovanni Maria da Ponte, who commissioned a cycle of paintings for the Old Sacristy.  The eucharistic symbol in the centre of the ceiling by Palma il Giovane, not to mention the Sacrament Chapel itself, indicate the growing devotion to the Holy Sacrament.  Even if the apostolic visitations of the late sixteenth-century mention certain deficiencies, the programme of artistic renewal during the Counter Reformation reflects the parish’s serious response to post-Tridentine reforms.
The remarkable spatial and artistic coherence that characterises the whole building is not easily explained by the usual practices of art-historical and architectural analysis.  It is now recognised, of course, that an appreciation of the ceremonial, liturgical and devotional practices, especially those connected with the life and character of the parish, constitute an essential element in the understanding of a sacred building and its many individual details.  The proposed conference therefore seeks to interpret this historic church within its broader historical and geographical context.
The dissemination of knowledge of Venetian churches, to audiences of experts and non-specialists alike, is a characteristic of the conferences organized by the project “Chiese di Venezia. Nuove prospettive di ricerca”. The wide participation of the public (at the sessions and guided tours) in the five conferences organized annually since 2011 has demonstrated the effectiveness of this type of gathering.
Visits to the church will be organised as part of the programme.

Program
9, November
– Ca’ Dolfin, 10.00-13.00
10.00-10.15 Registration
10.15-10.30 Welcome. Martina Frank (Università Ca’ Foscari), Gianmario Guidarelli (Università degli Studi di Padova)
10.30-10.45 Introduction. Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Deborah Howard
Session “Il contesto urbano”, chair: Deborah Howard (University of Cambridge)
10.45-11.15, Michela Agazzi (Università Ca’ Foscari), “San Giacomo dall’Orio, il contesto”

11.15-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.00 Edoardo Demo (Università degli Studi di Verona), “Società e vita industriale”
12.00 -12.30 Jane Stevens Crawshaw (Oxford Brookes University), “Life, death and the Anatomy Theatre in early modern Venice”
12.30-13.00 Discussion
13.00-14.30 Lunch

-Ca’ Dolfin, 14.30-18.15
Session “La vita della parrocchia”, chair Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova)
14.30-15.00 Pascal Vuillemin (Université Savoie Mont Blanc, “Una parrocchia tra due sedi: San Giacomo dall’Orio nel Medioevo (XII-XV secc.)”
15.00-15.45 Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari) and Jean-François Chauvard (Université de Lyon 2), “Appunti sugli stati delle anime a San Giacomo a fine Cinquecento”
15.45-16.15 Discussion
16.15-16.45 Coffee break

16.45-17.15 Francesco Trentini (Università Ca’ Foscari), “L’apostolo, il matamoros, il pellegrino. Le molteplici connotazioni del titolo di San Giacomo dall’Orio (secoli X-XVI)”
17.15-1745 Elena Quaranta(Università Ca’ Foscari), “Musica e musicisti a San Giacomo dall’Orio: un’indagine archivistica”
17.45-18.15 Discussion

novembre, 10th
Ca’ Dolfin, 9.30-12.45
-Session “Conservazione e trasformazione”, chair Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari)
9.30-10.00 Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova), “Il complesso dell’organo: trasformazioni architettoniche e funzionalità liturgica”
10.00-10.30 Adriano Amendola (Università degli Studi di Salerno), “Tra Oriente e Occidente: i marmi policromi della chiesa di San Giacomo dall’Orio”
10.30-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.15 Coffee break

11.15-11.45 Marie-Louise Lillywhite (University of Warwick), “The Decorative Programme after the Council of Trent”
11.45-12.15 Thomas Worthen (Drake University), Altars and other furnishings for the Scuola del SS. Sacramento in San Giacomo dall’Orio
12.15-12.45 Discussion
12.45-15.00 lunch

15.00-17.00 Church of di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Session “in situ”, Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Gianmario Guidarelli, Deborah Howard.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CONF: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio (Venice, 9-10 Nov 17). In: ArtHist.net, Oct 19, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16534>.

CFP: International Graduate Students Colloquium, “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries)”, Amiens (France) 29-30 May 2018

afficheCall For Papers: International Graduate Students Colloquium, “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries),” Amiens (France), 29-30 May 2018
Deadline: 15 January 2018

The research laboratory Trame (Texts, Representations, Archaeology and Memory from Antiquity to the Renaissance) of the University of Picardie Jules Verne associated with the research unit Transitions. Middle Ages and First Modernity (University of Liège) and with the Center for Advanced Studies in the Renaissance of the University François Rabelais (Tours) is organising three international meetings implemented by PhD students of these three institutions. the aim of the meetings is to enable exchanges and discussions between PhD students, junior researchers and experimented colleagues.

The first meeting will be held in Liège on Tuesday the 30th of January and Wednesday the 31st of January 2018 on the theme “Transition(s): concept, methods and case studies (14th-17th centuries)”.

The second meeting will be held in Amiens on Tuesday the 29 th of May and Wednesday the 30rd of May 2018 on the theme : “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries)”

This colloquium will be divided into two parts: first, the choice of the place of the building, and then the choice of the place of the object.
The construction of a new building usually start with an important thinking concerning the localization. The choice is strategic or symbolic, sometimes both, and depend on its function, its sponsor and its geographical context. For example, a monastery will set up on a secluded place or, in the contrary, on an urban center; a military fortress must occupy a strategic place to dominate a territory etc. In this way, it’s interesting to study all these factors, actors and issues regarding the establishment process in a rural, urban or suburban context. In the same way, objects (such as paintings, sculptures, precious objects, reliquaries, pieces of jewellery, funerary monuments, pieces of furniture, symbols of power etc.) are interesting to study. A lot of them need to be placed on a specific location, whether it’s in a real place or in the composition of a bidimensional work. The place where the object is arranged can be modified in consequence as there
are interactions between them. The goal of this meeting is to gauge the notion of place in all its forms in order to understand its meaning and its importance during the Middle Ages and First Modernity.

Day 1: The place of the Building
This first day will be focused on the buildings. The statements have to match the three
following approaches:
– The location choices of the edifice: how the place was chosen? Who were the actors of this choice? What were the effects of this implantation on a local and global historical context? Studies could focus on a specific place, a religious community, an edifice or an archaeological site. It’s a matter of showing the location strategies and the territorial transformations after the creation of a new “place of power” or a place of production in a historical and geographical context.
– The place‘s portrayal is the second theme: why did they choose this place? How is it
represented and why? Are they accurate the original place? How fictive places are show? The statements have to consider the different means used to point out peculiar location and the underlying goals.
– The place’s references in the sources: how literature and manuscripts mention those places whether real or fictive? What is the purpose in those texts? In an illuminated book, how is introduced the description of the place and what are the connections between the picture and the text? The statements could cover the evolution of the terms used to qualify a place. For example, the Latin word “prioratus” is barely used to qualify a priory between the 11th and the 13th centuries in manuscripts but we find lot of others words like house, farm, church etc.

Day 2: The place of the object
Concerning the place of the object we propose the three following themes:
– The position of the object:  usually, special objects are put in specific places: a building, a public space or a private one, or even a tomb. It would be interesting to attempt to understand why those objects have been placed in well-chosen areas, which were the factors and the issues according to which this decision has been made and by who. The history of the different places in which an object dating back to the 11th to the 17th century has been settled from his creation up to the present time can be made through a historiographical perspective. Reflections focusing on the methods used by historians, historians of arts or archaeologists to identify the original place of an object are
welcomed.
– Interaction between the object and the place: the goal is to think about the conjoint and
disjointed evolution of the building and the object: which are the impacts of the mutations and the intern reconstructions of the building on the object? How a building can specifically be built to accommodate one or several objects? This theme concerns both religious and public spaces, but also private places and the first experiences in museum architecture linked to a collection. Once again, all reflections about the methodology used to understand those interactions are welcomed.
– Representation of the object in paintings, illuminated manuscripts and sculptures: this
third theme invite to wonder about the methods used to represent the object on pieces of art. How is it put on the spot when it plays a central role in the pieces of art? How an object can be used to build up the composition of a picture?

Contribution Modalities
Lectures should relate to history, archaeology, history of arts and literature, from the 11th to the 17th century. The purpose is to have a brand new and interdisciplinary view on the notion of “place” which finally concern several research subjects. Communications should try to introduce historiographical elements enabling to develop comparisons between the different interventions and to think about the notion of “place” nd its evolution through time.

The proposals are expected for the 15th of January 2018 at the latest. They should be fifteen-line summary of the proposed lecture addressed to the Organising Committee, send together with a CV, the title of the thesis et the name of the research director(s). Candidate will be informed of the approval or the rejection of their proposal by the 15 th of February 2018.
Lectures should last 20 minutes maximum, with the possibility to project a Powerpoint. They can be made in French or in English.
We will unfortunately not be able to provide you financial help for the accommodation or the transport.
If you need an attestation to valorise your participation, we will be able to provide it.
Please do not hesitate to contact us if you need further information.
Organising Committee:
– Julie Colaye, PhD student in medieval history : juliecolaye@gmail.com
– Marie Quillent, PhD student in history of medieval art : marie.quillent@wanadoo.fr

Job: Assistant Professor of Early Modern Art in Italy, Dartmouth College, starting July 1, 2018

1024px-dartmouth_college_shield-svgJob: Assistant Professor of Early Modern Art in Italy, Dartmouth College, starting July 1, 2018
Deadline: 30 November 2017

The Department of Art History at Dartmouth College invites applications for a scholar of early modern art in Italy (c. 1400 – 1700) for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor. We are especially interested in candidates who situate early modern Italy within broader European and global contexts, such as cultural exchanges with the Americas, North Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and/or Asia. We seek a scholar-teacher who is committed to innovative research and undergraduate education. In addition to specialized courses, the successful candidate will also participate in our general survey sequence, our foreign study program in Rome, and our advanced seminar in Art Historical Theories and Methods. A PhD in Art History or a related field is required at the point of hire (July 1, 2018).

The Art History Department has eight and one-half tenure line faculty and regularly sponsors post-doctoral fellows. While the number of majors is small, our courses enjoy strong enrollments from a broad constituency of students and we have a strong record of placing students in top PhD programs and related professional fields. Many of our courses are cross-listed with other programs such as Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; Latin American, Latinx, and Caribbean Studies, Middle Eastern Studies; Asian Societies, Cultures and Languages; and Comparative Literature. Current Art History faculty members participate in a variety of campus research and pedagogical initiatives such as digital humanities and experiential learning.  We welcome applicants interested in forging research and curricular links with other campus units.

Students at Dartmouth College are diverse by many measures. We particularly seek applicants with an interest in teaching and mentoring of students from all backgrounds (including first-generation college students, low-income students, racial and ethnic minorities, women, LGBTQ, etc.). We are especially interested in candidates who will contribute to Dartmouth’s diversity initiatives that focus on undergraduate research. Notably, four recent Art History majors have been awarded the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship.

To apply, please provide a letter of application, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, evidence of teaching experience, a dissertation abstract, and a chapter of the dissertation or a published article. All materials should be submitted through Interfolio apply.interfolio.com/44946 .

Application review will begin December 1, 2017 and continue until the position is filled. Preliminary interviews will take place at the CAA conference in February 2018 and by Skype for those unable to attend the conference. Inquiries can be directed to Samantha S. B. Potter, Department of Art History, 6033 Carpenter Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover NH, 03755-3570.  email: Samantha.SB.Potter@Dartmouth.edu

 

Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018

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Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS, London: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018
All lectures begin at 7.00 p.m. in the Khalili Lecture Theatre (Main School Lecture Theatre) –  unless indicated otherwise – Philips Building, SOAS, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

 

  • 11 October 2017: The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings,’ Dr Tom Nickson, Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
  • 15 November 2017: Reviving Islamic Architecture in Khedivial Cairo, and Beyond: a Collector’s Passion, Dr Mercedes Volait, CRNS Research Professor at INHA, Paris
  • 6 December 2017: Takht-e Soleyman/Iran – From Sasanian Fire Temple to Ilkhanid Summer Palace. New Evidence from Old Excavations, Dr Ute Franke,                                       Deputy Director, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Berlin
  • 10 January 2018: The Hadassah and Daniel Khalili Memorial Lecture in Islamic Art and Culture: The Calligrapher, the Painter, and the Patron: A New Perspective on the Freer Khusraw u Shirin, Dr Simon Rettig, Assistant Curator of Islamic Art, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • 21 February 2018: In the service of religion? The display of ‘science from the Islamic world’ in the museum, Dr Silke Ackermann, Director, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford
  • 14 March 2018: The Seventh Bahari Foundation Lecture in Iranian Art and Culture: Decagonal and Quasicrystalline Geometry in the Architecture of Medieval Persia and Its Influence in the Greater Islamic World, Dr Peter J. Lu, Department of Physics and SEAS, Harvard University, USA
  • 25 April 2018: Islamic Textiles from Iberia: Re-evaluating Their Role in the Mediterranean Context, Dr Ana Cabrera-Lafuente, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  • 9 May 2018: Ilse Sturkenboom
  • 13 June 2018: Ahmet Ersoy

For further information please contact Rosalind Wade Haddon: 07714087480 or                 rosalindhaddon@gmail.com

 

 

 

Call for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich

csm_05-03_Ptolemaeus_ce38187a3aCall for Applications: Visiting fellowships 2018 (1–4 months), Ptolemaus Arabus et Latinus Project, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Munich
Deadline: 1 October 2017

The project Ptolemaeus Arabus et Latinus (PAL) is dedicated to the edition and
study of the Arabic and Latin versions of Ptolemy’s astronomical and astrological texts
and related material. These include works by Ptolemy or attributed to him,
commentaries thereupon and other works that are of immediate relevance to
understanding Ptolemy’s heritage in the Middle Ages and the early modern period up
to 1700 A.D.
The project is hosted by the Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften in Munich for a
period of 25 years from 2013 to 2037. It is supervised by Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus
Hasse (University of Würzburg) and carried out by five scholars, including two
research leaders, Dr. David Juste and Dr. Benno van Dalen, two post-doctoral
researchers and one doctoral student.
We welcome applications for visiting fellowships tenable in Munich for a period of one
to four months between 1 January and 30 November 2018. The next round of visiting
fellowships is planned for 2020.
-The fellowships amount to € 3100 per month for senior scholars (PhD degree
awarded before 1 January 2013), € 2600 per month for post-docs (PhD degree
awarded after 31 December 2012) and € 1300 per month for doctoral students. In
special cases an additional travel grant may be awarded to overseas applicants. The
fellowships are not liable to taxation in Germany and do not include health
insurance or social benefits.
-Fellows will be offered office facilities at the Bayerische Akademie der
Wissenschaften in Munich, together with the research team, and are expected to
work in Munich most of the time. Fellows will be given access to the research
facilities of the project, including the project’s collection of manuscript
reproductions, and to the research libraries in Munich.
-Fellows are expected to do research in an area relevant to the project and to share
their experience and insights with the other members of the research team.
Research proposals to deal with Ptolemaic sources in languages other than Arabic
and Latin (especially Greek, Syriac, Hebrew and Persian) are also welcome.
-Applications should be sent in English to Prof. Dr. Dag Nikolaus Hasse by email (applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de) before 1 October 2017. Applications should include a complete CV with a list of publications and a research proposal of no more than 500 words. Applicants are asked to state in their research proposal the preferred duration of the fellowship (one, two, three or four months) and to propose a starting date.
Receipt of the application will be acknowledged and the outcome of all applications will be notified by email no later than 31 October 2017.
For further information, please visit our website http://ptolemaeus.badw.de. For
further enquiries, contact Dr. Claudia Dorl at applications@ptolemaeus.badw.de.