Tag Archives: early modern

Conference: Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era, London, November 8–9, 2018

slid-charlatanesVenue: Senate House, Bedford Room 37 (8th Nov); Bush House, KCL S2.01 and Instituto Cervantes (9th Nov)

Keynote speakers: Prof Trevor Dadson and Dr Alexander Samson

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.

Click here for a full programme and here to book tickets

Organisers: Roser López Cruz (King’s College London) and Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Conference website: https://iberianintolerance.com

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Conference: Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean, UNED, Madrid, October 26, 2018

Image result for portolano mediterraneoINTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean: sociability networks and artistic creation in the Late Medieval and Early Modern periods
UNED, Madrid 26 de octubre de 2018.

9.30. Presentación
SESIÓN 1: Alteridades móviles: La visión del otro en la literatura y el arte
Modera: Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza (UCM)
10:00-10:20: Representando al otro: tejidos y vestidos en los espacios de sociabilidad en el siglo XV castellano. Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
10:20-10:40: The Fifth Column: rethinking the Morisco’s visual representation. Borja Franco Llopis (UNED).
10:40-11:00: La visión del cristiano como “otro”. Alteridad en el Mediterráneo Otomano. Miguel Ángel de Bunes Ibarra (CSIC).
11:00-11:30: DEBATE
11:30-12:00: PAUSA-CAFÉ

Sesión 2: Redes de saber, redes de poder: Objetos y conocimientos en circulación
Modera: Consuelo Gómez López (UNED)
12:00-12:20: Movilidad, circulación, interacción. La formación de un grupo de presión belicista en la monarquía policéntrica de los Habsburgo (Génova, Madrid, País Vasco – siglo XVI) Bastien Carpentier (Université Littoral Côte d’Opale)
12:20-12:40: No solo inventarios. Bibliotecas en movimiento en el Mediterráneo. Margarita Vázquez Manassero (UNED)
12:40-13:00: Un mar en papeles para los ojos de Felipe II: la ciencia y el dibujo del ingeniero. Alicia Cámara Muñoz (UNED)
13:00-13:30: DEBATE
13:30-15:30: COMIDA

Sesión 3: El Mediterráneo: espacio de conflicto, espacio de intercambio.
Modera: Fernando Rodríguez Mediano (CSIC-CORPI)
15.30-15:50: Los espías del rey. La inteligencia hispano-imperial contra el turco (siglo XVI) Gennaro Varriale (Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”)
15:50-16:10 Caravaggio in Malta and his connection to the Ottoman Art. Filiz Çakir Phillip (Aga Khan Museum Toronto).
16:10-16:30: Between objects and subjects: slaves and religious artifacts in the 17th Mediterranean. Daniel Hershenzon (University of Connecticut)
16:30-17:00 DEBATE
17:00-17:30: PAUSA CAFÉ

Sesión 4: Un Mediterráneo global. Dinámicas transoceánicas  del siglo XVI
Modera: Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
17:30-17:50 Lepanto in the Americas: Global Storytelling and Mediterranean History. Stefan Hanß (University of Manchester)
17:50-18:10: American objects at the beginning of the sixteenth century Antonio Urquízar Herrera (UNED).
18:10-18:30: DEBATE

18.30 CONCLUSIONES Y CLAUSURA

Evento patrocinado por la Facultad de Geografía e Historia y el Departamento de Historia del Arte de la UNED y organizado dentro del proyecto: HAR2016-80354-P. IMPI. Antes del orientalismo: Las “imágenes” del musulmán en la Península Ibérica (siglos XV-XVII) y sus conexiones mediterráneas (Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Universidades- Fondos FEDER).
Actividad del Grupo de Investigación: Arte y Pensamiento en la Edad Moderna y Contemporánea

Dirección científica: Elena Paulino Montero
Coordinación científica: Borja Franco Llopis

Click here for more information

CFP: ‘Recovering the Ritual Object in Medieval and Early Modern Art,’ AAH Conference, Brighton, 4–6 Apr 2019

DjWmmKBXcAUB1yCDeadline: Nov 5, 2018

“Recovering the Ritual Object in Medieval and Early Modern Art”

Session Convenors: Dr Catriona Murray, University of Edinburgh, c.a.murray@ed.ac.uk; Dr Halle O’Neal, University of Edinburgh, halle.o’neal@ed.ac.uk

In the medieval and early modern worlds, ritual served as a legitimising process, a dynamic mechanism for mediating a transference or transformation of status. Objects played an essential part in this performative practice, charged with symbolism and invested with power. Distanced from their original contexts, however, these artefacts have often been studied for their material properties, disconnecting function from form and erasing layers of meaning. The relationships between ritual objects and ritual participants were identity-forming, reflecting and shaping belief structures. Understanding of how these objects were experienced as well as viewed, is key to revealing their significances.

DjWniZ5XsAAAiJ0This panel intends to relocate ritual objects at the centre of both religious and secular ceremonies, interrogating how they served as both signifiers and agents of change. The organisers specialise in early modern British art and medieval Japanese art, and so we invite proposals from a range of geographical perspectives, in order to investigate this subject from a cross-cultural perspective. We particularly encourage papers which discuss medieval and early modern ritual objects—broadly defined —as social mediators.

Issues for discussion include but are not limited to:
– Recovery of the everyday in ritual objects
– Embodiment
– Audiences and interactions
– Performativity
– Ritual object as emotional object
– Spatiality and temporality
– Re-use, recycling, removal
– Illusion and imagination
– Memory
– Thing theory

How to apply: Please email your paper proposal direct to the session convenors, details above. Provide a title and abstract (250 words maximum) for a 25-minute paper, your name and institutional affiliation (if any).

Fellowship: Post-doctoral Research Fellowship at the Henry Moore Institute, Deadline 16/04/2018

Henry Moore

The Henry Moore Institute is a world-recognised centre for the study of sculpture in the heart of Leeds, funded by The Henry Moore Foundation. An award-winning exhibitions venue, research centre, library and sculpture archive, the Institute hosts a year-round programme of exhibitions, conferences, lectures, research, and publications that aim to expand the understanding and scholarship of historical and contemporary sculpture.

The Institute invites applications for a two-year fellowship, beginning in Spring 2018. Based at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds, the Post-doctoral Fellow’s research focus should be pre-twentieth-century, paying particular attention to the ways in which history is engaged with in the present.

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Call for Papers: University of Kent Medieval and Early Modern Studies Summer Festival 15-16/06/2018, Deadline 23/03/2018

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Now in its fourth year, MEMS Summer Festival is a two-day celebration of the Medieval and Early Modern periods, including the study of religion, politics, history, art, drama, literature, and domestic culture from c. 400 – 1800. The festival, hosted at the University of Kent, is designed to bring together scholars from a range of disciplines, academic schools, and institutions. MEMS Fest aims to be an informal space in which postgraduate students, early career researchers, and academics can share ideas and foster conversations, while building a greater sense of community. Undergraduate students in their final year of study are also welcome to participate in the conference.

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Job: Lecturer/senior lecturer in art history c. 1400-1800

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Salary:  Competitive salary
Closing Date:  Wednesday 21 February 2018
Interview Date:  See advert
Reference:  189

The Courtauld Institute of Art is the UK’s leading institution for teaching and research in Art History and the conservation of paintings; it is also home to one of the finest small art museums in the world. The Art History department has an outstanding research and teaching record from Late Antiquity to the Contemporary with an increasingly global outlook, and embraces its diversity of theoretical approaches and methodologies.

The Courtauld wishes to appoint a full-time Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Art History, to begin on 1 September 2018. The successful candidate will complement the existing teaching strengths of the Department and will have a research focus in any region or period from c.1400-1800. We seek an art historian who situates their research in a wider, global context, and who shares a ‘decentred’ approach that avoids focus on only a single part of the world. An ideal candidate would be able to teach across at least one other field in a way directed by concepts of exchange and interaction, and to build bridges with other areas of art historical investigation. The candidate is expected to be able to situate their work in the theoretical and historiographical debates in their specialised research area and also engage with current issues in global Art History.

The appointee will research and publish to the highest quality and will actively pursue and apply for appropriate research grants; will provide inspiring teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels; and will play an active role in the life and administration of The Courtauld.

PAY: Grade 6 (£36,644 to £41,958) or Grade 7 (£43,117 to £49,461), depending on experience

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 21 February 2018, 23:59 GMT

INTERVIEW DATE: Interviews will be held in the week of 19 March 2018

Seminaires de la Chaire europeenne du College de France (Paris, 25 Jan-4 Jun 18)

zad57kid_mediumAmphithéâtre Marguerite de Navarre, 11, place Marcelin-Berthelot, 75005 Paris, January 25 – June 4, 2018

Prof. Victor Stoichita, invité de la Chaire européenne du Collège de France
Année académique 2017-2018

Cours les vendredis à 10h00, suivi du séminaire à 11h00
(ouverture 2 février 2018).

Leçon inaugurale, jeudi 25 janvier, 18 heures sur :
«Textes, textures, images»
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