Tag Archives: early modern

Looking back: Medieval & Early Modern Festival, University of Kent, June 2017

The 16th-17th June 2017 was the third annual MEMS Festival, a two-day celebration of all things Medieval and Early Modern at the University of Kent. Papers covered all kinds of topics, from art and literature to politics, identity, and everyday life from the entire period. The range of material meant that lots of different areas of expertise were brought together, leading to interesting discussions and comparisons. There were also lots of exciting practical workshops, such as a “mystery trail” in the Special Collections and Archives and workshopping a scene from the York Corpus Christi play with Claire Wright (University of Kent).

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Kent undergraduate students present their final year dissertations

The two dedicated medieval art sessions covered objects from far and wide. The first panel looked at style and symbolism over the artistic networks in England and France. Cassandra Harrington (University of Kent) gave probably a paper on foliate head keystones, looking at a particular example from the chapter house at Cluny, and distinguishing them from the usual interpretation of such heads as “Green Men”. Angela Websdale’s (University of Kent) paper on the “lost” wall paintings at Faversham Cathedral investigated a potential Westminster workshop moving between London and Kent, while Alice Ball’s (University of Kent) considered images of the Prodigal Son, in particular how the iconography of the windows at Chartres cathedral may have influenced the Bibles Moralisees.

The second medieval art panel was made up of three students who had just finished their undergraduate degrees at the University of Kent, who all presented on their recently-completed dissertations. Michael Gittins gave a fresh look at a well-known object, considering the heraldry and weapons pictured in the Morgan Picture Bible to make a convincing argument that Walter of Brienne may have been the original patron. In contrast, Lucy Splarn’s paper turned towards a tiny and much less well-known pilgrimage badge of St Thomas Becket, looking at the unusual iconography of the saint riding a peacock (see embedded 3D model). This could have been a representation of Thomas’s personality, and the idea that he was arrogant in his outward appearance but humble inside, which tied in well with Paul Binski’s paper at the Thomas Becket study day on the concept of personality in the Middle Ages. Catherine Heydon gave the third paper, on the idea of Purgatory in the thought of St Augustine, thinking about the way in which the imagery of Classical thought influenced the theology of the early Church.

Medieval and Early Modern art made an appearance in other sessions as well. Hannah Straw (University of Kent) gave a paper on the imagery of Charles II’s escape in the Boswell Oak tree and how it was used to shape the king’s public identity. Emily Guerry (University of Kent) also looked at public identity and the use of history, by examining the significance of James Comey’s (mis)quotation of Henry II in his testimony, and the way in which the past can be used in the public imagination.

Each afternoon of the conference was taken up with activities and workshops, which was a great opportunity to get some hands-on work with objects and new technologies. This included a set of workshops and a tour of Eastbridge Pilgrim’s Hospital, which would have been a stopping point for hundreds of visitors to St Thomas’s shrine. Despite the ancient surroundings, two of these were on new technologies for approaching medieval objects and buildings, using GIS mapping and 3D modelling to see medieval art in a new way. Amy Jeffs (Digital Pilgrim Project) led a workshop on digitising pilgrim souvenirs and using software to enable better study and public appreciation of objects which are usually difficult to access, leading to a discussion on the benefits and potential issues of digitalisation. Tim Beach also used technologies to explore medieval art, but on a much larger scale, demonstrating how 3D laser scanning can be used to make a perfect 3D digital representation of medieval buildings, performing a live demonstration on the undercroft of Eastbridge Hospital itself.

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Attendees take part  in a workshop in the Eastbridge Hospital Chapel

The whole conference was an exciting look at new research and approaches to medieval and early modern history, and the diverse mix of papers meant that lots of interesting discussions were happening all through the weekend, finishing up in the beautiful space of Eastbridge Hospital. The festival showcased the new research in the History of Art emerging from the University of Kent, both in relation to the wealth of local art around Canterbury itself, and the international nature of work being done, with a particular focus on the art of France and networks between France and England.    

Review by Han Tame

Postgraduate, University of Kent

CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500-1800) (London, 18 Nov 17)

The contested concept of “reproduction” stands at a critical nexus of
the conceptualisation of Early Modern artistic thought. The early
modern period has been characterised by the development of novel and
efficient reproduction technologies, as well as the emergence of global
empires, growing interconnectedness through trade, warfare and
conquest, and the rise of new markets and cultures of collecting. This
ethos of innovation and cultural exchange was, however, contextualised
against myriad contemporary ideologies still rooted in the values and
legends of narratives of the past. Reproduction stood at the centre of
this dichotomy. Set against the context of changing cultural tastes and
the increasingly overlapping public and private spheres,
‘reproductions’ were involved within changing viewing practices,
artistic pedagogy, acts of homage and collecting.

The idea of reproduction connotes a number of tensions: between
authenticity and counterfeit; consumption and production; innovation
and imitation; the establishment of archetype and the creation of
replica; the conceptual value of the original and the worth of the
reproduction as a novel work of art; the display of contextualised
knowledge and the de-contextualisation of the prototype. At the same
time, production is shaped historically through practices and
discourses, and has figured as a key site for analysis in the work of,
for example, Walter Benjamin, Richard Wolin, Richard Etlin, Ian Knizek
and Yvonne Sheratt. Participants are invited to explore reproduction
‘beyond Benjamin’, investigating both the technical and philosophical
implications of reproducing a work of art and seeking, where possible,
a local anchoring for the physical and conceptual processes involved.

We welcome proposals for papers that investigate the theme of
reproduction from the early modern period (c.1500-1800), including
painting, print making, sculpture, decorative arts, architecture,
graphic arts and the intersections between them. Papers can explore
artistic exchanges across geopolitical, cultural and disciplinary
divides and contributions from other disciplines, such as the history
of science and conservation, are welcome. Topics for discussion may
include, but are not limited to:

The conceptualisation and processes of reproduction and reproduction
technologies before and at the advent of ‘the mechanical’;
Reproduction in artistic traditions beyond ‘the West’;
The slippage between innovation and imitation;
Part-reproduction and the changing, manipulation and developments of
certain motifs;
Problematizing the aura of ‘authenticity’ and the ‘value’ of the
original, copies and collecting;
Fakes and the de-contextualisation of a work through its reproduction;
Reproduction within non-object based study e.g. architecture;
Theoretical alternatives and the vocabulary used to describe the
process and results of reproduction in contemporary texts.
Please send proposals of no more than 300 words along with a 150 word
biography by 6th July 2017 to kyle.leyden@courtauld.ac.uk and
natasha.morris@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by Kyle Leyden, Natasha Morris and Angela Benza (The
Courtauld Institute of Art)

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Recasting Reproduction (1500–1800) (London, 18 Nov 17). In:
H-ArtHist, Jun 6, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/15728>.

At Close Quarters: Experiencing the Domestic, 1400-1600

unnamedThis interdisciplinary conference examines late medieval and early modern experiences ‘at close quarters’. Building on recent research into the architecture and objects that shaped the pre-modern household, we examine the nooks and crannies, challenges and constructions of the domestic environment, and its interaction with art, literature and thought.

Register here.

Friday, 3rd March. York. Bowland Auditorum, Berrick Saul Building.

Registration 9.00-9.20
Welcome 9.20

Conference Keynote 9.30-10.30

Tara Hamling (University of Birmingham) and Catherine Richardson (University of Kent) A Day at Home in Early Modern England: The Materiality of Domestic Life.

Coffee 10.30-11.00

Session One 11.00-12.30: Challenging Domesticities

Doron Bauer and Elena Paulino (Florida State University and Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence) The Textual Construction of Domestic Spaces in Late Medieval and Early Modern Majorca.
Angela Nicholls (University of Warwick) Hearth and Home: Living in An Almshouse in Early Modern England.
María Molina (Independent Scholar) Homes in Troubled times: Domesticity and Emotions in Granada during the Sixteenth Century.

Lunch 12.30-13.30

Session Two 13.30-15.00: Constructing the Domestic

Christina Farley (University of Cambridge) When Walls Talk: Liveliness in the Tudor Domestic Interior.
Samantha Chang (University of Toronto) Enter Stage Left: Stepping into the Seventeenth-Century Painter’s Studio.
Iman Sheeha (University of Warwick) Look in the place where he was wont to sit/ His Blood! It is too manifest:’ The House as Extension of Identity in The Tragedy of Master Arden of Faversham.

Tea Break 15.00-15.30

Session Three & Closing Remarks 15.30-16.30: Looking Forward: Historic Interiors in the Present Day

Gillian Draper (University of Kent) Show-rooms? The Nature and Impact of the Public Presentation of Historic Domestic Interiors Today.

Job: Research Associate / Post doc @ SACRIMA, LMU Munich

Institut für Kunstgeschichte, LMU München, February 1, 2017 – January
31, 2019
Application deadline: Dec 1, 2016

Jobs @ SACRIMA, The Normativity of Sacred Images in Early Modern
Europe, an interdisciplinary ERC funded project at the Institute for
Art History of the LMU in Munich
01.12.2016 um 00:00 Uhr

Research Associates / Post doc
Einrichtung: Fakultät für Geschichts- und Kunstwissenschaften
(Institut für Kunstgeschichte)
Besetzungsdatum: 01.02.2017
Ende der Bewerbungsfrist: 01.12.2016
Entgeltgruppe: 13 TV-L
Befristung: 2 Jahre

Es besteht grundsätzlich die Möglichkeit der Teilzeitbeschäftigung.

Die Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) ist eine der
renommiertesten und größten Universitäten Deutschlands.

Aufgaben

Applications are sought for up to two Research Associates
(Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter/in) on the new ERC funded project
SACRIMA, The Normativity of Sacred Images in Early Modern Europe led by
Professor Chiara Franceschini and based at the LMU Institute for Art
History. Applications from other disciplines are welcome.

We offer one to two post-doctoral positions of 2 years starting at the
earliest in February 2017. After a positive evaluation, each of the
contracts can be extended for one more year (a total of three years
maximum). The starting salary is in accordance with the requirements of
the LMU and depends on relevant research experience.

The project will study the normativity and the autonomy of art in
particular in the religious field in Early Modern Europe (circa
1450-1650). Bringing together researchers trained in the history of art
of different European areas as well as historians of religion, law and
cultural transfer, this interdisciplinary project will break ground in
two main ways. First, by questioning and developing the notion of
‘visual norm’ in a double sense: institutional norms imposed on images
and autonomous visual norms. Second, by adopting a comparative approach
at the crossroads of the history of art, the history of religion and
law, and cultural geography.

Focusing on a comparison between five major areas that, remaining
inside Catholicism, responded differently to the challenge imposed by
the Reformation, the project has the following stated objectives: 1) A
comparative survey of cases of contested images in the Italian
peninsula and islands, France, Iberia, the Low Countries and Southern
Germany. 2) An investigation of the notion of ‘visual norm’ (focusing
on aspects such as styles, iconographies, reproduction and reframing)
and a study of the status, the autonomy and the legal value of images.
3) An exploration of the geography of reactions to art transfer aiming
at reconstructing a cross-border cartography of visual norms in Europe
and the Mediterranean.

Anforderungen

You will have either a PhD in History of Art or in Early Modern History
and allied disciplines. You will have a background in areas of the
History of Art of the early modern period, preferably with a
specialization in Northern European and/or Iberian art (or in one of
the other areas of interests of the project), and/or in the early
modern religious history of Europe.

You will be expected to pursue independent work related to the themes
of SACRIMA focusing in particular on objectives 1 and 2 of the project
(see description above). The successful candidates are expected to work
as part of a team based in Munich and to spend up to four months in
each of the years of research on fieldwork and/or archive visits for
the case studies. They will publish the results of their research
within the publication programme of the project. You will be expected
to be involved in planning and running collaborative activities of the
project group (project meetings and seminars) as well as in some
administrative work associated with the project.
Experience with administration and coordination would be desirable as
well as an interest in archival research and/or the implementation of
digital tools connected with the project.

Working space, working tools and a travel budget will be provided.
Applications by researchers with handicap will be considered with
priority under equal conditions. We welcome applications from female
candidates. This is a full-time position. The possibility of part-time
and flexible working hours will be considered.

Wir bieten Ihnen eine interessante und verantwortungsvolle Tätigkeit
mit guten Weiterbildungs- und Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten.
Schwerbehinderte Bewerber / Bewerberinnen werden bei ansonsten im
Wesentlichen gleicher Eignung bevorzugt. Die Bewerbung von Frauen wird
begrüßt.
Bewerbungsadresse

How to apply:

Please send the following application materials as a single
PDF-document to Chiara.Franceschini@lmu.de (please specify SACRIMA in
your email subject line):
1. Short cover letter;
2. Short CV, including list of publications;
3. A description of your proposed research topic during the 2-year post
relating to the stated objectives of the SACRIMA project (max 1300
words, excluding bibliography);
4. A writing sample (e.g. one chapter of your latest paper or
publication). The writing sample should reflect your current research
interests; it does not need to have been already accepted for
publication and should preferably be no longer than 8000 words;
5. Names and contacts of at least two referees.

Applications received by December 1, 2016 will receive full
consideration. Review of the applications will continue until suitable
candidates are found. Shortlisted candidates will be invited for
interviews in mid December. Informal discussions with long-listed
candidates might be held via Skype on 6-7 December 2016. Informal
enquiries may be made to Prof. Dr. Chiara Franceschini.
Ansprechpartner/in

Prof. Dr. Chiara Franceschini
SACRIMA – The Normativity of Sacred Images in Early Modern Europe (ERC)
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Zentnerstraße 31
80798 München
Telefon: +49 (0)89 2180 3501 / Fax: +49 (089) / 2180-13507
E-Mail: Chiara.Franceschini@lmu.de

http://www.kunstgeschichte.uni-muenchen.de/aktuelles/franceschini-ausschreibung/index.html

New Publications: The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch

hmsah_77The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch: Imagining Antichrist and Others from the Middle Ages to the Reformation

Author: D.H. Strickland

Brepols Publishers

This study examines medieval Christian views of non-Christians and their changing political and theological significance as revealed in late-medieval and early-modern visual culture. Taking as her point of departure Hieronymus Bosch’s famous Epiphany triptych housed in the Prado Museum in Madrid, the author analyzes how representations of Jews, Saracens (later Turks), ‘Ethiopians’, and Mongols for centuries shaped western Christian attitudes towards salvation history, contemporary political conflicts, and the declining status of the Roman Church. She argues that Bosch’s innovative pictorial warning of the coming of Antichrist and the threat posed by non-Christians gained its power and authority through inter-visual references to the medieval past. Before and after Bosch, imaginative constructions that identified Jews and Turks with Gog and Magog, or the Pope with Antichrist, drew upon a long-established range of artistic and rhetorical strategies that artists and authors reconfigured as changing political circumstances demanded. Painted at a pivotal moment on the eve of the Reformation, the Prado Epiphany is a compelling lens through which to look backwards to the Middle Ages, and forwards to Martin Luther and the ideological significance of escalating Christian/non-Christian conflicts in the formation of the new Protestant church.

New Publications

svcma_11_lowViewing Greece: Cultural and Political Agency in the Medieval and Early Modern Mediterranean 

SEJ Gerstel (ed.)

Brepols Publishers

Multidisciplinary, geographically broad, and diachronic in scope, the papers in this volume consider the cultural and political agency of Greece as part of the late antique world, the Byzantine Empire, and the early modern Mediterranean.

 

Deriving from conferences, workshops, and lectures that took place in conjunction with “Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections,” an exhibition held at the National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, and Art Institute of Chicago from 2013 to 2015, the thirteen papers in this volume focus on the art, architecture, and topography of medieval and early modern Greece. Multidisciplinary, geographically broad, and diachronic in scope, these papers consider the cultural and political agency of Greece as part of the late antique world, the Byzantine Empire, and the early modern Mediterranean. The Greek lands—spread across island and mainland—are seen as parts of broad trade and political networks, as points of religious dynamism, and as regions that are simultaneously central and peripheral.  Cities and workshops, readings of monumental painting, approaches to sacred art, views of architecture and power, and printed images of the landscape are some of the main themes treated by the authors. The volume also includes reflections on the exhibition written by curators and critics.

SHARON E. J. GERSTEL is Professor of Byzantine Art and Archaeology at the University of California, Los Angeles. An art historian and archaeologist, her research focuses on the late Byzantine village and on the intersections of art and ritual. She is author of Beholding the Sacred Mysteries: Programs of the Byzantine Sanctuary (1999) and Rural Lives and Landscapes in Late Byzantium: Art, Archaeology and Ethnography (2015) and has edited numerous books including, most recently, Viewing the Morea: Land and People in the Late Medieval Peloponnese (Washington, DC, 2013).

Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

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Programme: IHR European history 1150-1550 Seminar, 2016–2017

Fortnightly Thursdays 17:30, IHR Wolfson II unless noted; free, all welcome

Winter Term
29th September ** Senate House South Block Room 349 (3rd Floor)**
Chris Wickham (Oxford): Jiangnan style: Doing global economic history in the medieval period

13th October
Giorgio Lizzul (KCL): The republic, commerce, and public debt in the forged orations of Doge Tommaso Mocenigo

Kenneth Duggan (KCL): The limits of strong government: Attempts to control criminality in thirteenth-century England

27th October (jointly with History of Liturgy seminar)
Cecilia Gaposchkin (Dartmouth & UCL): Liturgy and devotion in the aftermath of the FourthCrusade: Nivelon of Soissons, the relics of 1204, and the cathedral of Soissons

10th November
Andrew Jotischky (Royal Holloway): The image of the Greek: Western views of orthodox monks and monasteries, c.1000-1500

24th November
Nikolas Jaspert (Heidelberg): Military expatriation to Muslim lands: Aragonese Christian mercenaries as trans-imperial subjects in the Late Middle Ages

8th December (** Senate House Room 246 **)
Justine Firnhaber-Baker (St Andrews): Who were the Jacques and what did they want? Social networks and community mobilization in the Jacquerie of 1358

Spring Term 2017

18th January (jointly with Earlier Middle Ages Seminar, **time & venue to be confirmed**)
Roundtable discussion of Cathars in Question ed. Antonio Sennis (Boydell & Brewer, 2016)

19th January (** Senate House, The Court Room**)
Sylvain Piron (EHESS): An individual institutionalization: Opicino de Canestris (1296– c.1354)

2nd February
Nicholas Vincent (UEA): Henry II’s Irish colony: Truth and fiction

16th February
Dominique Iogna-Prat (CNRS/EHESS): A stone church? Visibility, monumentality and spatiality of the Medieval Church (500-1500)

2nd March
Ella Kilgallon (QMUL): Visualising castitas in the Franciscan tradition: An analysis of three frescoes from central Italy

Ella Williams (UCL): History and prophecy in Naples: The Faits des Romains at the court of KingRobert ‘the Wise’

16th March
Jonathan Lyon (Chicago): Offices, officials and bureaucracy in late medieval Europe: The view from Germany

Convenors: David Carpenter (KCL), Matthew Champion (Birkbeck), Johanna Dale (UCL), David d’Avray (UCL), Serena Ferente (KCL), Andrew Jotischky (RHUL), Patrick Lantschner (UCL), Cornelia Linde (German Historical Institute), Sophie Page (UCL), Eyal Poleg (QMUL), Miri Rubin (QMUL), John Sabapathy (UCL), Alex Sapoznik (KCL), Alice Taylor (KCL); IHR page http://www.history.ac.uk/events/seminars/114.

Contact: John Sabapathy & Alice Taylor (j.sabapathy@ucl.ac.uk & alice.taylor@kcl.ac.uk).