Tag Archives: Byzantine Art

6 CfP for ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

[1] Venice, Materiality, and the Byzantine World

[2] De-Centering the Romanesque

[3] Creative Modes of Activating the Early Medieval Manuscript

[4] Creative Strategies of Intellectual Engagement with Tradition and the Auctores

[5] “Manuscripts in the Curriculum”: New Perspectives on Using Medieval Manuscripts in the Undergraduate Classroom from Special Collection Librarians, Faculty, and Booksellers (A Roundtable)

[6] Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

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[1]

Venice, Materiality, and the Byzantine World

Sponsored by the Italian Art Society, 

Deadline: Sep 15, 2017

The Dumbarton Oaks Byzantine Symposium leading to the 2010 publication of San Marco, Byzantium, and the Myths of Venice introduced new perspectives on Byzantine and Venetian visual and material culture that extended Otto Demus’s survey of Saint Mark’s basilica. The authors’ application of more recent approaches—such as the social function of spolia, the act of display, the construction of identity, and cultural hybridity—brought fresh analyses to a complex and richly decorated monument. This panel seeks to expand this methodological discourse by taking into account questions related to materials, materiality, and intermediality between Venice and Byzantium. The arrival of material culture from the Byzantine world to Venice as gifts, spoils, or ephemera during the centuries surrounding the Fourth Crusade allowed for both appropriation and conceptual transformation of material culture. In light of the renewal in interest of Venice’s Byzantine heritage, this panel seeks to reflect on the interaction of material culture between la Serenissima and the Byzantine world, especially during the eleventh through fifteenth centuries. Topics may be wide-ranging, including, but not limited to: issues of reception and cultural translation; changing concepts of preciousness; different valuation of materials between Venice and Byzantium; the fluctuating simulation of material visual effects; the transformation of Byzantine objects incorporated into Venetian frames; intermedial dialogue between Byzantine and Venetian art; and the process and technique of manufacture of works between Byzantium and Venice. Some points of departure may include: the building of San Marco itself; Byzantine objects in the Treasury; Byzantine manuscripts included as part of the Cardinal Bessarion gift to the Republic; the monuments on Torcello; or issues raised as a result of recent conservation projects. New cross-cultural methodologies from art historical, anthropological, or sociological fields are welcome.
Please submit a 300-word abstract and a completed Participant 
Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) by 

September 15 to the session organizers:

Brad Hostetler, Kenyon College, hostetler1@kenyon.edu, Joseph Kopta, Pratt Institute, jkopta@pratt.edu
In addition to the travel awards available to all Congress participants (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/awards), the Italian Art Society offers competitive travel grants: http://italianartsociety.org/grants-opportunities/travel-grant-information/

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[2]

De-Centering the Romanesque

Dommuseum Hildesheim & The J. Paul Getty Museum

The canonical emphasis of Romanesque studies on regional centers and monuments has overshadowed aspects of transregional exchange that defined the art and culture of medieval western Europe circa 1000-1250. One of the key characteristics of this period is movement — of peoples, ideas, and materials. This session will explore the themes of portability and exchange, with possible topics addressing Mediterranean and Baltic trade networks, transcultural objects in the western treasuries, pseudo-scripts and their varied meanings, and hoards versus monuments. Participants are encouraged to address the concept of nexus versus center and the pedagogical implications for presenting a de-centered and global Romanesque, with papers that either challenge or affirm the Romanesque frame for teaching medieval art, both in the classroom and in the museum.

Please send your proposal of up to one page with your Participant Information Form (PIF) http://wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html#PIF to the organizers: Kristen Collins, J. Paul Getty Museum, KCollins@getty.edu or Gerhard Lutz, Dommuseum Hildesheim, gerhard.lutz@dommuseum-hildesheim.de

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[3] and [4]

Deadline: Sep 1, 2017

Two sessions for, “Identifying Creative Impulses in Early Medieval Art and Culture,” will convene at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, MI.

Papers are solicited that encourage novel—even experimental—approaches, to the exploration and identification of various conceptions of early medieval, creative cultural activity. 

The first panel seeks to engage with the actual haptic and experiential practice of manufacturing, reading and studying the early medieval book.

The second panel focuses upon culturally apposite forms of interpretative and compositional fashioning that can be discerned in manuscripts belonging to the liberal arts traditions of the Early Middle Ages.

Abstracts and paper proposals of not more than 250 words can be submitted via email on or before September 1, 2017 to the session organizers: Eric Ramírez-Weaver (emr6m@virginia.edu) and Lynley Anne Herbert (lherbert@thewalters.org). Please copy both co-organizers when submitting a proposal, posing a question, or requesting additional information via email.

Complete panel descriptions follow. We particularly encourage inventive strategies promising new approaches to the investigation of early medieval creativity.

Identifying Creative Impulses in Early Medieval Art and Culture
Special Sessions organized by Eric Ramírez-Weaver (emr6m@virginia.edu) and Lynley Anne Herbert (lherbert@thewalters.org)

I. Creative Modes of Activating the Early Medieval Manuscript

The way a manuscript behaves when used “in the flesh,” so to speak, can at times reveal layers of creativity built into them, which must be actively experienced rather than passively seen. Often as modern scholars we work from digitized images of individual folios, or at best openings, and “page flipping” technologies (such as the Walters’s “Ex Libris” platform or the British Library’s “Turning the Pages” program) provide a false sense that we are experiencing the physical book. Evidence of the performative qualities of a manuscript can at times be rediscovered, not just in the sense of how a reader might perform the text written in the book, but how the user activated the book as an object during use. Does an image show through a page and become part of the visual experience on the other side, and was there intentionality there? Do images interact across an opening? Does imagery function together from recto to verso? How is the artist creating an experience for the user, or conversely, how did the user alter the book to create a personal experience? This session seeks papers that explore creative approaches that open up new possibilities regarding how early medieval manuscripts functioned as objects.
II. Creative Strategies of Intellectual Engagement with Tradition and the Auctores

Recent scholarship (consider Benjamin Anderson, Lynda Coon, Paul Edward Dutton, Rosamond McKitterick, Lawrence Nees, Eric Ramírez-Weaver, and Immo Warntjes), has increasingly emphasized the creative strategies for intervention and manufacture of meaning that were acutely linked to early medieval eastern and western engagements with various aspects of the liberal art traditions. From star pictures to poetic acrostics, devotion to erudition and pious personal reform transformed the possibilities for innovation that proliferated during the Carolingian period. Interlocking networks of artists, chroniclers, historians, and poets communicated their translations, textual redactions, and visual records of classical tradition and contemporary study with one another, engaged in debate or collaboration, but advancing science. This session seeks papers willing to reconsider methodologically apposite ways to reinterpret the various brands of early medieval creativity manifest in texts pertaining (as broadly as possible) to the seven liberal arts, including texts of astronomical, computistical, rhetorical, geometric, arithmetic, musical, lyrical, philosophical, diagrammatic, or historical significance.

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[5]

“Manuscripts in the Curriculum”: New Perspectives on Using Medieval Manuscripts in the Undergraduate Classroom from Special Collection Librarians, Faculty, and Booksellers (A Roundtable)

Deadline: Sep 10, 2017

Integrating medieval manuscripts into an undergraduate curriculum changes the game. Students are transformed from passive learners to active scholars; observing objects and seeking to understand and interpret their context teaches critical thinking. Implementing programs to give students this opportunity requires the cooperation of special collection librarians and faculty, two disciplines that speak slightly different languages. Inspired by Les Enluminures’s new program Manuscripts in the Curriculum<http://www.textmanuscripts.com/curatorial-services/manuscripts&gt;, this session will also introduce a third perspective and explore the practical issues of how to build collections for teaching.

The session organizers wish to bring people together from these communities to share their experiences, to discuss successful results, to analyze problems, and to envision future directions. We invite papers that explore efforts to bring manuscripts into the classroom, and the challenges of implementing these programs at specific institutions from the perspectives of librarians, faculty, and booksellers. The session will be structured as a roundtable with a series of short ten- and fifteen-minute papers (the number and duration to be determined depending on response), with ample time for discussion.

Please send abstracts of no more than a page, along with a current CV and the Participation Information Form (available on the Medieval Congress Submissions page: http://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to lauralight@lesenluminures.com<mailto:lauralight@lesenluminures.com> by September 10, and sooner if possible.
Emily Runde, Text Manuscripts Specialist

Les Enluminures

http://www.lesenluminures.com&lt;http://www.lesenluminures.com&gt;

http://www.textmanuscripts.com&lt;http://www.textmanuscripts.com&gt;
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[6]

Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

Deadline: Sep 10, 2017

(Courtauld Institute of Art) and Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne). Deadline: 10 September 2017

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artefacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts. For more information visit: http://www.medievalart.org/kress-travel-grant/

Lectureship in Classics (Roman Art) (Including Late Antique/Early Byzantine art to c. 700 AD), School of Human Environment, University College Cork, Ireland

logo-web-englishJob: Lectureship in Classics (Roman Art), Including Late Antique/Early Byzantine art to c. 700 AD), School of Human Environment, University College Cork, Ireland
Deadline: 5pm, 01 November 2016

Contract Type: Permanent Whole-Time
Job Type: Academic
Salary: €31,821 – €56,967/€62,353 – €76,942

UCC wishes to appoint an experienced academic to the role of Lecturer in Classics (Roman Art).  Reporting to the Head of the Department of Classics, the Lecturer in Classics (Roman Art) will have a specialist interest in Roman Art, broadly understood to include Late Antique Art. The successful applicant will be required to deliver foundation and advanced teaching on aspects of Roman Art from the early Republican to the Late Antique periods, with an emphasis on art of the Imperial period. An ability to teach a classical language (Greek or Latin) is desirable, but not essential. The successful candidate may be required to teach in other areas of classical culture or history according to changing departmental needs. Candidates must hold a doctoral qualification in an area of Roman, or Late Antique, Art from a recognised University at the time of application. The holder of this post will be expected to promote student research at masters and doctoral level on different aspects of Roman Art. S/he will also be required to contribute to the academic administration of the department and college, and to engage with external bodies in areas relating to Classics.

Please note that Garda vetting and/or an international police clearance check may form part of the selection process.

How to apply: For an information package including full details of the post, selection criteria and application process see www.ucc.ie/hr/vacancies.  The University, at its discretion, may undertake to make an additional appointment(s) from this competition following the conclusion of the process.

Informal enquiries can be made in confidence to Dr. David Woods, Tel: 0035321-4903491, Email: d.woods@ucc.ie.  Further information on the Department is available at: http://www.ucc.ie/en/classics/.

Appointment may be made on the Lectureship Salary Scale: €31,821 – €56,967/€62,353 – €76,942.

To Apply:

Candidates should apply, in confidence, before 5pm on Tuesday 1st November 2016 by emailing a completed application form to recruitment@ucc.ie.

 

 

CFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era

palaiologos-to-deleteCFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era, One day and a half Symposium & Worshop, University of Birmingham, February, 24-25, 2017.
Deadline: 30 September 2016

 

Organisers: Andrea Mattiello – University of Birmingham
Maria Alessia Rossi – The Courtauld Institute of Art

Keynote Speakers: Niels Gaul – University of Edinburgh
Cecily Hilsdale – McGill University
Angeliki Lymberopoulou – The Open University

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire, such as the Adriatic and Balkan regions, the major islands of Cyprus and Crete, and the regions surrounding the cities of Constantinople, Thessaloniki, and Mystras. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

In its last centuries, the political entity of the Empire of the Romaioi released cultural and artistic energies migrating towards new frontiers of intellectual achievements. The intent is to counter-balance the innovation of these works of art with the notion of decline and the narrative of decay frequently acknowledged for this period; and to promote an understanding of transformation where previous cultural heritages were integrated into new socio-political orders.

The Symposium – hosted on the afternoon of the 24 and the morning of the 25 February – will bring together established scholars, early-career scholars, and postgraduate students. Three keynotes will provide the methodological framework for the discussion; while the selected papers will focus solely on the visual expressions and cultural trajectories of the artworks produced during the late Palaiologan Era.

The Workshop, hosted on the afternoon of the 25 February, will offer the opportunity to further the discussion in a more informal setting and for a selected number of Master students to interact and offer brief presentations.

Postgraduate students and early-career scholars are invited to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers on art and architecture history, material culture and archaeology, visual aspects of palaeography and codicology, and gender studies.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

 

– Gift exchange in view of diplomatic missions or dynastic marriages both within the Empire and with its neighbours

– Visual evidence of the interaction between the Emperor and the Patriarch

– Innovations in the visual agenda of the Palaiologan dynasty

– Aspects of religious iconography and visual representations of theological controversies, i.e. Hesychasm

– Artistic patronage and manuscript production as the outcome of dynastic and institutional interactions

– Visual and material production as the outcome of political and social circumstances, i.e. the Zealot uprising or the Unionist policy

– Evidence of artistic exchanges in the depictions of women, men, and children during the Palaiologan Era

 

How to submit: Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello – axm570@bham.ac.uk by 30 September 2016.

 

CFP: Reconsidering the Concept of Decline and the Arts of the Palaiologan Era (University of Birmingham)

Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 10.01.01 AM

 

 

 

 

Deadline: 30 September 2016

One day and a half Symposium & Workshop

24 and 25 February 2017, held at the University of Birmingham

This one day and a half conference combines a symposium and a workshop. The aim is to examine and contextualise the artistic and cultural production of the geopolitical centres that were controlled by or in contact with the late Byzantine Empire, such as the Adriatic and Balkan regions, the major islands of Cyprus and Crete, and the regions surrounding the cities of Constantinople, Thessaloniki, and Mystras. This conference will explore the many intellectual implications that are encoded in the innovative artistic production of the Palaiologan Era often simplified by a rigid understanding of what is Byzantine and what is not.

In its last centuries, the political entity of the Empire of the Romaioi released cultural and artistic energies migrating towards new frontiers of intellectual achievements. The intent is to counter-balance the innovation of these works of art with the notion of decline and the narrative of decay frequently acknowledged for this period; and to promote an understanding of transformation where previous cultural heritages were integrated into new socio-political orders.

The Symposium – hosted on the afternoon of the 24 and the morning of the 25February – will bring together established scholars, early-career scholars, and postgraduate students. Three keynotes will provide the methodological framework for the discussion; while the selected papers will focus solely on the visual expressions and cultural trajectories of the artworks produced during the late Palaiologan Era.

The Workshop, hosted on the afternoon of the 25 February, will offer the opportunity to further the discussion in a more informal setting and for a selected number of Master students to interact and offer brief presentations.

Postgraduate students and early-career scholars are invited to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers on art and architecture history, material culture, visual aspects of palaeography and codicology, and gender studies.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Gift exchange in view of diplomatic missions or dynastic marriages both within the Empire and with its neighbours
  • Visual evidence of the interaction between the Emperor and the Patriarch
  • Innovations in the visual agenda of the Palaiologan dynasty
  • Aspects of religious iconography and visual representations of theological controversies, i.e. Hesychasm
  • Artistic patronage and manuscript production as the outcome of dynastic and institutional interactions
  • Visual and material production as the outcome of political and social circumstances, i.e. the Zealot uprising or the Unionist policy
  • Evidence of artistic exchanges in the depictions of women, men, and children during the Palaiologan Era

 

Titles of proposed papers, abstracts of 250 words, and a short CV should be sent to Maria Alessia Rossi – m.alessiarossi@icloud.com and Andrea Mattiello –axm570@bham.ac.uk

Organisers: Andrea Mattiello – University of Birmingham
Maria Alessia Rossi – The Courtauld Institute of Art

Symposium: The 49th Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies (18–20 March 2016)

csm_Epigraphy_86843da101Inscribing Texts in Byzantium: Continuities & Transformations

Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies

Exeter College, Oxford, 18–20 March 2016

In spite of the striking abundance of extant primary material – over 4000 Greek texts produced in the period between the sixth and fifteenth centuries – Byzantine Epigraphy remains largely uncharted territory, with a reputation for being elusive and esoteric that obstinately persists. References to inscriptions in our texts show how ubiquitous and deeply engrained the epigraphic habit was in Byzantine society, and underscore the significance of epigraphy as an auxiliary discipline. The SPBS Symposium 2016 has invited specialists in the field to examine diverse epigraphic material in order to trace individual epigraphic habits, and outline overall inscriptional traditions. In addition to the customary format of panel papers and shorter communications, the Symposium will organize a round table, whose participants will lead a debate on the topics presented in the panel papers, and discuss the methodological questions of collection, presentation and interpretation of Byzantine inscriptional material.

Registration and Booking:

Early registration available until 1 March 2016.

Please book using the University of Oxford’s online booking form.

Program:

Friday 18 March:

10:00: Registration, Coffee

11:00: OPENING ADDRESS: Cyril Mango

11:30: PANEL ONE: Collecting and Reading Inscriptions in Byzantium
Marc Lauxtermann: Collecting Inscriptions in Byzantium
Foteini Spingou:  Reading Inscriptions in Byzantium
13:00: Lunch

14:00: PANEL TWO: Traditions and Transitions

Anne McCabe: Traditions and Transitions in Early Byzantine Constantinopolitan Material
Sylvain Destephen: The Process of ‘Byzantinization’ in Late Antique Anatolian Epigraphy
Sean Leatherbury: Reading, Viewing and Inscribing Faith: Christian Epigraphy in the Early Umayyad Levant
16:00: Tea

16:30: PANEL THREE: Seventh-century Epigraphy Three Ways

Ida Toth: Epigraphy and Byzantine Writing Culture
Ine Jacobs: Epigraphy and Archaeology
Marek Jankowiak: Epigraphy and History
09:00: COMMUNICATIONS 1 (download abstracts for all communications here)

Fabian Stroth: Space Oddity: The Sts. Sergios and Bakchos Epigram Read Through its Manufacturing Process
Pamela Armstrong: Dipinto Inscriptions on Architectural Ceramics
Jim Crow: Lost and Found. Two inscriptions from Eastern Thrace from the District of Karacaköy
Paschalis Androudis: Byzantine Inscriptions on the Marble Cornices of the Church of Profitis Ilias in Thessaloniki
10:00: Coffee

10:30: PANEL FOUR: Place, Placement, Paratextuality

Andreas Rhoby: Inscriptions and the Byzantine Beholder: The Question of the Perception of Script
Niels Gaul: Epigraphic Majuscules and Marginalia: Paratextual ‘Inscriptions’ in Byzantine Manuscripts
Brad Hostetler: Towards a Typology for the Placement of Names on Works of Art
12:30: Lunch

13:30: PANEL FIVE: The (In)formality of the Inscribed Word

Maria Xenaki: The (In)formality of the Inscribed Word at the Parthenon: Script, Content and Legibility
Nicholas Melvani: State, Strategy, and Ideology in Monumental Imperial Inscription
Alexandra Vassiliou-Seibt: The Evaluation of the Inscribed Word on Seals
15:30: Tea

16:00: PANEL SIX: The Material Turn

Georgios Pallis: The House of Inscriptions. The Epigraphic World of the Middle Byzantine Church and its Significance
Ivan Drpic: Short Texts on Small Objects: The Poetics of the Byzantine Enkolpion
17:30-18:30: Reception

18:30-19:30: SPBS Exec meeting

20:00: Dinner

09:00: COMMUNICATIONS 2
Sukanya Raisharma: Reading Early Texts and Codices as Epigraphical Evidence
Arkadii Avdokhin: Inscriptions Imagined and Narrated – Textual Evidence for the Perspective of the Viewer on Early Byzantine Epigraphy
Antonio Felle: Some Examples of Funerary Non-exposed Writings (Italy and Byzantium between VI and IX centuries)
Eileen Rubery: Making and Meaning in the Inscriptions Found in the Frescoes in the Church of Santa Maria Antiqua in the Roman Forum (600-800 AD)
Maria Lidova: Word of Image: Textual Frames of Early Byzantine Icons
Emmanuel Moutafov: Epigraphy and Art: Corpora of Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Monumental Painting in Bulgaria. Is Epigraphy an Auxiliary Discipline?

09:00: COMMUNICATIONS 3
Georgios Deligiannakis: Epigraphy and Early Monasticism
Pawel Nowakowski: The Cult of Saints Database as an Instrument of Study for the Cult of Saints in Anatolia
Efthymios Rizos: The Emperor and the Great Shrines of the Empire: The Testimony of Inscribed Imperial Pronouncements
Mirela Ivanova: Krum’s Triumphal Inscriptions and the Community in Early Medieval Bulgaria (c. 803-14)
Archie Dunn: Institutions, Socio-economic Groups, and Urban Change in the Sigillographic Inscriptions of Byzantine Corinth
Christos Stavrakos: Epigraphy as a Source for Rare Iconography and the Society of Lakedaimon in the Late Byzantine period

10:30: Coffee and SPBS Annual General Meeting

11:30: ROUND TABLE: SPBS Debate on Byzantine Epigraphy (Chair: Elizabeth Jeffreys)

Dennis Feissel
Charlotte Roueche
Marlia Mango
Scott Redford
Sophia Kalopissi-Verti
Tony Eastmond

For more information see: http://www.byzantium.ac.uk/events/spring-symposium-2016.html

Lecturer in History of Art and Architecture (Late Roman and Byzantine): Closing Date 22nd Jan

Lecturer in History of Art and Architecture (Late Roman and Byzantine)

School of History and Heritage

Location:  Brayford
Salary:   From £31,656 per annum
Closing Date:   Friday 22 January 2016
Interview Date:   Monday 08 February 2016
Reference:  COA151

The School of History and Heritage is based in the College of Arts, located at the University’s main Brayford campus beside a natural pool in the River Witham with a view dominated by the magnificent Cathedral. School teaching and research staff currently represent the disciplines of history and conservation and deliver a portfolio of undergraduate and taught postgraduate degrees.

History is taught as an undergraduate BA, and there are also two thriving taught MA programmes in History and Medieval Studies and a growing number of postgraduate research students.  There is a strong and growing team of historians with particular strengths in medieval, Mediterranean, gender and 20th century political and cultural history. The team performed well in REF 2014 with 35% of outputs rated 4*. Lincoln is one of the few UK universities to offer BA and MA degrees in conservation and the School also houses Crick Smith, a leading practice in the conservation, restoration and research of historic buildings and artefacts.

The successful candidate will expand and strengthen our expertise by bringing a developing research profile and established teaching record in the history of late Roman and Byzantine art and architecture. She or he will help in developing links between history and conservation within the School of History and Heritage.

The successful candidate will play a key role in the School’s curriculum development, notably in advancing plans to introduce additional modules in visual and material culture and to develop a programme in the history of art and architecture. She or he will hold a teaching qualification in HE or have received HEA recognition.

Lincoln is a wonderful city for a historians of art and architecture, boasting structures dating from the Roman and medieval periods until today, including Britain’s finest cathedral and a recently-restored Norman castle.  There are excellent local museums and galleries, archives spanning the medieval to the modern period. Applicants invited for interview will be asked to offer a presentation on how resources found in Lincoln will inform their teaching at level 2.

There is a strong collaborative research culture within the school with regular seminars and ongoing support for research activity, including funding for research and conference activities and a research leave scheme.

Grants: Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture (deadline 2 February 2016)

demetroThe Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture is pleased to announce its 2016-2017 grant competition. Our grants reflect the Mary Jaharis Center’s commitment to fostering the field of Byzantine studies through the support of graduate students and early career researchers and faculty.
Mary Jaharis Center Dissertation Development Grants target graduate students who have completed all coursework, language requirements, and exams necessary to advance to Ph.D. candidacy. Grants are meant to assist with the costs of travel associated with the development of a dissertation proposal in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived, e.g., travel to potential research sites, museum collections, research and special collections libraries. The goal of these grants is to assist students in refining their initial ideas into a feasible, interesting, and fundable doctoral project.
Mary Jaharis Center Dissertation Grants are awarded to advanced graduate students working on Ph.D. dissertations in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. These grants are meant to help defray the costs of research-related expenses, e.g., travel, photography/digital images, microfilm.
Mary Jaharis Center Publication Grants support book-length publications or major articles in the field of Byzantine studies broadly conceived. Grants are aimed at early career academics. Preference will be given to postdocs and assistant professors, though applications from non-tenure track faculty and associate and full professors will be considered. We encourage the submission of first-book projects.
The application deadline for all grants is February 2, 2016. For further information, please see http://maryjahariscenter.org/grants/.
Contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center, with any questions.