Tag Archives: oxford

Conference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford, Saturday 18th November 2017

astonomytodeleteConference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford – Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, Saturday 18th November 2017

10.30 am – 5.00 pm

The celestial sky has been a source of fascination since ancient times with astronomy being the oldest of the natural sciences. During the medieval period, astronomy flourished in many cultures across the world, some of which followed on from earlier models created by Ptolemy. The motions of the celestial bodies were investigated, early astronomical observatories were built and some cultures constructed remarkable monuments inspired by astronomical insights. This conference will draw together the different strands of medieval astronomy from across the world and will examine how they interfaced and paved the way for the scientific developments later in the Renaissance.

Registration to attend this conference is free, but must be confirmed using the Conference booking form by midday on Friday 10th November 2017.

Confirmed speakers include:

Dr Giles Gasper (Durham University) – `The Service of Astronomy’ – European Star-Gazing and Its Implications in the Middle Ages

Professor Christopher Cullen (University of Cambridge) – Chinese Astronomy in a World Context

Dr Josep Casulleras (University of Barcelona) – From Ancient to Modern: Astronomy in Medieval Islam

Professor Ivan Šprajc (Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts) – Mayan and Aztec Astronomy: Skywatching in Prehispanic Mesoamerica

Dr Benno van Dalen (Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities) – Ptolemaic Astronomy and Its Dissemination in the Islamic World, Europe and Asia

There will be a conference dinner at St Cross in the evening following the end of the conference with an after-dinner talk by Dr Valerie Shrimplin (Gresham College) on the influence of astronomy and the cosmos on medieval art. Although the conference itself is free of charge, the dinner carries a cost of £35 to attend – booking a place for dinner can be done here.

For more information see the website: https://www.stx.ox.ac.uk/happ/events/astronomy-across-medieval-world-one-day-conference

 

Advertisements

Last conference places: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650

quadfromgateConference: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650, residential conference at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 6-9 September 2017
Register by 3 September

Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded on humanistic principles in 1517.  Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the long sixteenth century, Corpus was a major centre of learning and religion: it played host to the Spanish humanist, Juan Luis Vives and the German astronomer and mathematician, Nicholas Kratzer; its fellows included the Catholic reformer Reginald Pole and the Protestant thinkers John Jewel and Richard Hooker; it played a prominent part in the production of the King James Bible.  In the College’s 500th anniversary year, we are holding a conference to discuss the wider context and implications of this remarkable foundation, exploring the inter-connected worlds of learning and education, prelacy and public service, charity and communal life, religion, literature and the arts, in Oxford and beyond, during a two hundred-year period of Renaissance and Reformation.

The programme includes papers from Susan Brigden, Clive Burgess, Jeremy Catto, Paul Cavill, Alexandra Gajda, Anthony Grafton, Lucy Kaufman, Nicholas Hardy, Pamela King, Julian Reid, Richard Rex, Miri Rubin, David Rundle, Christopher Stray, Joanna Weinberg, Magnus Williamson, and William Whyte.  A round table of Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Heal and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by Keith Thomas, will bring proceedings to a close.

Details are available here: Conference Programme.

Booking is now open: please click here Renaissance College Conference.

If you have any questions about your booking, please feel free to contact kerry.atkinson@ccc.ox.ac.uk.  For any queries about the content of the conference, please contact john.watts@ccc.ox.ac.uk.

 

CfP: Gender & Medieval Studies Conference 2018, University of Oxford

GENDER AND MEDIEVAL STUDIES CONFERENCE 2018GENDER, IDENTITY, ICONOGRAPHY:

CALL FOR PAPERS

Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford

8th-10th January 2018

The glittering beauty of the Alfred Jewel, the rich illustration of the Lindisfarne Gospels, the dominating Great West Window of York Minster, the intricate embroidery of the Bayeux Tapestry, the luminous Maestà of Duccio, the opulent Oseberg ship burial, and the sophisticated imagery of the Ruthwell cross are all testament to the centrality of the visual to our understanding of a range of medieval cultures.

Constructed at and across the intersections of race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, national identity, age, social class, and economic status, gendered medieval identities are multiple, mobile, and multivalent. Iconography – both religious and secular – plays a key role in the representation of such multifaceted identities. But visual symbols do not merely represent personhood. Across the range of medieval media, visual symbolism is used actively to produce, inscribe, and express the gendered identities of both individuals and groups.

The 2018 Gender and Medieval Studies Conference welcomes papers on all aspects of gender, identity and iconography from those working on medieval subjects in any discipline.

Papers may address, but are not limited to:

· Sight and Blindness

· Visible and Invisible Identities

· Visual Languages

· Colour and Shade

· Icons and Iconoclasm

· Light and Darkness

· Collective and Individual Identities

· Orthodox and Heretical imagery

· Aesthetics

· Subject and Motif

· Convention and Innovation

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please email proposals of approx. 200 words to gmsconference2018@gmail.com by Monday 4 September 2017. We will also consider proposals for alternative kinds of presentation, including full panel proposals, performance and art; please contact the organisers to discuss.

A conference for everyone

Corpus Christi College’s auditorium is fully wheelchair accessible, has accessible toilets, and features a hearing loop for those using hearing aids. Please contact us if you have specific accessibility needs you would like to discuss. We plan to provide a private lactation space.

It is hoped that the Kate Westoby Fund will be able to offer a modest contribution towards (but not the full costs of) as many postgraduate student travel expenses as possible. We are exploring other avenues to make the conference financially feasible for postgraduates and early career scholars to attend.

CFP: Authority beyond the Law: Traditional and Charismatic Authority in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Ioannou Centre, Oxford, 3 December 2016

corona ferreaCall for papers: Authority beyond the Law: Traditional and Charismatic Authority in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Ioannou Centre, Oxford, 3 December 2016.
Deadline: 16th September 2016.

In Economy and Society, Max Weber theorised three ideal types of authority: charismatic, traditional and legal. While legal authority has been well-explored in modern scholarship and most resembles the structures of authority in our own world, more recent work has indicated the importance of the charismatic and traditional ideal types as lenses for viewing Ancient and Medieval authority. Thus, in his 2016 monograph, Dynasties, Jeroen Duindam stresses the importance of charisma to royal power, exploring the pageantry of power, ritual actions undertaken to safeguard the harvest or control the weather, and the personal delivery of justice, while Kate Cooper, especially in The Fall of the Roman Household, has argued that power in the ancient world was inseparably linked to individual households in a way similar to Weber’s theorising of traditional authority, making the (late) Roman ‘state’ seem significantly smaller than it has tended to before.

By bringing together scholars of many different periods and contexts, we intend to explore the value of Weber’s traditional and charismatic types for understanding changes, continuities and complexities in the construction of authority across Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Submissions might consider the following themes:

  • The use of the irrational and supernatural as a basis of authority
  • Ways that charismatic authority perpetuated itself without the creation of legal authority
  • The interactions between charisma and tradition within individual contexts
  • The use of traditional and charismatic authority legitimise law and legal instruments (rather than vice versa)
  • Status groups’ use of appeals to time-honoured rights and the distant past to legitimate their authority
  • The use of tradition and charisma by heretics and rebels to construct their own authority and delegitimise that of their opponents
  • The applicability of Weber’s typology to non-political authority and to the authority of places and objects
  • The influence of ideas about the ancient and Medieval worlds on sociological thought about authority (and vice versa)

Publication of some or all of the papers may be sought as a themed journal issue.

Submission: We welcome graduate students and early career researchers in Classics, Medieval Studies and other disciplines to submit abstracts of 20 minute papers to authoritybeyondthelaw@gmail.com by the 16th September 2016.

CFP: After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443-1517

St. Anne’s College, Oxford, 28-30 June 2017

An international conference organised by the Faculty of English, University of Oxford, this event builds on the success of the 2009 Oxford conference, After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England, which resulted in a book of essays (ed. by Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh) that vigorously interrogated the nature of religious and intellectual culture in England in the long fifteenth century. After Chichele adopts a similar investigative and interdisciplinary approach. The period has been chosen precisely because the inner workings of English intellectual and religious life during these years have proved challengingly resistant to the formation of grand critical narratives. What are the chief currents driving the intellectual and cultural life of the church in England during this period? What happened to intellectual questioning during the period, and where did the Church’s cultural life express itself most vividly? What significant parochial, regional, national and international influences were brought to bear on English literate practices? In order to address these questions, the conference will adopt an interdisciplinary focus, inviting contributions from historians, literary scholars, and scholars working on the theology, ecclesiastical history, music and art of the period, and it is expected that a wide range of literary and cultural artefacts will be considered, from single-authored works to manuscript compilations, from translations to original works, and from liturgy to art and architecture, with no constraints as to the conference’s likely outcomes and conclusions. It is intended that the conference should generate a volume of essays similar to After Arundel in scope, ambition and quality.

Plenary speakers: David Carlson, Mary Erler, Sheila Lindenbaum, Julian Luxford, David Rundle, Cathy Shrank.

Possible topics for discussion:
Religious writing and the English Church; the emergence of humanism and the fate of scholasticism; literature and the law; cultural and ecclesiastical patronage; developments in art and architecture; the liturgical life of the Church; the impact of the international book trade and of print; palaeography and codicology; the Church’s role in education, colleges and chantries; the impact of travel and pilgrimage.

Please send 500 word abstracts (for proposed 20-minute papers) by Friday, 12th August 2016 to Vincent Gillespie, Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford OX2 6QA (vincent.gillespie@ell.ox.ac.uk).

BAA Romanesque conference 2016: Saints, Shrines and Pilgrimage (Oxford, 4-6 April 2016)

BAARomanesqueconference2016

UPDATE: BOOKING NOW AVAILABLE.

The British Archaeological Association will hold its fourth biennial International Romanesque conference in Oxford on 4-6 April, 2016. The theme is Romanesque: Saints, Shrines and Pilgrimage, and the aim is to examine the material culture of sanctity over the period c.950-c.1200. The Conference will be held at Rewley House in Oxford from 4-6 April, 2016, with the opportunity to stay on for two days of visits to Romanesque buildings on 7-8 April.

We wish to encourage contributions on a number of broad themes, which we have provisionally grouped under three headings.

The Geographies of Sanctity. This covers architecture and archaeology, but in addition to the development of spaces for reliquary display and studies of individual sites, we would be interested in papers concerned with the provision of accommodation for pilgrims, saints as protectors of cities, and the phenomenon of substitute holy places and vicarious pilgrimage.

Cults and Reliquaries. How were cults promoted through reliquaries, and how might reliquaries be designed to draw attention to the particular attributes, virtues or miracle-working character of individual saints? We would be interested in papers on sites where objects help to define a cult, and papers that discuss how the promotion of a cult through manuscripts, monumental painting or sculpture may have changed during the period.

New Saints and New Orders. We would welcome papers on the new saints of the 11th and 12th centuries, and papers that touch on the attitudes of the new monastic orders towards saints and pilgrimage, as well as the infrastructure that these provide (particularly the Templars and Hospitallers), the sanctification of their founders, and the revival of earlier cults.

Proposals for papers of up to 30 minutes in length should be sent to the conference convenors, John McNeill and Richard Plant, at jsmcneill@btinternet.com, by 15 May

Lectures: Late Antique and Byzantine Archaeology and Art Seminar, Oxford

Trinity Term 2014, Thursdays 11-12:30
St John’s College, New Seminar Room

images1 May   Prof. Wolfgang Hahn (University of Vienna; OCBR Visiting Professor), Some remarks on the Byzantine issues of the Roman mint during the 8th century
8 May   Prof. Andrew Wilson (All Souls), The nymphs and palms of late Roman Aphrodisias
15 May  Dr. Anne McCabe (CSAD), Equestrian sports in and near the Great Palace at Constantinople:  Part 1
22 May  Agnieszka Lic (St Cross),   The mosque at Sobata/Shivta in the Negev in the context of Muslim-Christian relations in Bilad al-Sham in the early Islamic period.
29 May  Dr Simon Davies, From statue to ‘relief icon’: transition in medieval Byzantine sculpture
5 June  Prof. Elizabeta Dimitrova (Skopje), Art and ritual in the sacred images of Macedonia paleocristiana: mosaics, frescoes, relief decoration
12 June Prof. Cyril Mango (Exeter), Equestrian sports in and near the Great Palace at Constantinople:  Part 2
19 June Dr. Jeffrey Featherstone (Corpus) and Dr. Philipp Niewöhner (Brasenose), The topography of  the Great Palace and the iconography of the Walker Trust Mosaics at Constantinople

Conveners:  Dr. Marlia Mango (St John’s) and Philipp Niewöhner (Brasenose)