Tag Archives: oxford

CFP: Pilgrimage and the Senses, University of Oxford, 7 June 2019

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Deadline for submissions: 20 January 2019 

Keynote Speaker: Professor Kathryn Rudy (University of St. Andrews)

With the release of its inaugural issue in 2006, The Senses and Society journal proclaimed a “sensual revolution” in the humanities and social sciences. The ensuing decade has seen a boom in sensory studies, resulting in research networks, museum exhibitions, and a wealth of publications. This interdisciplinary conference hosted at the University of Oxford aims to shed light on how sensory perception shapes and is shaped by the experience of pilgrimage across cultures, faith traditions, and throughout history.

Pilgrimages present an intriguing paradox. Grounded in physical experiences—a journey (real or imagined), encounters with sites and/or relics, and commemorative tokens—they also simultaneously demand a devotional focus on the metaphysical. A ubiquitous and long-lasting devotional practice, pilgrimage is a useful lens through which to examine how humans encounter the sacred through the tools of perception available to us. Focusing on the ways in which pilgrimage engages the senses will contribute to our knowledge of how people have historically understood both religious experience and their bodies as vehicles of devotional participation. We call on speakers to grapple with the challenges of understanding the sensory experience of spiritual phenomena, while bearing in mind that understandings of the senses can vary according to specific cultural contexts. While the five senses are a natural starting point, we are open to including papers that deal with “sense” in a more general way, such as senses of time and place.

Sample topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • the role of beholding (places, relics, miracles, mementos) in the pilgrimage experience
  • haptic encounters with relics
  • ways in which pilgrims are seen: wearing specific clothing and/or badges, public acts (or affects) of devotion, how pilgrims are depicted or described
  • pilgrims’ auditory expressions: wailing/crying, chanting, singing, reciting prayers
  • bathing and purification in preparation for devotions
  • food as a ritual element or means of experiencing cultures along a pilgrimage route
  • the place of music on the pilgrimage route and/or at pilgrimage destinations
  • pain as a facet of the pilgrimage journey
  • the sensory spectacle—visual, auditory, olfactory—of pilgrimage processions
  • devotional objects that require handling, such as prayer beads and prayer wheels
  • psychosomatic sensory experiences as a means of engaging with the divine
  • the evocation of sensory participation through works of art and/or written accounts

The organisers invite 20-minute papers from any discipline on topics related to the themes outlined above, especially in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, literature, musicology, religious studies, sociology, and theology. We welcome submissions relating to aspects of pilgrimage of any faith or historical period. Doctoral students and early career researchers are particularly encouraged to apply.

Please submit a title, abstract (max. 250 words), and brief bio to pilgrimagesenses2019@gmail.com by January 20th. Successful applicants will be notified by February 5th. All submissions and papers must be in English.

Click here for more information

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Oxford Art Journal’s Essay Prize for Early Career Researchers

Essay Prize

Oxford Art Journal is inviting entries for its new Essay Prize for Early Career Researchers. The Essay Prize for Early Career Researchers aims to encourage submissions from British and international doctoral students, as well as early career researchers who are within five years of gaining their PhD. The essay will be on any topic relevant to art history and should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words (normally including footnotes) in length.

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Conference: Manuscripts from Ethiopia and Eritrea (Oxford, 1 Sept 2018)

This free study day will act as an introduction to Ethiopian and Eritrean manuscripts  dating from the 4th to 18th centuries. Context, production, and patronage will be discussed by leading experts from institutions such as The British Library and SOAS. See the detailed schedule and link to register below.

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CFP: Early Career Workshop in Medieval Intellectual History, All Soul’s College, Oxford, 22 March 2018

38df198add37e18fb750927fc44ef630CfP: Early Career Workshop in Medieval Intellectual History, All Soul’s College, Oxford, 22 March 2018
Deadline: 30 November 2017

Early career scholars, including current and recent PhD students, are warmly invited to submit a proposal for a brief presentation on their research of 10-15 minutes. The workshop will be held in the Old Library at All Soul’s College, Oxford and is organized by Dr Lydia Schumacher, Visiting Fellow at the College, Senior Lecturer in Medieval Philosophy and Theology at King’s College London, and Principal Investigator of a European Research Council project titled, ‘Authority and Innovation in Early Franciscan Thought.’ A certain number of spaces will be reserved for participants from Oxford University and King’s College London, but submissions are welcome from members of any other university. To propose a paper, please submit an abstract of up to 200 words by 30 November 2017 to Tom J. Savage (thomas.savage@kcl.ac.uk)

 

Conference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford, Saturday 18th November 2017

astonomytodeleteConference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford – Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, Saturday 18th November 2017

10.30 am – 5.00 pm

The celestial sky has been a source of fascination since ancient times with astronomy being the oldest of the natural sciences. During the medieval period, astronomy flourished in many cultures across the world, some of which followed on from earlier models created by Ptolemy. The motions of the celestial bodies were investigated, early astronomical observatories were built and some cultures constructed remarkable monuments inspired by astronomical insights. This conference will draw together the different strands of medieval astronomy from across the world and will examine how they interfaced and paved the way for the scientific developments later in the Renaissance.

Registration to attend this conference is free, but must be confirmed using the Conference booking form by midday on Friday 10th November 2017.

Confirmed speakers include:

Dr Giles Gasper (Durham University) – `The Service of Astronomy’ – European Star-Gazing and Its Implications in the Middle Ages

Professor Christopher Cullen (University of Cambridge) – Chinese Astronomy in a World Context

Dr Josep Casulleras (University of Barcelona) – From Ancient to Modern: Astronomy in Medieval Islam

Professor Ivan Šprajc (Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts) – Mayan and Aztec Astronomy: Skywatching in Prehispanic Mesoamerica

Dr Benno van Dalen (Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities) – Ptolemaic Astronomy and Its Dissemination in the Islamic World, Europe and Asia

There will be a conference dinner at St Cross in the evening following the end of the conference with an after-dinner talk by Dr Valerie Shrimplin (Gresham College) on the influence of astronomy and the cosmos on medieval art. Although the conference itself is free of charge, the dinner carries a cost of £35 to attend – booking a place for dinner can be done here.

For more information see the website: https://www.stx.ox.ac.uk/happ/events/astronomy-across-medieval-world-one-day-conference

 

Last conference places: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650

quadfromgateConference: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650, residential conference at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 6-9 September 2017
Register by 3 September

Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded on humanistic principles in 1517.  Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the long sixteenth century, Corpus was a major centre of learning and religion: it played host to the Spanish humanist, Juan Luis Vives and the German astronomer and mathematician, Nicholas Kratzer; its fellows included the Catholic reformer Reginald Pole and the Protestant thinkers John Jewel and Richard Hooker; it played a prominent part in the production of the King James Bible.  In the College’s 500th anniversary year, we are holding a conference to discuss the wider context and implications of this remarkable foundation, exploring the inter-connected worlds of learning and education, prelacy and public service, charity and communal life, religion, literature and the arts, in Oxford and beyond, during a two hundred-year period of Renaissance and Reformation.

The programme includes papers from Susan Brigden, Clive Burgess, Jeremy Catto, Paul Cavill, Alexandra Gajda, Anthony Grafton, Lucy Kaufman, Nicholas Hardy, Pamela King, Julian Reid, Richard Rex, Miri Rubin, David Rundle, Christopher Stray, Joanna Weinberg, Magnus Williamson, and William Whyte.  A round table of Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Heal and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by Keith Thomas, will bring proceedings to a close.

Details are available here: Conference Programme.

Booking is now open: please click here Renaissance College Conference.

If you have any questions about your booking, please feel free to contact kerry.atkinson@ccc.ox.ac.uk.  For any queries about the content of the conference, please contact john.watts@ccc.ox.ac.uk.

 

CfP: Gender & Medieval Studies Conference 2018, University of Oxford

GENDER AND MEDIEVAL STUDIES CONFERENCE 2018GENDER, IDENTITY, ICONOGRAPHY:

CALL FOR PAPERS

Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford

8th-10th January 2018

The glittering beauty of the Alfred Jewel, the rich illustration of the Lindisfarne Gospels, the dominating Great West Window of York Minster, the intricate embroidery of the Bayeux Tapestry, the luminous Maestà of Duccio, the opulent Oseberg ship burial, and the sophisticated imagery of the Ruthwell cross are all testament to the centrality of the visual to our understanding of a range of medieval cultures.

Constructed at and across the intersections of race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, national identity, age, social class, and economic status, gendered medieval identities are multiple, mobile, and multivalent. Iconography – both religious and secular – plays a key role in the representation of such multifaceted identities. But visual symbols do not merely represent personhood. Across the range of medieval media, visual symbolism is used actively to produce, inscribe, and express the gendered identities of both individuals and groups.

The 2018 Gender and Medieval Studies Conference welcomes papers on all aspects of gender, identity and iconography from those working on medieval subjects in any discipline.

Papers may address, but are not limited to:

· Sight and Blindness

· Visible and Invisible Identities

· Visual Languages

· Colour and Shade

· Icons and Iconoclasm

· Light and Darkness

· Collective and Individual Identities

· Orthodox and Heretical imagery

· Aesthetics

· Subject and Motif

· Convention and Innovation

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers. Please email proposals of approx. 200 words to gmsconference2018@gmail.com by Monday 4 September 2017. We will also consider proposals for alternative kinds of presentation, including full panel proposals, performance and art; please contact the organisers to discuss.

A conference for everyone

Corpus Christi College’s auditorium is fully wheelchair accessible, has accessible toilets, and features a hearing loop for those using hearing aids. Please contact us if you have specific accessibility needs you would like to discuss. We plan to provide a private lactation space.

It is hoped that the Kate Westoby Fund will be able to offer a modest contribution towards (but not the full costs of) as many postgraduate student travel expenses as possible. We are exploring other avenues to make the conference financially feasible for postgraduates and early career scholars to attend.