Tag Archives: mediterranean

CFP: 3 Sessions at ICMS, Kalamazoo 2019 (Deadline 15 September 2018)

The Restoration of the 14th-century Painted Ceiling of the Sala Magna in Palazzo Chiaromonte-Steri in Palermo, 3 linked sessions

Organizers: Licia Buttà (Universitat Rovira I Virgili, Tarragona) Costanza Conti (Università di Palermo) and Antonio Sorce (Università di Palermo)

Sponsored by the Italian Art Society

The restoration of the 14th-century wooden ceiling of the Sala Magna in PalazzoScreen Shot 2018-08-29 at 9.56.39 AM Chiaromonte—known as Steri—began in September 2017. The ceiling was crafted between 1377 and 1380, as attested by the inscription that runs along two sides of the ceiling between beams and lacunars, in which the name of the patron is also mentioned: the powerful and noble ruler of Palermo—Manfredi Chiaromonte (d. November 1391). The surface area of the wooden ceiling measures 23 x 8 meters. The iconography is displayed uninterrupted on the three sides of the 24 beams and on the 100 coffered lacunars. After the fall of the Chiaromonte family, the palace was first occupied by King Martin I, the Humane (29 July 1356 – 31 May 1410), then by the Viceroys of Aragon, and the House of Bourbon. Between 1601 and 1782 it became the Palace of the Inquisition and later the halls of the palace were used as the Court of Appeal. Today the building is home to the rectorate of the University of Palermo. The three linked sessions seek to be a fruitful occasion to study the ceiling of the Sala Magna in Palazzo Chiaromonte-Steri and medieval painted ceilings in the Mediterranean in general, in terms of conservation as well as visual culture through a multidisciplinary perspective.

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CFP: “A Global Trecento: Objects, Artist, and Ideas Across Europe, the Mediterranean, and Beyond,” IMC Leeds, 2019 (Deadline 15 September 2018)

Looking at the Trecento through the lens of current global paradigms and concerns inmarco polo historical and art historical studies might seem hazardous, or even paradoxical and provocative at best. Very few other labels have the power to evoke both the glories, achievements and limitations of traditional ‘Western’, and namely Eurocentric, art history. As a matter of fact, using the Italian word Trecento to mean the ‘Fourteenth Century’ in the visual arts, music and potentially any area of human endeavour adumbrates a clear hierarchy–with Italy at its top. It is meaningful, and perhaps no coincidence, that the term Trecento came into use in English in the same years that mark the tumultuous expansion of the new discipline of art history in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and its usage has grown exponentially ever since. While much has been done in recent decades to broaden our understanding of the period both geographically and philosophically, the Trecento remains primarily the century of Giotto and of the great Tuscan painters and sculptors. At this time of building national ‘walls’, it seems particularly appropriate to think that the seminal and transformative character of the Trecento owes much to artistic and cultural exchanges, movement of artists and patrons, circulation of models and ideas across Italy, Europe, the Mediterranean and beyond. Our aim is to bring into conversation recent research on these issues.

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New Resource: Studying and Teaching The Mediterranean

untitled-4The new website Studying and Teaching the Mediterranean is dedicated to things Mediterranean during the better part of the region’s history, the pre-modern period: roughly from the beginning of recorded history in Antiquity to the advent of modernity in the age of the Enlightenment.

Its goal is primarily, although not exclusively, didactic. The focus is on “studying to teach.” The website aims to be a one-stop shop for college and university teachers providing them with content, insights, and tools, ready-made or adaptable, for developing and infusing Mediterranean content in surveys or topical courses in Western or World history, geography, culture, religion, and literature, as well as in specialized surveys or advanced courses with specifically Mediterranean subject-matters. Research-heavy content is and will be represented to the extent it supports the site’s didactic orientation; the site offers a searchable field taking the visitor to online or other resources where that kind of material is better represented.

The site is intended to be in a kind of a permanent “under construction” state, that is, it does not aim to provide complete, polished, tried-and-tested teaching modules, lesson plans, literature reviews, bibliographies, or syllabi. Rather, it plans to remain an informal platform where any bits and snippets of didactic material, however small, is welcomed. The site’s visitors are encouraged to share bits and pieces of their own, contributions and criticism of any didactic experience they have, to enrich the platform’s informational and educational value.

The kernel of this site are the contributions of the participants in a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute in Mediterranean Studies. It is being hoped to grow the site, with the help of educators of all stripes, in conformity with the NEH mission of supporting the spread of humanitarian knowledge among successive generations of students and the general public.

CFP: Windows into the Medieval Mediterranean

Call for Chapters              

Windows into the Medieval Mediterranean

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Despite the excellent work done in the fields of Mediterranean history and studies, the Medieval period remains an area of less attention. Contributors are sought for an edited collection, under contract with publishers Taylor and Francis, that illuminates the many worlds of the Medieval Mediterranean, from 470 to 1350, as a space both geographically unified around a single body of water, while simultaneously one of great cultural, political, economic, religious, and linguistic diversity. The volume, resting on a foundation of scholarly essays, is intended to provide both students, undergraduate and first year graduate, and faculty with resources to consider the complexities and dynamism of the Medieval Mediterranean. Each chapter will consist of several essays as follows:

 

  1. A narrative portion between 2000 and 3000 words
  2. Accompanying primary source materials, written and/or visual, illustrative of the author’s argument and meant to engage students more deeply into the topic.

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CFP: Imago & Mirabilia (Barcelona, 18-20 Oct 2018)

Extended deadline!

The Ways of Wonder in the Medieval Mediterranean

18-20 October 2018 | Museu Nacional d’Art de Cataluyna

The ways of wonder in the middle Ages were shaped by a variety of places, stories and beliefs with ancient sources reworked by the Christian tradition. Activated by the opening of the Mediterranean, religious, commercial and military travels spread Christian worship, accounts and prized objects throughout Christianity. The real and the imaginary adventures confronted their protagonists with fabulous characters and places. The cult of Eastern saints found anchor points in the Western world where they sometimes developed as strongly or even more, proving, therefore, their polycentric nature.

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Call for papers “Arte y producción textil en el Mediterráneo Medieval”

Arte y produccion textilInternational conference “Arte y producción textil en el Mediterráneo Medieval”

Madrid, Museo del Traje. CIPE, 25-27 September 2018

Deadline: 15 March 2018

This conference aims to analyse medieval textile production from a cross-sectoral approach, focusing on the Mediterranean as an area of confluences that gave rise to varied manufactures with common links. This meeting, which will be attended by international specialists on textile research, proposes to re-examine assumptions on the production, functionality and circulation of these luxury objects. The collecting of these works, with regard to their archaeological and artistic value, as well as textile conservation, will also be under consideration.
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Call for Participation – Mediterranean Palimpsests: Connecting the Art and Architectural Histories of Medieval and Early Modern Cities

slide-image-1.jpgThe Cyprus Institute, with support through the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories initiative, is launching a new research seminar project: Mediterranean Palimpsests: Connecting the Art and Architectural Histories of Medieval and Early Modern Cities. Interested scholars at a formative stage of their careers are encouraged to apply for participation in the project’s three planned workshops in Nicosia, Cordoba/Granada and Thessaloniki/Rhodes.

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