Tag Archives: art

CFP: ‘Excess,’ 34th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art and Architecture, Boston University, Boston, MA, 2-3 March 2018

fixedw_large_4xCall for Papers: Excess, 34th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art and Architecture, Boston University, 2-3 March 2018
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Excess conjures the idea of the extractable, left over, too much, or “extra.” Looking closely at perceptions of the extraneous reveals excess to be a historically constructed category that marks shifting notions of cultural values. Deemed peripheral, abject, deviant, and tertiary due to factors such as geographic relationships or conceptions of power at a particular moment, excess is the focal point of the 34th Annual Boston University Graduate Symposium in the History of Art & Architecture.

We invite submissions that explore themes of excess. Topics may include but are not limited to the following: opulence; decoration; the grotesque; the carnivalesque; caricature; exuberance; indulgence; exaggeration; extremes of religious or social practice and ritual; extravagant lifestyle; expressions and critiques of abundance; so-called “luxury arts”; the overbuilt.

Papers must be original and previously unpublished. Please send an abstract (300 words or less), a paper title, and a CV to bugraduatesymposiumhaa@gmail.com. The deadline for submissions is December 1, 2017. Selected speakers will be notified by December 23, 2017, and are expected to accept or decline the offer within a week of notification. Papers should be 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a question and answer session.

The Symposium will be held Friday, March 2 – Saturday, March 3, 2018, with a keynote lecture (TBD) on Friday evening at the Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery and graduate presentations on Saturday at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

This event is generously sponsored by the Boston University Center for the Humanities; the Boston University Department of History of Art & Architecture; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Boston University Graduate Student History of Art & Architecture Association; and the Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery.

For additional information, please visit:
http://www.bu.edu/ah/students/graduate-student-history-of-art-architecture-association/the-symposium/

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CFP: International conference: ‘Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries,’ University of Warsaw and the National Museum in Warsaw, June 28 – 29, 2018

banderolesCall for Papers: International conference: Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries, University of Warsaw and the National Museum in Warsaw, June 28 – 29, 2018
Deadline:  15 January 2018

Keynote speakers:
Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)
Suzanne Karr Schmidt (The Newberry, Chicago)

The production of printed image consists of a multiplication of a particular design, whereas the consumption and reception of single impressions often involve various modifications. Multiple, but virtually identical woodcuts or engravings reproduce and thus disseminate the original composition, while at the same time they have lives of their own. They have been placed in various contexts, coloured, trimmed, framed, pasted into books and onto other objects. The place of prints in both visual and material culture of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries is a continuously growing field in recent scholarship. However, these studies usually focus on the most prominent centres of production situated in Italy, the Low Countries, France and the Empire. The principal aim of the conference Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries is to contribute to the research on the beginning and early development of the graphic arts from the perspective of the beholder, while broadening geographically the field of inquiry, i.e. by shifting the emphasis to the regions of Central Europe, the British Isles, the Iberian Peninsula, Dalmatia, as well as considering the reception of the European prints on other continents.
Possible topics include but are not limited to:
– Practices of consumption of printed images (owners and beholders, reasons for their interest in printed images; collecting and connoisseurship; printed images in public spaces and in households)
– Printed images in the early modern iconography and contemporary written sources
– Print market, copyright and censorship; printed images in confessional disputes
– Reproductive function of printed images and modifications, adaptations and transformations of original designs, matrices and single impressions
– Printmaking and bookmaking  (role of illustrations in printed books as compared with handwritten illuminated codices; illustrated books and broadsheets, written commentaries to woodcuts and engravings)
We invite proposals from scholars of all disciplines working on the history of print culture.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length and will be followed by a ten-minute Q&A session.
Please e-mail an abstract of no more than 300 words to Magdalena Herman (multipliedandmodified@uw.edu.pl) by January 15, 2018.

Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and a brief biography of no more than 200 words. Successful applicants will be notified by February 19, 2018. Please indicate whether you would be interested in further developing your paper for a publication.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Multiplied and Modified (Warsaw, 28-29 Jun 18). In: ArtHist.net, Oct 31, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16627>.

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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Deadline Extended: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

courtauldlogo

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

CFP: Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art, Graduate Conference, Florence, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, November 15 – 16, 2018

longform-original-10978-1418143091-9Call for Papers: Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art, Graduate Conference, Florence, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, November 15 – 16, 2018
Deadline: January 31, 2018.

Advanced students currently enrolled in a Doctoral (Ph.D.) program are invited to submit a proposal for a paper to be presented at “Bad Reception: Negative Reactions to Italian Renaissance Art;” this international workshop will be held on 15-16 November 2018 at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut. The event is organized by Diletta Gamberini (Italian Literature, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München), Jonathan Nelson (Art History, Syracuse University in Florence), and Alessandro Nova (Art History, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut).

For the first time, “Bad Reception” sets out to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplinary fields to discuss the phenomenon of the negative reception of Italian art and architecture, as expressed across a broad spectrum of responses written during the long Cinquecento (late 15th to early 17th century). Scholarly literature has generally focused on individual case studies, or else on the specific inflections of negative criticism in codified literary writings, such as vituperative poems on art. The present workshop seeks to advance the current state of scholarship by exploring the intersections of different genres of texts that were used to criticize paintings, sculptures, and architectures (e.g. artistic literature, epistolography, poetry, memorialistic, and archival documents), and by seeing the impact these discourses had on the afterlife of the art under discussion.

We ask participants to consider one or more of the following points, ideally in reference to several different examples:

– What were the conventions used for criticizing works of art? What were their literary and art-historical sources and models? And how did such conventions evolve over the period under examination?
– How did the criticism articulated by one type of textual discourse (e.g. vituperative poetry) interfere with the form, contents and scope of negative comments to artworks made in different genres?
– On what aspects of the works of art did the critic mostly focus (e.g. lack of decorum, verisimilitude, iconography, technical skill, beauty)?
– What were the consequences of the negative evaluations for the artistic product itself and/or for its author (e.g. revision, rejection, removal, or destruction of the artwork; reduced status of the artist; different forms of reply to the comments)?

The workshop will consist of a series of 25-minutes papers, either in English or Italian, given by senior and junior scholars. Publication of the contributions to the “Bad Reception” workshop will be decided after the event. The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz will provide funding toward the cost of travelling and accommodation for accepted speakers.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in a Doctoral program; dissertation topics need to have been formally accepted. Proposals, written in English or Italian, must include the following information:
1. Academic Summary (university level only): a) name and address of current institution, b) short description of PhD dissertation (200-300 words), c) expected date of completion, d) name and email address of advisor(s).
2. Professional Summary: a list of relevant work experience and/or publications.
3. Proposal: title, and short description (200-300 words).

Interested applicants should send their proposal, in a single file (PDF),
to sekr_nova@khi.fi.it by January 31, 2018.

Conference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 November 2017

san-giacomo-dall-orioConference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 Nov 2017, Ca’ Foscari University, Venice, November 9 – 10, 2017

“La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio: una trama millenaria di arte e fede” (Chiese di Venezia, Nuove prospettive di ricerca, 6), cur. by Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini and Deborah Howard

Like every Venetian parish church, the evolution of San Giacomo dall’Orio has been closely interconnected with the development of the surrounding area. Its free-standing site, however, remains unusual, shared only by the church of Santa Maria Formosa; like the latter, its facade addresses the canal while the apses project into the campo.
Over the centuries the parish became progressively marginalised: the area within the original parish boundaries is now landlocked, with access to the Grand Canal only possible by means of a network of small canals.  The availability of land and the spread of modest, functional housing blocks for artisans and workers — combined with the distance from the centre (which became dominated by the San Marco-Rialto axis) — led to the development of the area around San Giacomo dall’Orio as an industrial zone, dedicated in particular to wool manufacture.
Although the area became primarily a popular quarter, it still preserves several palaces erected by noble families, among them that of the diarist Marin Sanudo.  In addition, the city’s first anatomy theatre was located in the present Corte dell’Anatomia, while in 1671, thanks to an initiative of the Loredan family, the College of Surgeons was founded on the south side of the church.
This conference, therefore, aims to address the more general social and urban characteristics of the parish, and to contextualise the church within the varied daily life of the campo.  This space hosted a range of activities: ludic (remaining unpaved until the eighteenth century, it was used as a football field, even by players from noble families); religious (it was the scene of numerous confraternity processions); and socio-economic (including the practice of crafts).
The church of San Giacomo dall’Orio was probably founded towards the end of the tenth century, even if its documented status as a parish only dates back to 1130.  Rebuilt in 1225, the church acquired its main elements thanks to radical restorations after the earthquake of 1345: the aisled transepts and the present ship’s-keel roof probably date from this time.
Between the end of the Quattrocento and the mid Cinquecento the church was subject to various renovations in the presbytery, nave and aisles, leading to its present configuration.  In particular, following the removal of the rood screen at the entrance to the presbytery, the stalls were transferred to the apse.  The organ was relocated to a wooden organ loft over the main entrance portal — one of the oldest surviving examples of this arrangement.
After the mid Cinquecento, various alterations mainly concerned the interior, which houses works by such celebrated artists as Veronese and Palma Giovane.  Moreover, the parish became the setting for the altars and ritual activities of numerous confraternities, including the important Scuola del Sacramento, whose members came from a wide social range.
Interventions since the middle of the Settecento include the addition of partition walls in the transepts (later removed), the construction of a new sacristy during a programme of structural and decorative repairs at the start of the twentieth century, and, fifty years ago, a complete refurbishment of the presbytery.
Spoils and precious marbles – such as the flecked black marble Ionic column and the unusual polylobed holy water stoop – remained long after these had passed out of fashion.  The beautiful marble pulpit is unique in the city.  At the same time, the almost complete absence of wall-tombs and the relative lack of family chapels serve to underline that this was a popular quarter with few elite families.  One of the most important patrons was the parish priest Giovanni Maria da Ponte, who commissioned a cycle of paintings for the Old Sacristy.  The eucharistic symbol in the centre of the ceiling by Palma il Giovane, not to mention the Sacrament Chapel itself, indicate the growing devotion to the Holy Sacrament.  Even if the apostolic visitations of the late sixteenth-century mention certain deficiencies, the programme of artistic renewal during the Counter Reformation reflects the parish’s serious response to post-Tridentine reforms.
The remarkable spatial and artistic coherence that characterises the whole building is not easily explained by the usual practices of art-historical and architectural analysis.  It is now recognised, of course, that an appreciation of the ceremonial, liturgical and devotional practices, especially those connected with the life and character of the parish, constitute an essential element in the understanding of a sacred building and its many individual details.  The proposed conference therefore seeks to interpret this historic church within its broader historical and geographical context.
The dissemination of knowledge of Venetian churches, to audiences of experts and non-specialists alike, is a characteristic of the conferences organized by the project “Chiese di Venezia. Nuove prospettive di ricerca”. The wide participation of the public (at the sessions and guided tours) in the five conferences organized annually since 2011 has demonstrated the effectiveness of this type of gathering.
Visits to the church will be organised as part of the programme.

Program
9, November
– Ca’ Dolfin, 10.00-13.00
10.00-10.15 Registration
10.15-10.30 Welcome. Martina Frank (Università Ca’ Foscari), Gianmario Guidarelli (Università degli Studi di Padova)
10.30-10.45 Introduction. Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Deborah Howard
Session “Il contesto urbano”, chair: Deborah Howard (University of Cambridge)
10.45-11.15, Michela Agazzi (Università Ca’ Foscari), “San Giacomo dall’Orio, il contesto”

11.15-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.00 Edoardo Demo (Università degli Studi di Verona), “Società e vita industriale”
12.00 -12.30 Jane Stevens Crawshaw (Oxford Brookes University), “Life, death and the Anatomy Theatre in early modern Venice”
12.30-13.00 Discussion
13.00-14.30 Lunch

-Ca’ Dolfin, 14.30-18.15
Session “La vita della parrocchia”, chair Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova)
14.30-15.00 Pascal Vuillemin (Université Savoie Mont Blanc, “Una parrocchia tra due sedi: San Giacomo dall’Orio nel Medioevo (XII-XV secc.)”
15.00-15.45 Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari) and Jean-François Chauvard (Université de Lyon 2), “Appunti sugli stati delle anime a San Giacomo a fine Cinquecento”
15.45-16.15 Discussion
16.15-16.45 Coffee break

16.45-17.15 Francesco Trentini (Università Ca’ Foscari), “L’apostolo, il matamoros, il pellegrino. Le molteplici connotazioni del titolo di San Giacomo dall’Orio (secoli X-XVI)”
17.15-1745 Elena Quaranta(Università Ca’ Foscari), “Musica e musicisti a San Giacomo dall’Orio: un’indagine archivistica”
17.45-18.15 Discussion

novembre, 10th
Ca’ Dolfin, 9.30-12.45
-Session “Conservazione e trasformazione”, chair Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari)
9.30-10.00 Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova), “Il complesso dell’organo: trasformazioni architettoniche e funzionalità liturgica”
10.00-10.30 Adriano Amendola (Università degli Studi di Salerno), “Tra Oriente e Occidente: i marmi policromi della chiesa di San Giacomo dall’Orio”
10.30-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.15 Coffee break

11.15-11.45 Marie-Louise Lillywhite (University of Warwick), “The Decorative Programme after the Council of Trent”
11.45-12.15 Thomas Worthen (Drake University), Altars and other furnishings for the Scuola del SS. Sacramento in San Giacomo dall’Orio
12.15-12.45 Discussion
12.45-15.00 lunch

15.00-17.00 Church of di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Session “in situ”, Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Gianmario Guidarelli, Deborah Howard.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CONF: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio (Venice, 9-10 Nov 17). In: ArtHist.net, Oct 19, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16534>.