Tag Archives: art

CFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent, 24 – 26 May 18)

N-0186-00-000118-wpuCFP: Early Netherlandish Art in the Long 19th Century (Ghent,
24 – 26 May 18), Ghent, May 24 – 26, 2018
Deadline: Jun 1, 2017
To submit a proposal for consideration, please send a 250 word
abstract, a 100 word bio, and a 1-2 page CV to rediscoveryhna@gmail.com
by June 1, 2017.

Francis Haskell famously argued that the “rediscovery” of early
Netherlandish painting in the nineteenth century was central to the
notions of history and culture that undergirded the rise of the modern
nation-states of Belgium and the Netherlands. This view has been
enriched by recent scholarship on the medieval and Renaissance
revivalist movements that took hold in both countries from about 1840
through the early years of the twentieth century. Yet the complex
relationship between artistic and literary practices of the period and
the emergence of a distinctly northern European history of art remains
largely unexamined, and its implications unacknowledged.

As Léon de Laborde, Camille Lemonnier, Émile Verhaeren, Hippolyte
Fierens-Gevaert, and, slightly later, Johan Huizinga published
pioneering investigations into the world of Van Eyck, Memling, and
Rubens, a similar retrospective spirit animated the artistic
imagination. Painters from Henri Leys to Fernand Khnopff and writers
from Charles De Coster to Maurice Maeterlinck embraced northern
precedents as a key source of inspiration for works that were at once
contemporary and rooted in a rich regional heritage.

This panel aims to explore the interplay between the visual arts and
the nascent field of art history in Belgium and the Netherlands. It
seeks twenty-minute papers which address how artists, critics,
historians, and others working in the Low Countries and abroad
developed diverse perspectives on their past that continue to shape our
understanding of the subject. Papers addressing specific instances of
revivalism and historicism are welcome, as are broader studies of
historiographical and literary trends, which offer insight into how one
era may mediate and even define our vision of another.

Papers must be based on ongoing research and
unpublished. Participants must be HNA members at the time of the
conference.

Panel Chairs: Edward Wouk, Assistant Professor, The University of
Manchester; Alison Hokanson, Assistant Curator, The Metropolitan Museum
of Art

Workshop: Arts and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650)

horizontalWorkshop: Arts and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650), Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University (RCC Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St., Cambridge MA), April 28, 2017

Visual strategies of legitimization became increasingly important for
Iberian monarchies during the late medieval and early modern periods.
Mediterranean dynastic, diplomatic, and military endeavors called for
effective propaganda, both in the metropolis and in viceregal
territories, such as southern Italy. Such efforts include architecture,
both ephemeral and permanent, the decoration of palaces, court
portraiture, and historiography. The advent of a Monarchia Hispanica
under Habsburg rule required careful elaborations of national,
religious, racial, and gender identities, across a mosaic of
multilingual and multiethnic populations. This workshop aims to
highlight some of these strategies, and to create a forum for
discussion of further research avenues, under the guidance of scholars
from Spanish and American universities. It is made possible thanks to
the collaboration of the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard
University, and the University of Valencia, with additional support
from the Fulbright Commission and the BBVA Foundation.

09.00
Registration

09.15
Welcome & opening remarks

09.30
Viceregal Palaces in the Dominions of the Crown of Aragon: Charting a
Mediterranean Architecture
Prof. Mercedes Gómez-Ferrer (Universitat de València)

10.45
Icons of Dynastic Authority. Sofonisba Anguissola at Her Majesty’s
Service
Prof. Jorge Sebastián (Universitat de València)

12.00
Lunch

13.30
Facing the Infidel Other: Visual Battle Narratives and Royal Entries by
Spanish Habsburg Monarchs
Dr. Borja Franco (UNED, Madrid)

14.45
The Triumph of Tunis in Viceregal Palermo, Messina, and Naples
Prof. Cristelle Baskins (Tufts University)

16.00
Final remarks and roundtable discussion
with Prof. Felipe Pereda (Harvard University).

17.00
End of workshop

Each lecture to be followed by Q & A

Conference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting400crop.jpegConference: Collections and Collecting Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval Art Conference, Christie’s Education London, 23 March 2017

Collecting Ancient and Medieval art attracts both academic and public curiosity because the objects (and structures) in question are not only often extremely rare, but also have fascinating histories. The ability to possess a piece of our past has allowed collectors throughout the centuries to create a continuity between that past and their present. This conference will explore the history of Ancient, Byzantine and Medieval collections, how they were originally formed, how objects survive and in what contexts, and how certain collections themselves live on. It will also address how the collections of the past may be reflected in the way that we approach collecting today, the theoretical and the historical framework of collections, how they are currently presented, as well as some of the controversies in the field. Equally, the problems and issues underlying the collecting of Ancient and Medieval art, and the knowledge required to authenticate them will be discussed.

PROGRAMME

9:30 – 10:00 Registration & Coffee
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome
SECTION I: Ancient and Medieval Collections

(Chair: Cecily Hennessy, Christie’s Education)

10:15 – 10:40 Collecting liturgical objects in thirteenth and fourteenth-century Castile

Maeve O’Donnell-Morales (Courtauld Institute of Art)

10:40 – 11:05 The saint-king’s collection: The treasure of grande châsse in the Sainte-Chapelle

Emily Guerry (University of Kent)

11:05 – 11:30 ‘Through me rulers rule’: A Curious History of Imperial Coronation Regalia

Zoë Opačić (Birkbeck, University of London)

11:30 – 11:55 E.P. Warren, Greek art and the Pan Painter

Amy Smith (University of Reading)

11:55 – 12:10 Discussion
12:10 – 13:40 LUNCH
SECTION II: New Approaches to Collections

(Chair: Sadie Pickup, Christie’s Education) 

13:45 – 14:10 The Digital Pilgrim Project: approaching large collections of miniature art

Amy Jeffs (University of Cambridge)

14:10 – 14:35 From Monastic Libraries to Computer Screens: Collecting Late Antique Illumination through the Centuries

Peter Toth (British Library)

14:35 – 15:00 Collections, Controversies and the Copts: Deciphering the Late Antique Textiles of Egypt

Anna Kelley (University of Birmingham)

15:00 – 15:15 Discussion
15:15 – 15:45 COFFEE & TEA
SECTION III: Private and Public Collections

(Chair: Jana Gajdošová, Christie’s Education)

15:50 – 16:15 The intersection between collecting and scholarship: some personal experience

Michael Carter (English Heritage)

16:15 – 16:40 Exploring the Collection of George R Harding

Naomi Speakman (British Museum)

16:40 – 17:05 Title to be Confirmed

Claudio Corsi (Christie’s, London)

17:05 – 17:15 Discussion
17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks
18:00 Drinks Reception

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Aguilar de Campoo, Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017 (VII Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis)

fsmlrph_capitelmonasterio_rom_cvalle

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art, Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de Campo (SPAIN), Sept 29th – Oct 1st 2017.

CFP for 20-minute ‘free papers’ open until 30 June 2017
How to apply:
send an email with name, Academic institution, 1 page abstract and main bibliography to plhuerta@santamarialareal.org

How to enrol in the conference: email: plhuerta@santamarialareal.org
Price:
Regular 125 € Reduced 90 € Special (students) 60 €

In his The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, the sociologist Émile Durkheim formulated the idea that the division of the world into two domains is the distinctive feature of religious thought, one containing the sacred and the other all that is profane. Durkheim’s distinction cannot be applied to medieval art, however, in which the mixing of secular motifs in religious objects, images, and architecture was characteristic –at least not without complicating the theoretical notion. The senmurf on the eleventh-century reliquary of St. Matthew in SS. Cosma e Damiano in Rome, the figure copied from Orestes on the ancient Husillos sarcophagus above the altar at Fromista, a fragment of victory killing a barbarian from a consular diptych re-used on a 11th/12th century book cover, and the incorporation of diagrams and motifs from natural science in the “aula gotica” in SS. Quattro Coronati in Rome are among myriad examples that document why this is the case.

In one of the best-known texts related to medieval art, Bernard of Clairvaux railed against the imaginative variety of profane art displayed in twelfth-century Cluniac monasteries, which he considered to be a subversion of the moral order of monastic life. Bernard’s diatribe not only confirms the fact that linking the two realms was common but also raises the question of audience and hence also spatiality. As the anthropologist E. E. Evans-Pritchard postulated, sacredness (and therefore the profane) might be considered as situational, in a chronological as well as in a spatial sense. An object considered sacred in a given period may be considered profane or magical in a different time and/or space; decontextualization and reuse are thus also important issues related to the topic. Profane does not always imply anti-sacred. Indeed, given the fact that profanus means “in front of the consecrated enclosure,” the inclusion of secular elements within sacred domains suggests a dynamic interweaving that extends beyond the mere incorporation of motifs and objects. Sometimes the contacts between the two domains was regulated by rites that provided the conditions within which the relationship was made possible (i.e. consecration); other times, as when natural science was assimilated into the choice and manufacture of materials, the overlapping of sacred and profane underlies the processes of art.

In recent decades, historians have explored the uses of subversive elements in sacred art –from marginalia in illuminated manuscripts to coin-imagery and stamping incorporated in Eucharistic hosts. The conference Ars Mediaevalis 2017 sets out to assess the results of the advances made by the new art historiography and, more important, to open up still-unmapped paths for future study of the profane within the sacred during the Middle Ages.

Programme:

Friday, 29th September
Aguilar de Campoo

09.45h : Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis Opening
Chair: Francesca Español UB

10.00h Michele Bacci, Université de Fribourg – Intrusos en los iconos: perspectivas comparativas sobre los retratos individuales en la iconografia sagrada
10.45h Discussion

11.45h Philippe Cordez, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München – Le repentir d’un magicien ? Les camées de la statuette de David à la cathédrale de Bâle (vers 1320)
12.30h Free paper
12.50h Discussion

16.00h Fernado Villansenor, Universidad de Cantabria – Lo profano y sus espacios: discursos marginales en la Castilla tardogótica
16.45h Javier Docampo, Biblioteca Nacional de España – Las representaciones de los trabajos de los meses en libros de horas: la construcción de un imaginario social
17.15 Discussion

17.45 Round table. “Profano: perímetros espaciales, iconicos y semanticos en el arte medieval / Profane: spatial, iconic, and semantic edges in medieval art” Gerardo Boto.

18.45 Public presentation of the new editorial series “Ars Mediaevalis. Estudios de arte medieval”

Saturday, 30th September
Palencia

(Chair: Fernando Gutiérrez Baños UVA)

10.00h Kathrin Müller, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main Subversive – Devices: Cosmological Diagrams and the Problem of the Sacred
10.45h Free paper
11.05h Discussion

12.00h Beate Fricke, Universität Bern – Representing the Cosmos’ Origins, illuminating cosmological thoughts
12.45h Free paper
13.05h Discussion
16.00h Academic visit: Burgos: Santa María de las Huelgas Reales; Cartuja de Miraflores

Sunday, October 1st
Agilar de Campoo

(Chair: Javier Martínez Aguirre UCM)

09.15h Milagros Guardia, Universitat de Barcelona – Las pinturas murales de Sant Joan de Boi: de como contextualizar la iconografia profana
10.00h Free paper
10.20h Discussion
11.20h Free paper

11.40h Herbert L. Kessler, Johns Hopkins University / Masaryk University – From Vanitas to Veritas: the Profane as a Fifth Mode of Seeing
12.20h Discussion

13.00h Conclusions and perspectives
13.15h Closing ceremony

 

Call for Submissions: ‘Art(ifice),’ North Street Review, Spring 2017

ingolstadt_liebfrauenmc3bcnster_weinschenkenkapelle_astwerkCall for Submissions: ‘Art(ifice),’ North Street Review, University of St. Andrews
Deadline: December 1, 2016

Artifice, n. (Oxford English Dictionary ):

1. Human skill or workmanship as opposed to nature or a natural phenomenon.

2. Skill in devising and using expedients; artfulness, cunning, trickery.

These definitions of artifice contrasts human workmanship with the natural, leaving us with the dichotomy of nature versus humanity. But is art really the opposite of nature, or is there a way to bridge these two disparate domains? How do artists, curators, or collectors navigate the divide? How did viewers and creators of art approach this issue in the past, and is it even relevant question today?

How to submit: The editors of the North Street Review welcome submissions on this topic from postgraduates in Art History courses. Works between 3,000-5,000 words must be submitted to northstreetreview@gmail.com by 1 December, 2016 to be considered for publication in Spring 2017. Please format the document as a docx., adhere to Chicago style citations, and include a brief biography, with your name and affiliated institute. The North Street Review is a peer-reviewed post-graduate journal published by the School of Art History and Museum and Galleries Studies at the University of St. Andrews. Now in its twenty-first year, it has gone through many incarnations and is now a fully digital publication. For more information, please see our website.

Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions, MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts, LMU Munich

cover170x170Funding Opportunity: 5-8 doctoral positions (E13 TV-L, 66%), MIMESIS, Munich Doctoral Program for Literature and the Arts at LMU Munich funded by the Elite Network of Bavaria, starting 1 April 2017
 Deadline for application: 1 November 2016.
The International Doctoral Program (IDP) MIMESIS is dedicated to innovative doctoral research in the fields of literature and the arts, with special emphasis on historical, theoretical and transdisciplinary perspectives. It will enable cooperation between research projects in literature, theatre, performance, music, film studies, architecture and the visual arts, offering both a forum and a framework in which interests drawn from any one of these areas enter into a dialogue with other areas in the wider spectrum of creative engagements. Its research program is framed by the term mimesis, a key concept throughout the history of the arts, right up to the most recent developments in critical and cultural theory. MIMESIS offers a structured program of doctoral study combining seminars, workshops, lecture series and master classes. In addition internships with leading cultural institutions and at partner universities will be integrated into the study program.
How to Apply: The applicants should hold an excellent/above average master’s degree or equivalent in literature, art history, theatre or film studies or related subjects. The outline of the research project should show an explicit connection to the research profile of the program (i.e. mimesis).
Please use the application tool on this website:
http://portal.graduatecenter-lmu.de/gc-application/
For further information please contact:
mimesis-doc@lmu.de

Conference: 17th congress on the Dance of Death and macabre art

danse_macabre_-_guyot_marchand9_28abbot_and_bailiff29Conference: 17e congrès sur l’étude des danses macabres et sur l’art macabre en
général, Troyes (Aube/ France), médiathèque du Grand Troyes, boulevard Gambetta,
May 25 – 28, 2016

Programme :

Mercredi 25 mai 2016

Accueil de 10h à 14h

14h-14h30
Véronique Saublet, Vice –Présidente du Grand Troyes
Accueil des participants

14h30-15h
Novella Lapini (Firenze)
La processione dei vivi e dei morti nella Roma antica : il funerale
della nobilitas

15h-15h30
Gérard Gros (Université de Picardie)
Misère humaine et dubitacio mortis : l’Épître de Gautier

15h30-16h
Marie-Dominique Leclerc (D.M.E. – Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne)
Trois p’tits tours et puis s’en vont, La mort chez les marionnettes :
la Mort, sujet central de la pièce

16h-16h30
Pause

16h30-17h
Antonia Víñez Sánchez (Universidad de Cádiz)
Lo macabro en el Cancionero de Santa María de El Puerto de Alfonso X

17h-17h30
Danielle Quéruel (D.M.E. – Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne)
Le “Mors de la pomme” : entre danse macabre et théâtre médiéval

17h30-18h
Michela Margani (Università di Macerata)
I dadi della Morte : metafore del gioco nella letteratura francese
medievale

18h
Visite de l’exposition d’ouvrages à thématique macabre des fonds de la
Médiathèque

Jeudi 26 mai 2016

9h-9h30
Laura Ramello, Alex Borio, Elisabetta Nicola (Università di Torino)
“Puet nul ocire la mort?” Croyances, mythes, symboles de la mort dans
les traités pseudo-scientifiques médiévaux

9h30-10h
Alina Zvonareva (Università di Padova)
Il Ballo della Morte : un remaniement toscan du XVe-XVIe siècle de la
Danse macabre de Paris

10h-10h30
Ilona Hans-Collas (D.M.E. – GRPM)
IUDICIUM TIME. Justice et avertissement à travers la Mort et son
miroir. À propos du Jugement dernier de Malines (1526)

10h30-11h
Pause

11h-11h30
Cécile Coutin (D.M.E. – BnF)
Un Memento Mori musical de Luigi Rossi (vers 1641-1645)

11h30-12h
Marie-Suzon Druais (Université de Rennes 2)
Les représentations de la personnification de la mort, l’Ankou, en
Basse-Bretagne, aux XVIe et XVIIe siècles

12h-12h30
Raffaele Cioffi (Università di Torino)
Il supplizio dell’impiccagione nell’omiletica anglosassone, fra radici
apocrife e reminiscenze poetiche

14h30-15h
Barbara Foresti (Bologna)
Il Giudizio Universale, l’Inferno e gli Evangelisti di Pietro Pancotto:
dall’ombra di un portico, alla luce di un’interpretazione

15h-15h30
Karin Ueltschi (Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne)
Danses macabres, cortèges de morts et chasses sauvage : variations
mythiques et littéraires

15h30-16h
Omar Khalaf (Università Ca’ Foscari Venezia, Université Paris 4)
“Memorare novissima” : Caxton’s editions of Earl Rivers’s Cordyal and
the meditation on death in late medieval England

16h-16h30
Pause

16h30-17h
Didier Jugan (D.M.E. – GRPM)
Joël Raskin (D.M.E.)
Le navire de l’Eglise face aux hérésies, aux péchés et à la mort
(XVIe-XVIIe siècles)

17h-17h30
Angelika Gross (Paris)
A propos d’un fragment de la fresque de la Danse macabre de 1440 à Bâle

18h
Concert à la chapelle Argence

Vendredi 27 mai 2016

9h-9h30
Monica Engel (Amsterdam)
Daniel Burckhardt-Wildt and his enigmatic drawing of the demolition of
Basel’s Dance of Death

9h30-10h
Giuliana Giai (Torino)
Chronique de l’an Mil : la bonne et la mauvaise mort dans les “exempla”
de Novalesa

10h-10h30
Cristina Bogdan (D.M.E. – Université de Bucarest)
L’Image du jugement individuel de l’âme. Le voyage par les Péages
aériens dans l’iconographie roumaine du XVIIIe siècle

10h30-11h
Pause

11h-11h30
Marco Piccat (D.M.E. – Università di Trieste)
Le Royaume de Sardaigne et la Danse macabre

11h30-12h
Elisa Martini (Università di Firenze)
Il Casentino dei morti dimenticati. Le novelle del Sire di Narbona e di
Messer Cione

12h-12h30
Caterina Angela Agus (Torino)
La “morte doppia” nella devozione popolare tra Savoia e Delfinato

14h30-15h
Silvia Marin Barutcieff (D.M.E. – Université de Bucarest)
“…Même quand je marche dans la sombre vallée de la mort, je ne redoute
aucun mal”. Les supplices et la mort du martyr dans l’iconographie
religieuse de Valachie au XIXe siècle

15h-15h30
Tony Seaton (University of Limerick)
Sophie Oosterwijk
(D.M.E. – University of St Andrews)
The British Dance of Death : A Memento Mori for Jane Austen’s era

15h30-16h
Alberto Milano (Civica Raccolta Bertarelli, Milano)
Reliures italiennes en xylographie avec motifs macabres

16h-16h30
Jean-Louis Haquette (Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne)
Conclusion et clôture du colloque

17h
Visite de la Cité du vitrail

Samedi 28 mai 2016

8h30-19h
Excursion “A la recherche du macabre en Champagne méridionale”.
(Pont-Sainte-Marie, Les-Riceys, Chaource, Ervy-le-Châtel,
Neuvy-Sautour, Lirey)

For more information, click here.