Tag Archives: art

CfP: New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture, Leeds, 16-17 Mar 2018

Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, March 16 – 17, 2018
Deadline: Sep 30, 2017

New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture

Focusing on the materiality of medieval sculpture has proven crucial to
its study and has expanded our historical understanding of sculpture
itself. Whether monumental relief sculpture in stone, wooden sculptures
in the round, sculpted altarpieces, ivory plaques or enamelled
reliquaries, the possibilities for research on medieval sculpture now
extend far beyond the established canon.

Contemporary medieval sculpture studies have opened the field to
comparative and inclusive research that embraces the social,
performative, gendered and ritual uses of medieval sculpture. These
developments have inspired the organisers of the conference New
Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture to reflect on the field
and ask how do we investigate medieval sculpture today and what might
come ‘after’ materiality?

This two-day conference seeks to assess and critique the state of the
field on medieval sculpture and to investigate new directions,
approaches and technologies for research. A consideration of the state
of the field could be approached through, but is not limited to, the
following topics:

    Processes and techniques of medieval sculpture
    The sensory experience of medieval sculpture
    The ephemeral and intangible aspects of medieval sculpture
    Medieval sculpture, photography and digital reproduction
    Archives, casts and reconstructing medieval sculpture
    Sculpture and medievalism
    Historiography of medieval sculpture studies
    Exhibition histories of medieval sculpture

This conference is hosted by the Henry Moore Institute, a centre for
the study of sculpture, and is convened by Dr Elisa Foster, 2016-18
Henry Moore Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow.

Accommodation and reasonable travel expenses within the UK will be
reimbursed.

Paper proposals should be sent via email to Dr Elisa Foster:
elisa.foster@henry-moore.org by 30 September 2017.

New Book Series: Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Series Editors:

Kathleen Perry Long, Cornell University

Luke Morgan, Monash University

Advisory Board:

Elizabeth B. Bearden, University of Wisconsin Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington University Surekha Davies, Western Connecticut State University Richard H. Godden, Louisiana State University Maria Fabricius Hansen, University of Copenhagen Virginia A. Krause, Brown University Jennifer Spinks, University of Melbourne Debra Higgs Strickland, University of Glasgow Wes Williams, University of Oxford

 Publisher: MIP, The University Press at Kalamazoo 

For more information, visit: https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/monsters-prodigies-and-demons/

CfP: Painted on the wall:  the wall as a visual panel in the Middle Ages

The 11th Complutese Congress on Medieval Art aims to think about the visual function of medieval painted walls, taking into account that they were probably the best mass media in their context.

It will pay attention to the following topics: iconography, techniques, forms and expressive resources, socio-cultural context, preservation and the museum exhibition system.

There will be six sessions:

  • Session I: A multidisciplinary approach to medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Fernando Gutiérrez Baños (Univ. Valladolid)
  • Session II: Territory and medieval wall painting: centre and periphery. Invited Conferences of Prof. Jerrilynn Dodds (Sarah Lawrence College) and Dr Carmen Rallo (General Office of Museums of the Nation in Spain)
  • Session III: Function and meaning of the wall painting. Invited Conferences of Prof. Simone Piazza (Univ. Paul Valéry, Montpelier III) and Dr José Miguel Lorenzo Arribas (Scholl of Cultural Heritage in Spain)
  • Session IV: Techniques and colors in the preparations of the wall. Invited Conference of Prof. Rafael Ruiz Alonso (Royal Academy of History and Art of Saint Quirce)
  • Session V: Wall as an occasional support of other artistic techniques. Invited Conference of Prof. Roger Rosewell (Society of Antiquaries of London)
  • Session VI: Heritage: conservation, museums and virtualization of medieval wall painting. Invited Conference of Prof. Jordi Camps (MNAC)

For more information: https://www.ucm.es/artemedieval/pintadoenlapared

Gothic Revival, Medieval Art & the Hereford Screen

Issue 5 of British Art Studies features a One Object study of the Gothic Revival Hereford Screen. The 8 tonne metalwork structure was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and manufactured by the firm of Francis Skidmore in 1862. The collection of essays fosters discussion of the screen’s medieval models as well as its Victorian genesis.

2006AR1160_hereford_screen_cathedral_photo_custom_290x332_06200711

The Hereford Screen in Hereford Cathedral, view from North Transept, 19th century. (Image from the V&A website)

As a new and exclusively digital journal, British Art Studies’ virtual platform is celebrated through abundant interplay of text, image and audio-visual material.  It brings together seven scholars who present technical and theoretical perspectives on a single object by means of ‘traditional’ essays and short films.  This brief blog-post aims to draw attention to the medieval content of the study, notwithstanding the overall interest and coherence of all the constituent articles.

The One Object discussion is introduced by Ayla Lepine, in an essay entitled Resurrection, Re-Imagination, Reconstruction:
New Viewpoints on the Hereford Screen.

 

Essays in the discussion that focus on medieval material are:

The Hereford Screen: A Prehistory, by medievalist Matthew Reeve, guides the reader through a history of the medieval predecessors of the Hereford screen and places its production in the context of the Cathedral space and the architect’s work at Lichfield and Salisbury.

Jacqueline Jung’s contribution, a video essay entitled, The Medieval Choir Screen in Sacred Space, considers the sight-lines and sculptural relationships created by the strategically designed perforations and interior figural programmes of medieval screens and their host churches, focusing on two examples from 13th-century Italy and 15th-century Germany.

The oddly fragile, contentious choir screen, in its many historical manifestations, receives a colourful and polyphonic tribute in this One Object study. As a medieval art blog, links to the most relevant essays are given above but are, for best results, to be enjoyed with their Gothic Revival companions.

New Book Series: Christianities Before Modernity

 

Challenging the perception of Christianity as a unified and European religion before the sixteenth century, this series interrogates the traditional chronological, geographical, social, and institutional boundaries of premodern Christianity. Books in this series seek to rebuild the lived experiences and religious worlds of understudied people as well as landmark disputes and iconic figures by recovering underappreciated vernacular sources, situating localized problems and mundane practices within broader social contexts, and addressing questions framed by contemporary theoretical and methodological conversations.

Christianities Before Modernity embraces an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, publishing on history, literature, music, theater, classics, folklore, art history, archaeology, religious studies, philosophy, gender studies, anthropology, sociology, and other areas.

Grounded in original sources and informed by ongoing disciplinary disputes, this series demonstrates how premodern Christians comprised diverse and conflicted communities embedded in a religiously diverse world.

Series Editors:

Rabia Gregory, University of Missouri

Kathleen E. Kennedy, Pennsylvania State Brandywine

Susanna A. Throop, Ursinus College

Charlene Villaseñor Black, UCLA

Advisory Board:

Adnan A. Husain, Queen’s University

István Perczel, Central European University

Eyal Poleg, Queen Mary University of London

Carl S. Watkins, Magdalene College, Cambridge

Publisher: MIP, The University Press at Kalamazoo

For more information, visit: https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/christianities-before-modernity/. For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact the acquisitions

editor, Erika Gaffney (Erika.Gaffney@arc‐humanities.org).

 

Offre d’emploi – Un(e) assistant(e) à temps plein en Orientation Moyen-Âge/Temps Modernes (UNamur, département d’Histoire de l’Art et d’Archéologie)

namurFaculté : Faculté de philosophie et lettres
Département : Histoire de l’Art et Archéologie
Date d’entrée en fonction : 1/9/2017
Grade : assistant 2
Contrat : durée déterminée renouvelable
Catégorie : personnel scientifique
Poste : Allocation (au cadre)
Référence : 147-01

âches

La personne engagée devra :

  • assurer l’encadrement de travaux pratiques et leur correction ;
  • collaborer à l’enseignement de la pratique de la photographie et des bases de données ;
  • collaborer aux tâches administratives du Département ;
  • entreprendre une thèse de Doctorat en histoire de l’architecture médiévale ou moderne, qui s’inscrira dans les activités du pôle de recherche AcanthuM.

Profil

La personne engagée sera titulaire d’un diplôme de Master en Histoire de l’Art et Archéologie, orientation Moyen Âge et/ou Temps modernes.

Les compétences et les qualités requises sont :

  • bonnes connaissances dans le domaine de l’histoire de l’architecture, voire dans le 99domaine de l’archéologie du bâtiment ;
  • maîtrise parfaite du français ;
  • bonnes qualités pédagogiques ;
  • disponibilité, sens du travail en équipe.

Renseignements complémentaires

Professeur Michel Lefftz, Directeur du Département d’Histoire de l’Art et Archéologie (michel.lefftz@unamur.be).

Remarques

Il s’agit d’un contrat à durée déterminée de 2 ans renouvelable.

Les formulaires de candidature (téléchargeables à l’adresse suivante : https://www.unamur.be/universite/jobs/formulaires/formulaire-de-candidature-pour-le-personnel-scientifique-francais-anglais/view) doivent être renvoyés au Rectorat (rue de Bruxelles, 61 à 5000 NAMUR) pour le 29 avril 2017 au plus tard.

Conference: Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Art, Architecture and Material Culture (13th-16th c.), Nafplion, Wednesday 19th-Sunday 23rd April 2017

751308413_origConference: Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Art, Architecture and Material Culture (13th-16th c.), Nafplion, Wednesday 19th-Sunday 23rd April 2017
Free, booking required: http://mendicants.weebly.com/registration.html
Conference website: http://mendicants.weebly.com/

Programme:
Wednesday, 19 April 2017

9:30 – 10:00      Registration

10:00 – 10:30    Welcoming Addresses

10:30 – 11:00    Ioanna Christoforaki (Academy of Athens)
Mendicant Orders in the Eastern Mediterranean: Reviewing the Evidence

11:00 – 11:30     Coffee Break

One Step Beyond: The Mendicants in Constantinople and Dalmatia

11:30 – 11:50     Şebnem Dönbekci (Koç University)
Revisiting the Vita Cycle of Saint Francis in Constantinople: Power and Ideology in the Medieval Mediterranean

11:50 – 12:10      Silvia Pedone (Sapienza Università di Roma) and Nicholas Melvani (Koç University)
Constantinople and the Dominicans: History, Topography, and Monuments on Both Shores of the Golden Horn

12:10 – 12:30     Rafał Quirini-Popławski (Jagiellonian University of Kraków)
Mendicant Art and Architecture in the Black Sea: Pera and Caffa

12:30 – 12:50    Discussion

12:50 – 15:00    Lunch

15:00 – 15:20     Josip Belamarić (Cvito Fisković Centre and University of Split)
Franciscans and Art on the Croatian Coast in the Thirteenth Century

15:20 – 15:40    Zoraida Demori Staničić (Croatian Conservation Institute)
Franciscan Convents in Hvar: Between Cult and Politics

15:40 – 16:00    Nina Kudiš (University of Rijeka)
Venetian Seicento Painters in Franciscan and Dominican Churches of Dalmatia: Some Important Examples

16:00 – 16:20    Ivana Prijatelj Pavičić (University of Split),
Anti-Ottoman Narratives on the Altarpieces of Our Lady of the Rosary and Our Lady of Carmel in the Dominican and Franciscan Churches of Dalmatia

16:20 – 16:40    Discussion

16:40 – 17:00    Coffee Break

17:00 – 17:45     Keynote Lecture
Sophia Kalopissi-Verti (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)
Byzantium ‘Challenged’  after 1204:  Reactions, Responses and their Reflections in Iconography

17:45 – 18:00    Discussion

19:30 – 21:30    Cocktail reception at Nafplia Palace Hotel (speakers only)

Thursday, 20 April 2017

Franciscans and Dominicans in Latin Romania

9:00 – 9:20      Michalis Olympios (University of Cyprus)
Eloquent Marginalia: Figural Sculpture at the Dominican Church in Negroponte (Chalkis, Euboea)

9:20 – 9:40       Demetris Athanasoulis (Ephorate of Antiquities of the Cyclades)
The Church of Saint Francis in Glarentza (Clarence)

9:40 – 10:00    Eleni Barmparitsa (Ephorate of Antiquities of Messenia)
Settlement and Activities of the Mendicant Orders in the Peloponnese during the Late Middle Ages

10:00 – 10:20   Discussion

10:20 – 10:50   Coffee Break

10:50 – 11:10      Panayota Volti (Université Paris-Nanterre)
Some Decorative Elements of the Church of the Virgin in Merbaka, Argolis: A Visual Exegesis of  Dominican History and Spirituality?

11:10 – 11:30       Guy D. R. Sanders (American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Corinth Excavations)
The Archaeology of the Poor at Corinth in the Time of William of Moerbeke OP, Translator of Aristotle, Archimedes, Hero and Galen and Dominican Bishop of Corinth (1278-85)

11:30 – 11:50      Vicky Foskolou (University of Crete)
Reflections of Mendicant Religiosity in the Monumental Painting of the Latin Southern Greek Mainland and the Islands (13th-15th c.)

11:50 – 12:10     Discussion

12:10 – 12:30     Daphne Chronaki (Ephorate of Antiquities of Lassithi)
Παρατηρήσεις στη χωροθέτηση και στις χαράξεις ναών των επαιτικών ταγμάτων στην Κρήτη
[Observations on the planning and proportions of mendicant churches on Crete]

12:30 – 12:50    Eleni Kanaki, Daphne Chronaki and Chara Bilmezi (Ephorates of Antiquities of Herakleion and Lassithi)
Ο ναός του Αγίου Πέτρου των Δομηνικανών στο Ηράκλειο
[The church of Saint Peter of the Dominicans in Herakleion]

12:50 – 13:10     Periandros Epitropakis (Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports)
Το χρονικό της ανασκαφής της μονής του Αγίου Φραγκίσκου Ηρακλείου μέσα από τον τύπο της εποχής
[The chronicle of the excavation of Saint Francis monastery in Heraklion through contemporary press]

13:10 – 13:30     Discussion

13:30 – 15:00   Lunch break

15:00 – 15:20   Olga Gratziou (University of Crete)
The Friars and their Impact on Crete: Material and Visual Evidence

15:20 – 15:40    Kostas Giapitsoglou (Ephorate of Antiquities of Rethymnon)
Tο καθολικό της μονής της Αγίας Μαρίας Μαγδαληνής των Δομηνικανών στο Ρέθυμνο
[The katholikon of the monastery of Saint Mary Madgalene of the Dominicans in Rehtymnon]

15:40 – 16:00   Maria Borboudaki (Byzantine and Christian Museum of Athens)
Evidence of Dominican Presence in the Cretan Countryside: A Fresco of Saint Peter of Verona in the Church of Saint George in the Village of Apostoloi Pediados (Herakleion)

16:00 – 16:20   Discussion

16:20 – 16:40    Coffee Break

16:40 – 17:00   Maria Constantoudaki-Kitromilides (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)
Saint Francis and Private Devotion in Venetian Crete: Visual and Archival Evidence

17:10 – 17:30      Chryssa Ranoutsaki (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)
Saint Francis and Saint Catherine: Two Eminent Model Saints of the Mendicant Orders in Medieval Crete

17:30 – 17:50    Nickiphoros Tsougarakis (Edge Hill University)
Re-examining the Franciscan Library of Candia

18:10 – 18:30     Discussion

18:30 – 19:15    Keynote Lecture
Donal Cooper (University of Cambridge)
The Mendicant Orders as Patrons of Art and Architecture in Venetian Herakleion

19:15 – 19:30   Discussion

20:00 – 22:00   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Friday, 21 April 2017

Mendicant Presence in the Crusader Levant

9:30 – 9:50     Margit Mersch (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)
The Development of Local and Trans-Regional Mendicant Architecture: A Comparative Glance on Franciscan Churches on Cyprus and Crete (13th-14th c.)

9:50 – 10:10     Thomas Kaffenberger (Université de Fribourg)
Saint Clare or Saint Dominic? New Observations on the ‘Hagia Fotou’ Ruins in Famagusta

10:10 – 10:30   Maria Paschali (Independent Scholar)
An Image with Our Lady of Carmel in Famagusta and the Interplay of Sanctity, Piety and Power

10:30 – 10:50  Discussion

10:50 – 11:10    Coffee break

11:10 – 11:30      Rehav Rubin and Milka Levy-Rubin (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
How did the Franciscans Choose to Portray Jerusalem?

11:30 – 11:50     Fanny Vitto (Israel Antiquities Authority)
The Cradle of the Carmelites in the Holy Land before Becoming a Mendicant Order

11:50 – 12:10     Barbara Drake Boehm and Melanie Holcomb (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Facing the Forbidden:  Felix Fabri in Medieval Jerusalem

12:10 – 12:30    Discussion

12:30 – 14:30   Lunch break

14:30 – 14:50   Jaroslav Folda (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Artistic Commissions related to the Mendicant Orders in the Thirteenth Century Crusader Levant

14:50 – 15:10     Lucy-Anne Hunt (Manchester Metropolitan University)
Centres and Peripheries: A Perspective on Mendicants and Christian Art in the Crusader States and Muslim Egypt

15:10 – 15:30     Prodromos Papanikolaou (King’s College London)
Artistic Traces of  Franciscan Piety in Hospitaller Rhodes: The Marble Icons of the Virgin and St. John the Evangelist

15:30 – 15:50   Discussion

15:50 – 16:10    Coffee Break

16:10 – 16:30    Amy Neff (University of Tennessee)
Sinai in the Franciscan Visual Imagination

16:30 – 16:50   Manuel Castiñeiras (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)
From Catalonia to Sinai: A Two-Way Journey. Revisiting the Legend of King Abgar in the Saint Francis Altarpiece of Santa Clara in Vic (1414-1415)

16:50 – 17:10    Discussion

17:10 – 17:30    Coffee break

17:30 – 18:15    Keynote Lecture
Michele Bacci (Université de Fribourg)
The Franciscans as Promoters of New Holy Sites

18:15 – 18:30    Discussion

19:30 – 21:30   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Saturday, 22 April 2017

Mendicant Art between East and West
9:30 – 9:50      Jean-Pierre Caillet (Université Paris-Nanterre) and Fabienne Joubert (Université Paris-Sorbonne)
Byzantine Sources of the Crucifixion in Italy: Revisiting the Role of the Mendicants

9:50 – 10:10    Emily Guerry (University of Kent)
A Path Prepared for Them by the Lord: Saint Louis, Dominican Diplomacy, and the Odyssey of Jacques and André of Longjumeau

10:10 – 10:30   Krisztina Ilko (University of Cambridge)
Augustinian Friars in the East

10:30 – 10:50  Discussion

10:50 – 11:10    Coffee Break

11:10 – 11:30      Helen Evans (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)
The Franciscans among the Armenians

11:30 – 11:50     Ioanna Rapti (École Pratique des Hautes Études)
Armenian Αrt and the Μendicant Οrders in the East: Εncounters and Ιnteractions

11:50 – 12:10     Lauren Arnold (University of San Francisco)
Armenian Carpets in Early Renaissance Paintings: The Mendicant Orders and their Role in Facilitating a Migration of Eastern Christians to Italy (1250-1500)

12:10 – 12:30    Discussion

12:30 – 14:30   Lunch break

Round Table Discussion
14:30 – 17:00
Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies
(conference speakers only)

Welcoming Address: Dr Christos Giannopoulos (Center for Hellenic Studies)

Coordinator:  Ioanna Christoforaki (Academy of Athens)

Louise Bourdua (University of Warwick)
Anne Derbes (Hood College)
Julian Gardner (University of Warwick)
Maria Georgopoulou (The Gennadeios Library, ASCSA)
Maria Vassilaki (University of Thessaly)
Gerhard Wolf (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max Planck Institut)

17:00 – 17:30   Afternoon Coffee

19:30 – 21:30   Conference Dinner (speakers only)

Sunday, 23 April 2017
(conference speakers only)

Excursion to medieval monuments in the Argolis (Agia Moni in Nafplion and Church of the Virgin in Merbaka) in the morning. Visit to the new Byzantine Museum in Argos, followed by a guided tour of the Corinth excavations by Guy Sanders in the afternoon.