Tag Archives: art

INSCRIBING COLONIALISM IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY PORTUGAL, 26 MARCH 2019, QMUL, London

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place tomorrow, 26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

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CFP: Pilgrimage and the Senses, University of Oxford, 7 June 2019

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Deadline for submissions: 20 January 2019 

Keynote Speaker: Professor Kathryn Rudy (University of St. Andrews)

With the release of its inaugural issue in 2006, The Senses and Society journal proclaimed a “sensual revolution” in the humanities and social sciences. The ensuing decade has seen a boom in sensory studies, resulting in research networks, museum exhibitions, and a wealth of publications. This interdisciplinary conference hosted at the University of Oxford aims to shed light on how sensory perception shapes and is shaped by the experience of pilgrimage across cultures, faith traditions, and throughout history.

Pilgrimages present an intriguing paradox. Grounded in physical experiences—a journey (real or imagined), encounters with sites and/or relics, and commemorative tokens—they also simultaneously demand a devotional focus on the metaphysical. A ubiquitous and long-lasting devotional practice, pilgrimage is a useful lens through which to examine how humans encounter the sacred through the tools of perception available to us. Focusing on the ways in which pilgrimage engages the senses will contribute to our knowledge of how people have historically understood both religious experience and their bodies as vehicles of devotional participation. We call on speakers to grapple with the challenges of understanding the sensory experience of spiritual phenomena, while bearing in mind that understandings of the senses can vary according to specific cultural contexts. While the five senses are a natural starting point, we are open to including papers that deal with “sense” in a more general way, such as senses of time and place.

Sample topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • the role of beholding (places, relics, miracles, mementos) in the pilgrimage experience
  • haptic encounters with relics
  • ways in which pilgrims are seen: wearing specific clothing and/or badges, public acts (or affects) of devotion, how pilgrims are depicted or described
  • pilgrims’ auditory expressions: wailing/crying, chanting, singing, reciting prayers
  • bathing and purification in preparation for devotions
  • food as a ritual element or means of experiencing cultures along a pilgrimage route
  • the place of music on the pilgrimage route and/or at pilgrimage destinations
  • pain as a facet of the pilgrimage journey
  • the sensory spectacle—visual, auditory, olfactory—of pilgrimage processions
  • devotional objects that require handling, such as prayer beads and prayer wheels
  • psychosomatic sensory experiences as a means of engaging with the divine
  • the evocation of sensory participation through works of art and/or written accounts

The organisers invite 20-minute papers from any discipline on topics related to the themes outlined above, especially in the fields of anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, literature, musicology, religious studies, sociology, and theology. We welcome submissions relating to aspects of pilgrimage of any faith or historical period. Doctoral students and early career researchers are particularly encouraged to apply.

Please submit a title, abstract (max. 250 words), and brief bio to pilgrimagesenses2019@gmail.com by January 20th. Successful applicants will be notified by February 5th. All submissions and papers must be in English.

Click here for more information

CFP: Scaling the Middle Ages: Size and Scale in Medieval Art, 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium, The Courtauld Institute of Art, February 8, 2019

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 24th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider issues and opportunities encountered by medieval artists and viewers in relation to size and scale.

Deadline: 16 November 2018

From micro-architectural reliquaries and minute boxwood prayer beads to colossal sculpture and the built spaces of grand cathedrals and civic structures, size mattered in medieval art. Examples of simple one-upmanship between the castles and palaces of lords and kings and the churches and cathedrals of abbots and bishops are numerous. How big to make it was a principal concern for both patrons and makers of medieval art. Scale could be manipulated to dramatic effect in the manufacture of manuscripts and the relative disposition of elements within their decorative programmes. Divine proportions – of the Temple of Solomon or the Church of the Holy Sepulchre – were evoked in the specific measurements and configuration of contemporary buildings and decisions were made based on concern with numbers and number sequences.

Inspired by the ‘Russian doll’ relationship between the Sainte Chapelle in Paris and its micro-architectural miniature in the form of a gilded reliquary in the Musée de Cluny, Scaling the Middle Ages seeks to explore a range of questions surrounding proportion, scale, size, and measurement in relation to medieval art and architecture. The Sainte Chapelle, built by the saint-king of France Louis IX to house the relics of Christ’s Passion, is itself often described as an over-sized reliquary turned inside-out. The Cluny reliquary – made to house relics of Saints Maxien, Lucien, and Julien held within the chapel – both complicates and compliments that comparison, at once shrinking the chapel back down to size through close architectural quotation of its form in miniature and pointing the viewer’s attention back to that same, larger space. The relationship between these two artefacts raises a host of questions, including:

Scale and making

  • How were ideas about size and scale communicated between patrons, architects, craftspeople, and artists? In an age without universal standardised units of measurement, how did craftsmen negotiate problems of scale and proportion?
  • How were the measurements of a medieval building determined? What techniques did architects, masons, and artists use to determine the scale of their work?

Scale and meaning

  • What effects were achieved and what responses evoked by the manipulation of scale, from the minute to the massive, in medieval art?
  • What was the role of proportion and scale in architectural ‘copies’ or quotations?
  • What representational problems were encountered by artists approaching out-sized subjects, such as giants?
  • How was scale manipulated in order to communicate hierarchy or relative importance in medieval art?
  • How did size and scale function in competition between patrons or communities in their artistic commissions and built environments?

Problems of scale

  • What, if anything, happened when something was the wrong size? When was something too big, or too small? And how were such problems solved by patrons and makers?
  • How does the disembodied viewing of medieval art through digital surrogates distort or assist in our perception of scale?
  • How can modern measuring techniques and digital technology enhance our understanding of medieval objects and buildings?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these and related issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing buildings and objects from across the Middle Ages (broadly understood in geographical and chronological terms). The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research.

To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20-minute paper, together with a CV, to teresa.lane@courtauld.ac.uk and oliver.mitchell@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 16 November 2018.

Organised by Oliver Mitchell and Teresa Lane (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Click here for more information:

Conference: Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean, UNED, Madrid, October 26, 2018

Image result for portolano mediterraneoINTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

Mobility and conflict in the Mediterranean: sociability networks and artistic creation in the Late Medieval and Early Modern periods
UNED, Madrid 26 de octubre de 2018.

9.30. Presentación
SESIÓN 1: Alteridades móviles: La visión del otro en la literatura y el arte
Modera: Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza (UCM)
10:00-10:20: Representando al otro: tejidos y vestidos en los espacios de sociabilidad en el siglo XV castellano. Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
10:20-10:40: The Fifth Column: rethinking the Morisco’s visual representation. Borja Franco Llopis (UNED).
10:40-11:00: La visión del cristiano como “otro”. Alteridad en el Mediterráneo Otomano. Miguel Ángel de Bunes Ibarra (CSIC).
11:00-11:30: DEBATE
11:30-12:00: PAUSA-CAFÉ

Sesión 2: Redes de saber, redes de poder: Objetos y conocimientos en circulación
Modera: Consuelo Gómez López (UNED)
12:00-12:20: Movilidad, circulación, interacción. La formación de un grupo de presión belicista en la monarquía policéntrica de los Habsburgo (Génova, Madrid, País Vasco – siglo XVI) Bastien Carpentier (Université Littoral Côte d’Opale)
12:20-12:40: No solo inventarios. Bibliotecas en movimiento en el Mediterráneo. Margarita Vázquez Manassero (UNED)
12:40-13:00: Un mar en papeles para los ojos de Felipe II: la ciencia y el dibujo del ingeniero. Alicia Cámara Muñoz (UNED)
13:00-13:30: DEBATE
13:30-15:30: COMIDA

Sesión 3: El Mediterráneo: espacio de conflicto, espacio de intercambio.
Modera: Fernando Rodríguez Mediano (CSIC-CORPI)
15.30-15:50: Los espías del rey. La inteligencia hispano-imperial contra el turco (siglo XVI) Gennaro Varriale (Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”)
15:50-16:10 Caravaggio in Malta and his connection to the Ottoman Art. Filiz Çakir Phillip (Aga Khan Museum Toronto).
16:10-16:30: Between objects and subjects: slaves and religious artifacts in the 17th Mediterranean. Daniel Hershenzon (University of Connecticut)
16:30-17:00 DEBATE
17:00-17:30: PAUSA CAFÉ

Sesión 4: Un Mediterráneo global. Dinámicas transoceánicas  del siglo XVI
Modera: Elena Paulino Montero (UNED)
17:30-17:50 Lepanto in the Americas: Global Storytelling and Mediterranean History. Stefan Hanß (University of Manchester)
17:50-18:10: American objects at the beginning of the sixteenth century Antonio Urquízar Herrera (UNED).
18:10-18:30: DEBATE

18.30 CONCLUSIONES Y CLAUSURA

Evento patrocinado por la Facultad de Geografía e Historia y el Departamento de Historia del Arte de la UNED y organizado dentro del proyecto: HAR2016-80354-P. IMPI. Antes del orientalismo: Las “imágenes” del musulmán en la Península Ibérica (siglos XV-XVII) y sus conexiones mediterráneas (Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Universidades- Fondos FEDER).
Actividad del Grupo de Investigación: Arte y Pensamiento en la Edad Moderna y Contemporánea

Dirección científica: Elena Paulino Montero
Coordinación científica: Borja Franco Llopis

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Conference: The Right Moment. A Symposium on Kairotic Energies, Brussels, 18-19 October 2018

church-of-the-holy-nativity-631The Greek term kairós expresses an idea of ‘grasping the right moment’, which travelled through art, literature, and philosophy. And even today, it is central to debates over, for example, time management. Combining perspectives from classical reception studies and iconology, this ongoing project at KU Leuven (2017-2021) is about the reception of kairós in the visual medium from antiquity to the Renaissance. How was the notion of kairós visualized in images throughout time, from antiquity to the early modern era? And more specifically, how did text and image work together to transform the notion of kairós in various contexts?

The attending speakers from Belgium, Germany, France, Israel, Croatia, The Netherlands, Romania, The United Kingdom, The United States, and Switzerland have not only been selected on the basis of their interdisciplinary skills in the field; but equally because of their distinctive contribution to the method of iconology and visual anthropology.

Many among them are key influencers on, among other things, the importance of the Humanities in terms of peace process work, ecology, and the relationship between Eastern and Western civilizations.

Barbara Baert – Kunstwetenschappen KU Leuven – www.illuminare.be

PROGRAM

Thursday, 18 October

08.30-09.00 Registration

09.00-09.15 Welcome speech by Pierre Van Moerbeke,
Executive director of Francqui Foundation

09.15-09.30 Welcome speech by Luc Sels, Rector of KU
Leuven

09.30-10.00 Introduction by Barbara Baert

10.00-10.30 Coffee break

Part I
10.30-11.30 Giotto, the Eye and the Gaze – Victor Stoichita
Respondent: Herman Parret

11.30-12.30 Time in the Context of Ecclesia/Synagoga – Miri Rubin
Respondent: Inigo Bocken

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part II
14.00-15.00 Epochal Madness: Notes on the Present Moment – W. J. T. Mitchell
Respondent: Stéphane Symons

15.00-16.00 The Manic Moment – Davide Stimilli
Respondent: Hedwig Schwall

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 The Silence of Lifta – Avinoam Shalem
Respondent: Amr Ryad

17.30-18.15 Presentation of the new series Recollection: Experimental Reflections on Texts, Images and Ideas – Veerle De Laet (Leuven University Press) & Ellen Harlizius-Klück

Friday 19 October

08.30-09.00 Welcome & coffee

Part III
09.00-10.00 The Nativity Church in Bethlehem as Kairotic
Space – Bianca Kühnel
Respondent: Marina Vicelja-Matijašic

10.00-11.00 L’occasion de la grâce dans le martyre – Pierre Antoine Fabre
Respondent: Ralph Dekoninck

11.00-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.30 A Dialogue of Early Buddhism, Hinduism and
Jainism on the Varieties of Auspicious Moments – Eugen Ciurtin
Respondent: Reimund Bieringer

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part IV
14.00-15.00 Generating Synchronicity: Bodily and Affective
Techniques – Elisabeth Hsu
Respondent: Philippe Van Cauteren

15.00-16.00 The Moment of the Dangerous Women – Catherine Harper
Respondent: Ann-Sophie Lehmann

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 Concluding remarks – Han Lamers & Bart Verschaffel

17.30-18.00 Book presentations: Paul Peeters (Peeters Publishers) & Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art

18.00-19.30 Farewell drinks

Contact and registration: stephanie.heremans@kuleuven.be
Registration deadline: 30 September 2018

Scholarship: Francis Haskell Memorial Fund/The Burlington Magazine Foundation 2018 Scholarships

HaskellScholarship: Francis Haskell Memorial Fund/The Burlington Magazine Foundation 2017 Scholarships
Deadline: 22nd October 2018

Grants of up to £2000 will be awarded from the Francis Haskell Memorial Fund this year to enable scholars to spend time in libraries or archives carrying out advanced research in the history of western art. Preference may be given to candidates in the early stages of their careers; to subjects related to the commissioning, collecting or interpretation of works of art made before 1914; and to research carried out outside the applicant’s country of residence. Scholars from any country may apply. An additional award may be made by the Trustees of The Burlington Magazine Foundation in conjunction with the Francis Haskell Trustees.

How to apply: Applications, including a two-page proposal, a C.V. and a budget, should be sent by email to caroline.m.elam@gmail.com by 22nd October 2018 – please label all attachments with surname of applicant. There is no application form. Applicants should ask two referees to write separately to the same email address by the same deadline in support of their proposals. Awards will be made by 7th December 2018.

CFP: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019: GENDER AND ALIENS, Durham University, 7th–10th January 2019

In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or ‘strangers’), and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens.

This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the medieval world. Social, political and religious attitudes to aliens and the alienated were not constant over the centuries from c. 400 to c. 1500, and nor were they uniform across the whole world. Some foreigners, as aliens, might end up integrated into the societies they entered; others might find themselves marginalised, lonely or alone; or oppressed, as outlaws, outcasts, or slaves. Gender might exacerbate or mitigate this, depending on time, place and context. Authors or artists depicting parts of the world far from and alien to their own often filled them with people or beings not like them, demonstrating the imaginative power of alterity, while the reactions of those who encountered people from distant places and observed or participated in their customs could include recognition of similarity as well as difference. Foreigners were also not the only people who might find themselves alienated from, or within, certain societies or cultures: the medieval world included many marginalised groups. The issues of aliens and alienation may be differently construed in the modern world, but they are certainly not new. The relationship of gender to these topics is complex, variable and significant.

The conference aims to enable discussion of these issues as they relate to the whole medieval world from c. 400 to c. 1500. The organisers welcome proposals for papers on any topic related to gender and aliens or alienation, broadly construed, and encourage submissions relating to the world beyond Europe. Papers might consider issues such as:

  • refugees, immigrants, emigrants
  • inclusion and exclusion
  • alterity and difference
  • outlaws, the law, legality
  • marginalised or disenfranchised groups
  • non-normative bodies, illness, disability
  • acculturation
  • imagined geographies
  • borders and frontiers
  • ethnicity and identity
  • slavery and slaves

In addition to sessions of papers, the conference will also include a poster session. Proposals for a 20-minute paper or for a poster can be submitted at https://tinyurl.com/gms2019submit by September 30th 2018. The conference organisers are also happy to consider proposals for other kinds of presentation: please contact the organisers at gmsconference2019@gmail.com to discuss these. Some travel bursaries will be available for students and unwaged delegates to attend this conference: please see http://medievalgender.co.uk/ for details.


Images: The Emperor and the Court Lady, from ‘Nüshi zhen’ (Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies), text composed by Zhang Hua (c.AD 232-300); 6th-8th century. (C) The Trustees of the British Museum

God casts out Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden, in the ‘Old English Hexateuch,’ London, British Library, Cotton Claudius B.iv, f. 6v, 11th century. (C) British Library