Tag Archives: language

CFP: Moyen Âge et séries. Numéro spécial de la revue « Médiévales : Langues, Textes, Histoire »

La revue Médiévales : Langues, Textes, Histoire envisage la publication en 2020 d’un numéro thématique provisoirement intitulé « Moyen Âge et séries ».

Les séries occupent une place croissante dans les pratiques culturelles contemporaines, et plusieurs d’entre elles ont à voir avec la période médiévale. Il peut s’agir en premier lieu de la mise en scène d’un épisode historique, d’une période donnée, de la vie d’un personnage célèbre, voire de l’adaptation d’une œuvre littéraire médiévale ou ayant pour cadre le Moyen Âge – ce qui implique un travail documentaire plus ou moins scientifique. Il existe aussi, bien entendu, un Moyen Âge de fantasy, fantastique et fantaisiste, mais que le spectateur reconnaît néanmoins comme « moyenâgeux ». Certaines séries, enfin, comportent des références plus subtiles et moins immédiatement intelligibles à des œuvres ou des événements de la période médiévale.

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CFP: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS): Truth and Fiction, 28-30 June 2018

25e58865266eadd5bdb9a530a627b0db-medieval-art-middle-agesCall for Papers: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS), Truth and Fiction
Deadline: 24 November 2017.

In the wake of the US presidential election and the Brexit referendum, the Oxford English Dictionary chose the expression “post-truth” as its word of the year. This expression underlines the growing tendency to dismiss objective facts in favor of impulsive—and often prejudicial—feelings, frequently supported by “alternative facts.” The contentious relationship between the truth and lies, or truth and fiction, which is currently playing out in the public arena has, in fact, a long-standing legacy—one which can be traced back to the Middle Ages. For this reason, this year’s IMS conference seeks to investigate the variety of different approaches to truth and fiction that existed in the Middle Ages.

One possible avenue of inquiry concerns new ideas of Truth introduced by the Gregorian reforms. On a philosophical and doctrinal level, the idea of the infallibility of the Pope, the “Doctor of Truth,” was introduced by Gregory VII who, taking up the words of Christ, contended that he was the Truth (via, veritas, et vita). From a liturgical and sacramental point of view, on the other hand, we can study contemporary tenets of Eucharistic doctrine as a challenge to common sense as a mystery of human understanding—albeit articulated in rationalist terms. Papers thus might address the manner by which the Gregorian reforms placed the question of truth at the center of the demands of society: by constructing this “ideology of truth,” but also—and above all—by implementing mechanisms like preaching, which spread Truth to Christians, and confession, which introduced the obligation to speak the truth. We are particularly interested in the place and the role of Fictions in these devices (sermons, exempla, vita, etc.).

A second approach to this theme is through language, discourse and narrative forms that aimed to produce a supposed truth. We could examine the relationships between literature and history and their ambiguity with respect to the truth. For example, fictionalized historical narratives throughout the medieval period were frequently thought to be true because they provided a means of decrypting the social order. As John of Salisbury wrote, “even the lies of poets served the Truth.” Papers might explore relationships between truth and fiction through the lens of historical and literary genres (novels, epics, etc.) and the ‘truths’ they produced, placing special emphasis on the way that it was possible to believe the facts related in these works. The importance of these historico-literary fictions—what Paul Veyne called “doctrine in the face of facts”—might also be taken into account.

Law and rhetoric also construct notions of truth. Rhetoric permits the control of the relationship between the author and the audiences of a text and the establishment of the status of a text as veridic, among other things. It can even create direct links between music and words, using metaphor as a means of approaching the truth. Papers could consider, for instance, the virtuosity of the effects of Truth produced by the dictamen or even the quaestio scholastique as a method for establishing Truth with certitude, as well as the place of fiction within these new political languages.

Images throughout the medieval period play a fundamental role in the construction or undermining of truth(s). According to Augustine, the image is not truth, but rather a means of understanding Truth. For him, the work of art renders abstractions concrete using representations hat are both specific and individualized. What is the art object’s role in dispelling truth or decrying falsehoods? Through what formal and material means does it achieve either? Papers might consider the use and forms of medieval diagrams, the role of the art object in spiritual form, etc.

Finally, the conference aims to examine the origins and development of interrogative procedures in the medieval period, in that they illustrate relationships with the truth maintained by medieval societies. We are especially interested in the uses and status of fictive facts in inquisitorial trials, the manner that fictions were revealed during trials, or even how the participation of individuals in inquisitorial trials was viewed as an instrument of legitimization of power and as a way of acknowledging those individuals’ own truths and interpretations of facts.

This great diversity of themes opens participation to researchers working in a variety of different fields and coming from a variety of backgrounds: historians, art historians, musicologists, philosophers, literary scholars, specialists in auxiliary sciences (paleographers, epigraphists, codicologists, numismatists)… While we focus on medieval France, compelling submissions focused on other geographical areas that also fit the conference theme are welcomed. In bringing together such diverse proposals, the IMS conference seeks to take a new look at the notion of Truth, its articulations, and its relationship with Fiction in the medieval world.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words (in French or English) for a 20-minute paper should be sent to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com. Each proposal should be accompanied by full contact information, a CV, and a list of the audio-visual equipment required for the presentation.

The deadline for abstracts is 24 November 2017.

Paper selections will be made by a scientific committee composed of Catherine Croizy-Naquet (Univ. Paris 3/CERAM), Marie Dejoux (Univ. Paris 1/LAMOP), Lindsey Hansen (IMS), Fanny Madeline (LAMOP/IMS), and Valerie Wilhite (Univ. of the Virgin Islands/IMS), as well as the members of the Board of Directors of the IMS.

Please be aware that the IMS-Paris submissions review process is highly competitive and is carried out on a strictly anonymous basis.

The selection committee will email applicants in mid-December to notify them of its decisions. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS-Paris website thereafter.

Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fees (35€ per person, 20€ for students, free for members of LAMOP and CERAM; 10€ membership dues for all participants).

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organization that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For more than a decade, the IMS has served as a center for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work or study. For more information about the IMS-Paris and for past symposium programs, please visit our websites: www.ims-paris.org and https://imsparis.hypotheses.org.

IMS-Paris Graduate Student Prize:

The IMS-Paris is pleased to offer one prize for the best paper proposal by a graduate student. Applications should consist of:

1) a symposium paper abstract

2) an outline of a current research project (PhD dissertation research)

3) the names and contact information of two academic referees

The prize-winner will be selected by the board and a committee of honorary members, and will be notified upon acceptance to the Symposium. An award of 350€ to support international travel/accommodation (within France, 150€) will be paid at the symposium.

Summer School: intensive introduction to Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods, Notre Dame University, June 13-July 22

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Summer School: intensive introduction to Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods, Notre Dame University, June 13-July 22, 2016
Apply now! 
This summer, the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame is offering an intensive introduction to Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods (please see the attached poster). In this course, students will
  • learn about developments in medieval Latin (morphology, syntax, vocabulary, orthography and pronunciation)
  • practice close reading and accurate translation of a broad and representative selection of medieval Latin texts, including Latin influenced by another language; administrative Latin; technical texts; scholastic Latin; Latin of various professions; narrative accounts; imitations of classical style; formal styles; rhymed prose; cursus; ornamented styles; rhymed and metric poetry
  • review and practice the principal constructions of classical Latin
  • overcome your anxiety about sight reading
  • be introduced to the history, areas, and tools of medieval Latin philology through active exercises
  • work very hard, and have lots of fun!
The course runs from June 13-July 22. Online registration is open now. Visit summersession.nd.edu for additional information and to register. Graduate students who take Medieval Latin are eligible to compete for the Medieval Academy’s CARA (Centers and Regional Associations) scholarships, which provide full tuition for either course taken for credit. Visit medievalacademy.org for application details.
Should you have additional questions about the course, please contact the instructor, Dr. Andrew Irving, at airving1@nd.edu. Inquiries about registration and summer courses at Notre Dame should be directed to the Summer Session Registrar.

Job: Postdoctoral Position at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, Project “Language(s) of Art History”

kunsthistorisches-institut-in-florenz-max-planck-institutJob: Postdoctoral Position at the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, Project “Language(s) of Art History”
Deadline for applications: 15 March 2016

The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, Department of Professor Alessandro Nova, invites qualified candidates to apply for one postdoctoral position.

Starting on 1 June 2016, the position is offered for two years. We are looking for outstanding candidates with passive German language skills, who are interested in the problem of how language shapes and limits intellectual discourse in art history (“Language(s) of Art History”).

Candidates are asked to address their application in German, English or Italian, in a single pdf (max. 2 MB), via e-mail to Prof. Dr. Alessandro Nova (dirnova@khi.fi.it), including the following documents:

  • detailed cv with photo
  • certificate of graduation / PhD
  • research proposal (max. 2 pages)
  • two reference letters

The deadline for applications is 15 March 2016.

More information: http://www.khi.fi.it/5376767/20160315_Postdoktorand

Call for Papers: Writing Britain, 500-1500

Call for Papers: Writing Britain: 500-1500
University of Cambridge, Faculty of English, 30 June – 2 July 2014
Deadline: 20 February 2014

stockphotopro_5711473WLX_medieval_writinWriting Britain is a biennial event which aims to draw on a range of approaches and perspectives to exchange ideas about manuscript studies, material culture, multilingualism in texts and books, book history, readers, audience and scribes across the medieval period. The 2014 iteration of the Writing Britain Conference will take place in the English Faculty at the University of Cambridge under the auspices of the Centre for Material Texts. Some of the topics which we are keen to explore are literary and non-literary agencies and their significance and/or relevance in the medieval period across British medieval written culture in English, French, Latin, Norse and the Celtic languages. More broadly, we are interested in other questions such as: How did local writers, compilers and readers use writing to inscribe regional identity within broader conventions or, on the other hand, impress ‘universal’ practices and constructs on local populations? What were the different markets for books? Can we characterize their developments and differences? What new or existing methodologies can be employed to localise texts and books across Britain? What is the role of the Digital Humanities in the study of medieval book culture?

Plenary speakers: Jonathan Wilcox (University of Iowa), Richard Beadle (University of Cambridge) and Simon Horobin (University of Oxford)

We welcome proposals from scholars working on any aspects of British medieval written culture up to 1500. Please visit our conference web site in order to submit an abstract (300 words or fewer) for a twenty-minute paper. Please send your abstract by 20 February 2014. Abstracts from postgraduate students are welcome and graduate rates will be provided. For further information please visit the website where contact details of the organisers will also be available.

Conference website here.