Category Archives: Publications

Publication: “The Idea of the Gothic Cathedral. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Meanings of the Medieval Edifice in the Modern Period” By Stephanie a. Glaser (ed.)

RITUS_9The essays in this book focus on various social, political, cultural, and aesthetic meanings ascribed to Gothic cathedrals in Europe in the post-medieval period.

Central to many medieval ritual traditions both sacred and secular, the Gothic cathedral holds a privileged place within the European cultural imagination and experience. Due to the burgeoning historical interest in the medieval past, in connection with the medieval revival in literature, visual arts, and architecture that began in the late seventeenth century and culminated in the nineteenth, the Gothic cathedral took centre stage in numerous ideological discourses. These discourses imposed contemporary political and aesthetic connotations upon the cathedral that were often far removed from its original meaning and ritual use.

This volume presents interdisciplinary perspectives on the resignification of the Gothic cathedral in the post-medieval period. Its contributors, literary scholars and historians of art and architecture, investigate the dynamics of national and cultural movements that turned Gothic cathedrals into symbols of the modern nation-state, highlight the political uses of the edifice in literature and the arts, and underscore the importance of subjectivity in literary and visual representations of Gothic architecture. Contributing to scholarship in historiography, cultural history, intermedial and interdisciplinary studies, as well as traditional disciplines, the volume resonates with wider perspectives, especially relating to the reuse of artefacts to serve particular ideological ends.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Medieval Edifice in the Modern Period — STEPHANIE A. GLASER

Part I — The Cathedral and the Nation

The Moorish-Gothic Cathedral: Invention, Reality, or Weapon? — MATILDE MATEO

Acting Medieval, Thinking Modern, Feeling German — MICHAEL J. LEWIS

L’Histoire d’une cathédrale: Viollet-le-Duc’s Nationalist Pedagogy — ELIZABETH EMERY

The Gothic Cathedral and Historiographies of Space — KEVIN D. MURPHY

Part II — The Cathedral between Art and Politics

The Anarchist Cathedral — MAYLIS CURIE

L’Imaginaire de la cathédrale à l’épreuve de la Grande Guerre — JOËLLE PRUNGNAUD

Church, Nation, and ‘The Stones of France’ — RONALD R. BERNIER

Part III — The Cathedral in the Arts

Patterns of Behaviour  Architectural Representation in the Romantic Period — KLAUS NIEHR

Frozen Music and Symphonies in Stone. Gothic Architecture and the Musical Analogy: Intersecting Trajectories in German and French Thought from the Eighteenth through the Nineteenth Centuries — STEPHANIE A. GLASER

Délires opiomanes et gothicomanes de Thomas De Quincey à Wilfred Sätty — JEAN-MICHEL LENIAUD

The Cathedral as Time Machine: Art, Architecture, and Religion — RICHARD UTZ

Select Bibliography

Index

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Publication: ‘San Michele in Monte Laureto a Putignano. La grotta dell’Angelo e la cultura pittorica angioina nel meridione barese’ by Marcello Mignozzi

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A new book on the theme of Angevin Art in Southern Italy has just been published.
In San Michele in Monte Laureto a Putignano. La grotta dell’Angelo e la cultura pittorica angioina nel meridione barese, Marcello Mignozzi reconstructs the history of the rupestrian church of Saint Michael in Monte Laureto in Putignano (Apulia), Italy, investigating its historiographical, historical, and artistic aspects. The cross analysis of archival and artistic data allows the author to understand the value of an almost forgotten Medieval Sanctuary. The magnificent fourteenth-century fresco with the Crucifixion, made by two artists from Apulia influenced by Neapolitan art, is finally included in the pictorial context of the Angevin region. In this regard a lot of space is dedicated not only to examine the theme of the Crucifixion in the painting of the entire region, but also to frescoes, many of them unpublished, in Polignano, Mola di Bari, Monopoli, Noci, Conversano, Rutigliano, Capurso, Triggiano. Part of the work is then dedicated to the events of the rock church in the Modern Age, to the sculptures of Stefano da Putignano, and to the Contemporary Age. Finally, the study of road networks during the Middle Ages allows the reconstruction of the complex system of pilgrimages, but also of political and artistic relations between Putignano and the Angevin Principality of Taranto.

For more information on this publication, see https://www.ibs.it/san-michele-in-monte-laureto-libro-marcello-mignozzi/e/9788899224301.

Publication: Manuscripts in the Making Art and Science, vol. 1. Edited by Stella Panayotova & Paola Ricciardi

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Manuscripts in the Making
Art and Science, vol. 1
Edited by Stella Panayotova &  Paola Ricciardi

 ISBN 978-1-909400-10-8

More Info: http://bit.ly/2ywI3Si

 This ground-breaking publication presents  the papers delivered at the international Conference held in Cambridge in December 2016 to mark the end of the Fitzwilliam Museum’s acclaimed bicentenary exhibition “Colour: The Art and Science of Illuminated Manuscripts”.  It is the first of two volumes in which medievalists and scientists share the results of their research, and combine here to elucidate both the materials and techniques  of production of illuminated  manuscripts,  as well as the artists’ collaboration and their aesthetic objectives.  Of the 34 papers given at the proceedings, 17 are included in the present volume covering scientific analyses of West European, Byzantine and Islamic manuscripts, Colour and Pigment Studies, Painting Techniques and Workshop Practices, as well as details of the latest scientific techniques and instruments employed for these non-invasive and non-destructive investigations into the delicate manuscripts. The texts are accompanied by over 200 illustrations as well as explanatory tables and diagrams. 

Table of Contents

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Table of Contents: Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art, Winter 18 issue

JHNA

Historians of Netherlandish Art announces the publication of the Winter 2018 issue (vol. 10:1) of the refereed, open-access Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art (jhna.org).

Table of Contents:

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Exclusively Medieval, Online & Open Access: 2017 special issue of British Art Studies

The latest issue of British Art Studies (an open access, online Art History journal published by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art), is entirely devoted to Medieval Britain. The content is derived from a conference held at the British Museum in 2014: Invention and Imagination in British Art & Architecture, 600-1500.

It opens with an editorial by guest editors Sandy Heslop and Jessica Berenbeim, followed by twelve articles in traditional format: 

Thanks to the digital platform, it is possible to reference the articles to the nearest paragraph using the DOI link. The platform’s scope is further tested through the Conversation Piece and Handling Digital Objects portions of this special issue: 

Another innovative feature is a virtual simulation of the object sessions held at the 2014 conference. In actuality, these took the form of guided sessions with objects in the seminar rooms at the conference venue. In the journal, they are recreated via four interactive 3D models of objects, each accompanied by a short essay: 

New Book Series: Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Series Editors:

Kathleen Perry Long, Cornell University

Luke Morgan, Monash University

Advisory Board:

Elizabeth B. Bearden, University of Wisconsin Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington University Surekha Davies, Western Connecticut State University Richard H. Godden, Louisiana State University Maria Fabricius Hansen, University of Copenhagen Virginia A. Krause, Brown University Jennifer Spinks, University of Melbourne Debra Higgs Strickland, University of Glasgow Wes Williams, University of Oxford

 Publisher: MIP, The University Press at Kalamazoo 

For more information, visit: https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/monsters-prodigies-and-demons/

Gothic Revival, Medieval Art & the Hereford Screen

Issue 5 of British Art Studies features a One Object study of the Gothic Revival Hereford Screen. The 8 tonne metalwork structure was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and manufactured by the firm of Francis Skidmore in 1862. The collection of essays fosters discussion of the screen’s medieval models as well as its Victorian genesis.

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The Hereford Screen in Hereford Cathedral, view from North Transept, 19th century. (Image from the V&A website)

As a new and exclusively digital journal, British Art Studies’ virtual platform is celebrated through abundant interplay of text, image and audio-visual material.  It brings together seven scholars who present technical and theoretical perspectives on a single object by means of ‘traditional’ essays and short films.  This brief blog-post aims to draw attention to the medieval content of the study, notwithstanding the overall interest and coherence of all the constituent articles.

The One Object discussion is introduced by Ayla Lepine, in an essay entitled Resurrection, Re-Imagination, Reconstruction:
New Viewpoints on the Hereford Screen.

 

Essays in the discussion that focus on medieval material are:

The Hereford Screen: A Prehistory, by medievalist Matthew Reeve, guides the reader through a history of the medieval predecessors of the Hereford screen and places its production in the context of the Cathedral space and the architect’s work at Lichfield and Salisbury.

Jacqueline Jung’s contribution, a video essay entitled, The Medieval Choir Screen in Sacred Space, considers the sight-lines and sculptural relationships created by the strategically designed perforations and interior figural programmes of medieval screens and their host churches, focusing on two examples from 13th-century Italy and 15th-century Germany.

The oddly fragile, contentious choir screen, in its many historical manifestations, receives a colourful and polyphonic tribute in this One Object study. As a medieval art blog, links to the most relevant essays are given above but are, for best results, to be enjoyed with their Gothic Revival companions.