Tag Archives: interdisciplinary

CfP: (Im)mobility: Dialectics of Movement, Power & Resistance, LSE (28/11/2017)

The London Arts and Humanities Partnership (LAHP) is pleased to announce the cross-disciplinary student-led conference (Im)mobility: Dialectics of Movement, Power and Resistance, which will be hosted by the PhD Academy of the London School of Economics on 28 November 2017 (10am – 5pm).

The keynote speaker will be Dr Alexander Samson, Reader in Early Modern Studies at University College London.

The Call for Papers is open until 30 July 2017. View it online or download the PDF.

Venue: PhD Academy, London School of Economics, Lionel Robbins Building (4th floor), 10 Portugal Street, London WC2A 2HD, United Kingdom.

New Book Series: Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Series Editors:

Kathleen Perry Long, Cornell University

Luke Morgan, Monash University

Advisory Board:

Elizabeth B. Bearden, University of Wisconsin Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, George Washington University Surekha Davies, Western Connecticut State University Richard H. Godden, Louisiana State University Maria Fabricius Hansen, University of Copenhagen Virginia A. Krause, Brown University Jennifer Spinks, University of Melbourne Debra Higgs Strickland, University of Glasgow Wes Williams, University of Oxford

 Publisher: MIP, The University Press at Kalamazoo 

For more information, visit: https://mip-archumanitiespress.org/series/mip/monsters-prodigies-and-demons/

CFP: “‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages,” International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 3rd-6th July 2017

death-medievalCall for Papers: “‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages,” International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 3rd-6th July 2017
Deadline: 23rd September 2016.

**Should this session attract enough interest it will become a three-part series, with each session focussing more deeply on the individual themes of death, disability and disease.

Within late-medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying), disabilities and chronic diseases?

This session will consider the feminisation of death, disability and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying, diseased or disabled). It will hope to consider the contradictory nature of female disease and disability which both engendered an elevated sense of holiness and, conversely, a sense of physical monstrosity; the female response to death, disability and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death, disease and disability dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity?

We welcome multi-disciplinary papers from all geographical locations, c.1300-c.1500, which engage with themes such as (but not limited to): Representations of death, disease and/or (dis)ability; literature either for or by women dealing with the themes of death, disease and/or disability; the tradition of Memento Mori and/or the Danse Macabre; the gendering of ‘Death’; the Black Death’s impact on traditional gender roles; obstetric death; female piety and holy anorexia; the effect of chronic disease and/or disability on late-medieval constructions of masculinity; women and disease (as the developers of cures, writers of recipes, carers or patients, etc.); female use of disability aids and/or prosthetics; and self-inflicted disfigurement.

How to submit: Please send a paper title and an abstract of 100-200 words to Rachael Gillibrand at the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds (hy11rg@leeds.ac.uk) by 23rd September 2016.

International Workshop: Relics @ the Lab, KIK-IRPA, Brussels, October 27-28 2016.

relics to deleteInternational Workshop: Relics @ the Lab, KIK-IRPA, Brussels, October 27-28 2016.
Over the past decade the scientific interest in relics and kindred artifacts has grown enormously. Without any doubt relics as well as relic shrines and associated objects have played a prominent role in European history since the introduction of Christianity. While in the past primary, secondary as well as tertiary relics were merely studied in relation to their religious and (art) historical background, recently the rise of a more scientific and archaeological approach is noticed. Nowadays researchers become more interested in the origin and nature of these sacred objects and ask different questions:
  • What information can relics give us about the people buried in the shrines? Who were these people? What do we know about the way they lived? When did they live? What about diseases and other disabilities?
  • What information can be retrieved from the objects kept with the relics and made of textile, wood, stone or metal. What was their purpose? Are they contemporaneous to the relic or are they older or younger additions? Why would they have been added? How should we preserve them?
Scientists of many different disciplines are involved in the study of relics and kindred artefacts, but till now there was no real forum for these people to exchange ideas and discuss methods. Therefore the Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage (KIK-IRPA, Brussels) is organising a two-day workshop on the scientific study of relics.
During this meeting we want to give analytical scientists, textile specialists, conservators, anthropologists, historical researchers, people involved in 3D-reconstruction as well as radiocarbon dating specialists a forum to exchange ideas about relics.

A full programme can be found here
Tickets: The registration fee is €75. This includes two lunches, coffee, tea and refreshments during the breaks and a book with the summaries of all the oral presentations and posters. Click here to register.

CFP: Mutual Imaginings of Europe and the Middle East 800-1700 (3rd December 2016)

Beyond Borders:
Mutual Imaginings of Europe and the Middle East (800-1700)
Barnard College’s 25th Biannual Medieval and Renaissance Studies Conference
Saturday, December 3, 2016
Call for Papers
Recent scholarship is challenging the stark border between Europe and the Middle East during the long period between 800-1700.  Rather than thinking of these areas in isolation, scholars are revealing the depth of their mutual influence. Trade, war, migration, and scholarly exchange connected Europe and the Middle East in ways both cooperative and adversarial. The distant world was not only an object of aggression, but also, inextricably, of fantasy and longing. Jewish, Muslim, and Christian thinkers looked to each other to understand their own cultural histories and to imagine their futures.  Bringing together art historians, literary scholars, historians, scholars of the history of science, and scholars of religious thought, this interdisciplinary conference will explore the real and imaginary cultural interchanges between Europe and the Middle East during their formative periods. The conference will feature plenary lectures by Professors Nancy Bisaha of Vassar College, and Nabil Matar of the University of Minnesota.
This conference is being organized by Professors Rachel Eisendrath, Najam Haider, and Laurie Postlewate of Barnard College.
Please send an abstract (with title) of approximately 200 words and CV to lpostlew@barnard.edu<mailto:lpostlew@barnard.edu>. Presentations should be 20 minutes. Deadline: April 10, 2016.

CFP: Discipline and Excess (Cambridge Friday, April 15, 2016)

BelliniDISCIPLINE AND EXCESS

A Graduate and Early Career Conference, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge

Friday, April 15, 2016

CFP Deadline:  1st February 2016

We invite paper proposals for Discipline and Excess, a conference which seeks to consider questions relating to boundaries and their transgression until 1750. The theme invites diverse interpretations of “discipline”—moral, religious, cultural, aesthetic, generic, geographic—in papers which explore the realms of penance and perfection, challenge the orderliness implicit in systems of knowledge, or examine the nature of punishment and retribution.

The conference is aimed at early career scholars and graduate students from a range of academic fields. Discipline and Excess is organized by the M.Phil programs in Medieval, Renaissance, and 18th-Century Literature at the Faculty of English. Our external respondent will be Dr. Helen Barr, Associate Professor at the University of Oxford.

Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes. Please email 250-word abstracts (text only, no attachments) by 1st February 2016 to disciplineandexcess2016@gmail.com.

Possible topics may include:

Crime and Punishment

Bounds of the Mind

Feast and Fast

Disciplining the Body

Exceeding the Page

Intertextuality

Sin, Play, Transgression

Rhetorical Limits

Disciplinary Boundaries

Material

CFP Discipline and Excess Cambridge April 2016-2

Post-doc: Mellon Post-Doctorial Fellowships at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies (Toronto)

The Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies is offering post-doctoral Fellowships to be used for research at the Institute in the medieval field of the holder’s choice. The Mellon Fellowships are ibldgntended for young medievalists of exceptional promise who have completed their doctoral work within the previous five years, including those who are starting their professional academic careers. The Fellowships are valued at approximately $35,000 (CDN) and include participation in the interdisciplinary Research Seminars.

Applications for the academic year 2016-2017 should be e-mailed in PDF format (preferred) or as a Word document to the Institute Secretary at barbara.north@utoronto.ca. Reference letters may also be e-mailed directly by the referee to the Institute Secretary. Completed applications and supporting documentation must be received no later than 1 February 2016. The awarding institution must send official confirmation to the postal address below that the PhD has been examined and approved.

Application forms and further details may be obtained from the website at http://www.pims.ca/academics/mellons.html

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies
59 Queen’s Park Crescent East
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M5S 2C4