Tag Archives: religion

CFP: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS): Truth and Fiction, 28-30 June 2018

25e58865266eadd5bdb9a530a627b0db-medieval-art-middle-agesCall for Papers: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS), Truth and Fiction
Deadline: 24 November 2017.

In the wake of the US presidential election and the Brexit referendum, the Oxford English Dictionary chose the expression “post-truth” as its word of the year. This expression underlines the growing tendency to dismiss objective facts in favor of impulsive—and often prejudicial—feelings, frequently supported by “alternative facts.” The contentious relationship between the truth and lies, or truth and fiction, which is currently playing out in the public arena has, in fact, a long-standing legacy—one which can be traced back to the Middle Ages. For this reason, this year’s IMS conference seeks to investigate the variety of different approaches to truth and fiction that existed in the Middle Ages.

One possible avenue of inquiry concerns new ideas of Truth introduced by the Gregorian reforms. On a philosophical and doctrinal level, the idea of the infallibility of the Pope, the “Doctor of Truth,” was introduced by Gregory VII who, taking up the words of Christ, contended that he was the Truth (via, veritas, et vita). From a liturgical and sacramental point of view, on the other hand, we can study contemporary tenets of Eucharistic doctrine as a challenge to common sense as a mystery of human understanding—albeit articulated in rationalist terms. Papers thus might address the manner by which the Gregorian reforms placed the question of truth at the center of the demands of society: by constructing this “ideology of truth,” but also—and above all—by implementing mechanisms like preaching, which spread Truth to Christians, and confession, which introduced the obligation to speak the truth. We are particularly interested in the place and the role of Fictions in these devices (sermons, exempla, vita, etc.).

A second approach to this theme is through language, discourse and narrative forms that aimed to produce a supposed truth. We could examine the relationships between literature and history and their ambiguity with respect to the truth. For example, fictionalized historical narratives throughout the medieval period were frequently thought to be true because they provided a means of decrypting the social order. As John of Salisbury wrote, “even the lies of poets served the Truth.” Papers might explore relationships between truth and fiction through the lens of historical and literary genres (novels, epics, etc.) and the ‘truths’ they produced, placing special emphasis on the way that it was possible to believe the facts related in these works. The importance of these historico-literary fictions—what Paul Veyne called “doctrine in the face of facts”—might also be taken into account.

Law and rhetoric also construct notions of truth. Rhetoric permits the control of the relationship between the author and the audiences of a text and the establishment of the status of a text as veridic, among other things. It can even create direct links between music and words, using metaphor as a means of approaching the truth. Papers could consider, for instance, the virtuosity of the effects of Truth produced by the dictamen or even the quaestio scholastique as a method for establishing Truth with certitude, as well as the place of fiction within these new political languages.

Images throughout the medieval period play a fundamental role in the construction or undermining of truth(s). According to Augustine, the image is not truth, but rather a means of understanding Truth. For him, the work of art renders abstractions concrete using representations hat are both specific and individualized. What is the art object’s role in dispelling truth or decrying falsehoods? Through what formal and material means does it achieve either? Papers might consider the use and forms of medieval diagrams, the role of the art object in spiritual form, etc.

Finally, the conference aims to examine the origins and development of interrogative procedures in the medieval period, in that they illustrate relationships with the truth maintained by medieval societies. We are especially interested in the uses and status of fictive facts in inquisitorial trials, the manner that fictions were revealed during trials, or even how the participation of individuals in inquisitorial trials was viewed as an instrument of legitimization of power and as a way of acknowledging those individuals’ own truths and interpretations of facts.

This great diversity of themes opens participation to researchers working in a variety of different fields and coming from a variety of backgrounds: historians, art historians, musicologists, philosophers, literary scholars, specialists in auxiliary sciences (paleographers, epigraphists, codicologists, numismatists)… While we focus on medieval France, compelling submissions focused on other geographical areas that also fit the conference theme are welcomed. In bringing together such diverse proposals, the IMS conference seeks to take a new look at the notion of Truth, its articulations, and its relationship with Fiction in the medieval world.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words (in French or English) for a 20-minute paper should be sent to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com. Each proposal should be accompanied by full contact information, a CV, and a list of the audio-visual equipment required for the presentation.

The deadline for abstracts is 24 November 2017.

Paper selections will be made by a scientific committee composed of Catherine Croizy-Naquet (Univ. Paris 3/CERAM), Marie Dejoux (Univ. Paris 1/LAMOP), Lindsey Hansen (IMS), Fanny Madeline (LAMOP/IMS), and Valerie Wilhite (Univ. of the Virgin Islands/IMS), as well as the members of the Board of Directors of the IMS.

Please be aware that the IMS-Paris submissions review process is highly competitive and is carried out on a strictly anonymous basis.

The selection committee will email applicants in mid-December to notify them of its decisions. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS-Paris website thereafter.

Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fees (35€ per person, 20€ for students, free for members of LAMOP and CERAM; 10€ membership dues for all participants).

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organization that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For more than a decade, the IMS has served as a center for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work or study. For more information about the IMS-Paris and for past symposium programs, please visit our websites: www.ims-paris.org and https://imsparis.hypotheses.org.

IMS-Paris Graduate Student Prize:

The IMS-Paris is pleased to offer one prize for the best paper proposal by a graduate student. Applications should consist of:

1) a symposium paper abstract

2) an outline of a current research project (PhD dissertation research)

3) the names and contact information of two academic referees

The prize-winner will be selected by the board and a committee of honorary members, and will be notified upon acceptance to the Symposium. An award of 350€ to support international travel/accommodation (within France, 150€) will be paid at the symposium.

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CFP: 2 sessions at the AAH Annual Conference, Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London, 5 – 7 April 2018

350px-hispanomoresqueCall for Papers: Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600)
Deadline: November 1, 2017

The coexistence of Christianity and Islam in the Medieval Mediterranean led to a transfer of knowledge in architecture and material culture which went well beyond religious and geographical boundaries. The use of Islamic objects in Christian contexts, the conversion of churches into mosques and the mobility of craftsmen are only some manifestations of this process. Although studies beginning with Avinoam Shalem’s Islam Christianized (1996), have dealt extensively with Islamic influence in the West and European influence in the Islamic Mediterranean, sacred objects, and material culture more generally, have been relatively neglected. From crosses found in Mosques, to European-Christian coins with pseudo/-shahada inscriptions, medieval material culture is rife with visual evidence of the two faiths co-existing in both individual objects and monuments.
This panel invites papers from scholars working on intercultural exchange in art, architecture and material culture. We particularly welcome contributions that focus on sacred objects that have been diverted or ‘converted’ to a new purpose, whether inside or outside an explicitly religious context.
Papers should present original research, which expands the boundaries of knowledge and which the scholars would like to be considered for publication. Abstracts should be no more than 250 words long. Panel organised by Sami De Giosa, Oxford University and Nikolaos Vryzidis, British School at Athens. Email: aahchristianmuslimpanel2018@gmail.com

maesta700CFP: Art and Law: Objects and Spaces as Legal Actors
DeadlineNovember 6, 2017

Art history has long investigated the role of the law, from issues of visual evidence and legal aesthetics to ideas of artistic originality and authorship. But recent scholarship has increasingly drawn attention to the ways in which art can participate in the law’s actual operation. This session aims to broaden these investigations by tracing the long history of artistic intrusions into legal life, focusing on moments when the objects and spaces of art and architecture, broadly defined, have functioned as legal actors in their own right.
The session promises to explore these ideas through interdisciplinary and cross-chronological case studies from researchers, artists, and practitioners both in art history and in parallel fields such as law, journalism, and the social sciences. How have aesthetic objects past and present actively shaped the production and execution of the law as witnesses or juridical subjects in themselves? How have artists approached the courtroom as a site of artistic production and intervention? And in what ways has aesthetic production sought to short-circuit legal structures or forward alternative, even utopian, legal systems? Such questions have taken on new urgency in light of recent political and constitutional crises worldwide.

Papers might address, amongst other topics:
– historical and contemporary objects that dispense justice
– signs, emblems, or inscriptions that enforced legal boundaries or enacted legal codes
– artworks framed as legal victims, or which have been tried in absentia of criminals
– objects and theories of legal proof
– architectural actors as part of the fabric of legal drama
– art historical or theoretical texts investigating legal production and evidence-gathering and witnessing as forms of aesthetic production and research

Proposals of 250 words, accompanied by a short academic CV, should be sent to the two session organisers no later than 6 November 2017:
Dr Jack Hartnell (University of East Anglia, UK)
j.hartnell@uea.ac.uk
Dr Kevin Lotery (Sarah Lawrence College, USA)
klotery@sarahlawrence.edu

Post-Doc: Post-doctoral researcher for the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide study of its origins, spread and development (Latin evidence), University of Warsaw

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Post-Doc: Post-doctoral researcher for the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide
study of its origins, spread and development (Latin evidence), University of Warsaw
Deadline: 31 September 2017
The Institute of History, University of Warsaw, is seeking to recruit a post-doctoral
researcher for a position in the project The Cult of Saints: a Christendom-wide study of
its origins, spread and development. The Project is supported by an Advanced Grant
from the European Research Council under Grant Agreement Number 340540 and is
based at the University of Oxford with a partnership at the University of Warsaw. The successful candidate will work as part of a team of seven post-doctoral researchers reporting to the Principal Investigator, Prof. Bryan Ward-Perkins (University of Oxford), but under direct supervision of Dr. hab. Robert Wiśniewski (University of Warsaw). The postholder will have responsibility for collecting Latin evidence consisting mostly of literary texts, within an electronic searchable database. The postholder is also expected to produce sole-authored articles on aspects of the cult of saints in the West.
This is a full-time time position for 12 months, starting on 1 November 2017 or soon
thereafter. The postholder will be offered the salary of about 2 700 Euros per month.
For more information about the Project see: http://cultofsaints.history.ox.ac.uk
If you have any questions about the project or the recruitment procedure, please
address them to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl)

Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018

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Islamic Art Circle @ SOAS, London: Lecture Programme, 2017/2018
All lectures begin at 7.00 p.m. in the Khalili Lecture Theatre (Main School Lecture Theatre) –  unless indicated otherwise – Philips Building, SOAS, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

 

  • 11 October 2017: The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings,’ Dr Tom Nickson, Lecturer in Medieval Art and Architecture, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London
  • 15 November 2017: Reviving Islamic Architecture in Khedivial Cairo, and Beyond: a Collector’s Passion, Dr Mercedes Volait, CRNS Research Professor at INHA, Paris
  • 6 December 2017: Takht-e Soleyman/Iran – From Sasanian Fire Temple to Ilkhanid Summer Palace. New Evidence from Old Excavations, Dr Ute Franke,                                       Deputy Director, Museum für Islamische Kunst, Berlin
  • 10 January 2018: The Hadassah and Daniel Khalili Memorial Lecture in Islamic Art and Culture: The Calligrapher, the Painter, and the Patron: A New Perspective on the Freer Khusraw u Shirin, Dr Simon Rettig, Assistant Curator of Islamic Art, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
  • 21 February 2018: In the service of religion? The display of ‘science from the Islamic world’ in the museum, Dr Silke Ackermann, Director, Museum of the History of Science, Oxford
  • 14 March 2018: The Seventh Bahari Foundation Lecture in Iranian Art and Culture: Decagonal and Quasicrystalline Geometry in the Architecture of Medieval Persia and Its Influence in the Greater Islamic World, Dr Peter J. Lu, Department of Physics and SEAS, Harvard University, USA
  • 25 April 2018: Islamic Textiles from Iberia: Re-evaluating Their Role in the Mediterranean Context, Dr Ana Cabrera-Lafuente, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, Victoria and Albert Museum, London
  • 9 May 2018: Ilse Sturkenboom
  • 13 June 2018: Ahmet Ersoy

For further information please contact Rosalind Wade Haddon: 07714087480 or                 rosalindhaddon@gmail.com

 

 

 

Conference: Intertwined Worlds: 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age

Conference: Intertwined Worlds: 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age, Free Library of Philadelphia/University of Pennsylvania Libraries, November 2-4, 2017

In partnership with the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Schoenberg Institute of Manuscript Studies (SIMS) at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries is pleased to announce the 10th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age.

Despite the linguistic and cultural complexity of many regions of the premodern world, religion supplies the basis of a strong material and textual cohesion that both crosses and intertwines boundaries between communities. This symposium will highlight the confluence of expressions of belief, ritual, and social engagement emerging in technologies and traditions of the world’s manuscript cultures, often beyond a single religious context. It will consider common themes and practices of textual, artistic, literary, and iconographic production in religious life across time and geography, from ancient precedents to modern reception and dissemination in the digital age.

The program will begin Thursday evening at 5:00 pm on November 2nd, 2017, at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Parkway Central Library, with a keynote lecture by Phyllis Granoff, Yale University. The symposium will continue November 3rd-4th at the Kislak Center of Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries.

Speakers include:

  • Iqbal Akhtar, Florida International University
  • Paul Dilley, University of Iowa
  • Ellen Gough, Emory University
  • Thibaud d’Hubert, University of Chicago
  • Zsuzsanna Gulácsi, Northern Arizona University
  • Ayesha Irani, University of Massachusetts, Boston
  • Shazia Jagot, University of Surrey
  • Samantha Kelly, Rutgers University
  • Jinah Kim, Harvard University
  • Gila Prebor, Bar-Ilan University
  • Michael Pregill, Boston University
  • Michael Stanley-Baker, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
  • Columba Stewart, Hill Museum & Monastic Library and Saint John’s University
  • Justine Walden, University of Toronto
  • Tyler Williams, University of Chicago
  • Saymon Zakaria, Bangla Academy, Dhaka
  • Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet, Bar-Ilan University

Click here for program and abstracts.


Registration fee will be $35 ($10 for students with valid student ID). Registration open now until Nov 3, 2017. Click here to register. Walk-in registrations will be accepted for a fee of $45 ($15 for students with valid student ID) to be paid in cash.

The symposium is made possible with the generous support of the Center for Ancient Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

For more information on the Schoenberg Symposium Series, click here.

CFP: Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600) at Annual Conference of the Association for Art History, UK, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, UK, 5th-7th April, 2018

800px-french_ciborium_with_rim_engraved_with_arabic_script_and_islamic_inspired_diamond_shaped_pattern_limoges_france_1215_1230Call for Papers: Session on Medieval Eurabia: Religious Crosspollinations in Architecture, Art and Material Culture during the High and Late Middle Ages (1000-1600) at Annual Conference of the Association for Art History, UK, Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London, UK, 5th-7th April, 2018
Deadline:
1st November, 2017

Panel organised by Sami De Giosa, Oxford University and Nikolaos Vryzidis, British
School at Athens
Email: aahchristianmuslimpanel2018@gmail.com
The coexistence of Christianity and Islam in the Medieval Mediterranean led to a
transfer of knowledge in architecture and material culture which went well beyond
religious and geographical boundaries. The use of Islamic objects in Christian
contexts, the conversion of churches into mosques and the mobility of craftsmen are
manifestations of this process. Although studies beginning with Avinoam Shalem’s
Islam Christianized (1996), have dealt extensively with Islamic influence in the West
and European influence in the Islamic Mediterranean, sacred objects, and material
culture more generally, have been relatively neglected. From crosses found in
Mosques, to European-Christian coins with pseudo/-shahada inscriptions, medieval
material culture is rife with visual evidence of the two faiths co-existing in both
individual objects and monuments.
This panel invites papers from scholars working on intercultural exchange in art,
architecture and material culture. We particularly welcome contributions that focus
on sacred objects that have been diverted or ‘converted’ to a new purpose, whether
inside or outside an explicitly religious context.
Papers should present original research, which expands the boundaries of
knowledge and which the scholars would like to be considered for publication.
Abstract should be no more than 250 words long.
 

 

CFP: Medieval Monks, Nuns and Monastic Life, 15-20 July 2018, Bristol

screenshotCall for Papers: Medieval Monks, Nuns and Monastic Life, 21st Biennial Symposium of the International Medieval Sermon Studies Society (IMSSS), 15-20 July 2018, Bristol
Deadline: 30 September 2017
Organizer:
Professor Carolyn Muessig, Head of the University of Bristol’s Department of Religion and Theology and Co-Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS INCLUDE CLAUDIA RAPP (AUSTRIA) AND BRIAN PATRICK McGUIRE (DENMARK)
The 2018 IMSSS symposium will explore the breadth and depth of sermon literature and preaching activity relating to monks, nuns, and monastic life, and serve as a microcosm of the religious and cultural landscape of the Middle Ages.
The symposium will be based in the beautiful grounds of the University of Bristol’s Wills Hall, and will include a workshop at historic Downside Abbey, with its medieval manuscripts, incunables, and Centre for Monastic Heritage.
We will also visit Wells Cathedral, as well as the medieval sites of Bristol.
Celebrate 2018—the first-ever European Year of Cultural Heritage—by delivering a paper or presenting a poster dealing with an aspect of one of the bedrocks of European culture: monasticism
Topics for posters and papers may include:
-the form or content that could distinguish a monastic sermon from others
-monks, nuns, and monasticism in Byzantine or other forms of medieval Eastern and African Christianity
-the Rule of Benedict and preaching
-preaching in monastic churches and chapter houses
-monastic figures preaching in public forums (churches, crusades)
-monastic preaching in or regarding schools and universities
-preaching by and about nuns
de sanctis sermons on holy monks and nuns
-monasticism as treated in sermons
-sermons and the reformed monastic life (e.g., Camaldolese, Carthusian, Celestinian, Cistercian, Cluniac,et alii)
-preaching by and about hermits
-monastic rules in and about preaching
-monastic communities in conflict or in harmony
-monastic rejection/appropriation of mendicant sermons/preaching/identity
-monks as characters in sermons, exempla and religious literature
-gender in monastic preaching
-monks/nuns in ad status sermon literature
-monastic preaching in art
-monks, nuns, and monasticism in pre-modern sermons of religious traditions other than Christianity (e.g. , Islam, Buddhism, Taoism)
-the influence of Christian monks, nuns, & monastic sermons on preaching in other religions
-and more!
How to apply: send your abstracts for papers and posters (150 words) before 30 September 2017 (and any queries) to: imsss-2018@bristol.ac.uk