Tag Archives: Prize

The Malta Historical Society Publication Awards 2018

Deadline: Jun 14, 2018

The Malta Historical Society Publication Awards 2018
Malta Historical Society.jpg
In keeping with the aims and objectives of the Malta Historical Society, namely the study of the history of Malta, the diffusion of its knowledge, and the safeguarding of Maltese historical heritage, the Society will be presenting an award to recognize those publications that have made a distinct contribution to Maltese historical studies. Furthermore, in order to encourage new entrants in the field of historical research, the Society will present an award to recognize first-time publications, which have made a contribution to the field.

The Society will award the following:
– Best paper on Maltese history, which award will be known as the ‘MHS Award for Published Historical Research 2018’.
– Best paper on Maltese history by a first-time / recently published author, which award will be known as the ‘MHS Award for Published Historical Research by Emerging Authors 2018’.
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Prize: Nachwuchspreis des Mediaevistenverbandes (Deadline 30/06/2018)

hb_12-130-1Der Mediävistenverband, der über 1100 Mitglieder aus den unterschiedlichsten Disziplinen mediävistischer Forschung repräsentiert, schreibt zweijährlich einen Nachwuchspreis aus, der mit 2000 € dotiert ist und im März 2019 im Rahmen des Symposiums des Mediävistenverbandes in Tübingen feierlich verliehen wird.

Ausgezeichnet wird eine hervorragende mediävistische Dissertation von interdisziplinärer Bedeutung, die sowohl in der Verbindung unterschiedlicher disziplinärer Ansätze liegen kann als auch in der Anschlussfähigkeit einer disziplinär ausgerichteten Arbeit für mehrere andere Disziplinen. Die Arbeit kann aus allen Fächern der Mittelalterforschung kommen. Die Prüfungen im Promotionsverfahren dürfen am Ende der Bewerbungsfrist nicht mehr als 24 Monate zurückliegen.

Die Bewerbungsunterlagen umfassen:
– eine zweiseitige Zusammenfassung der Arbeit in deutscher oder englischer Sprache, in der auch die interdisziplinäre Bedeutung in einer der oben genannten Perspektiven dargelegt wird, sowie
– vollständige Kopien der Gutachten aus dem Promotionsverfahren. Bewerber/innen aus Ländern, in denen im Promotionsverfahren keine schriftlichen Gutachten erstellt werden, werden gebeten, sich für einen möglichen Ersatz direkt mit dem Präsidenten des Mediävistenverbandes, Prof. Dr. Wolfram Drews, in Verbindung zu setzen (w.drews@uni-muenster.de). Continue reading

Prize: Romanesque Research Award 2018 (Deadline 04/04/2018)

romanesque20

The European Center of the Romanesque (Europäisches Romanik Zentrum, ERZ) awards outstanding international research works on the field of Romanesque art and architecture. The award is donated by the Stiftung Saalesparkasse (Halle) and Mr Gerhard Mauch (Ludwigshafen).

The award aims to promote, honour and encourage graduated junior researchers contributing to the study of Romanesque art, history, archaeology, Church history as well as history of the law.
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CFP: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, April 6-7, 2018

5487225791_f2f9dd3b91CFP: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, April 6-7, 2018
Deadline: 24 November 2017.

Keynote: Elizabeth Allen, University of California, Irvine

The Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University invites proposals for its 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, April 6-7, 2018, in Bloomington, Indiana

Iron maidens, the Inquisition, the Crusades, witch burnings: these images of violence, both fact and fiction, are profoundly connected to the Middle Ages. Yet if in many popular conceptions, the medieval world is associated with brutality and suffering, the period also offers unique formulations of mercy, compassion, and the power of resistance. In exploring both medieval violence or nonviolence, this symposium seeks to examine specific structures of power and brutality but also to complicate the narrative of the violent Middle Ages.

We invite papers on any medieval discipline or region that engage issues of medieval violence and nonviolence: What functions did violence serve in the Middle Ages? How might acts of physical and rhetorical violence against othered groups (gendered, religious, cultural, racial, nonhuman) reflect larger concerns or anxieties within medieval culture? Is there a medieval aesthetic of violence? How does medieval music, art, theology, and literature glorify or critique brutality and/or suffering? How do medieval texts understand the uses and effects of verbal violence? How might medieval violence operate in a metaphorical sense, as violence done to texts or to the material past? What does nonviolence look like in the Middle Ages? Given the functions and pervasiveness of violence, what are some ways in which it is resisted and negotiated? What alternatives do medieval people or institutions offer to violence? How might medieval understandings of mercy or love act as a counter to violence? We also encourage papers on modern representations of the Middle Ages that consider to what extent and to what ends these medievalisms employ violence and nonviolence.

We are also excited to announce that graduate students whose papers have been accepted for the symposium are invited to submit their papers by March 2, 2018 to be considered for the IU Medieval Studies Symposium Paper Prize. Papers will be evaluated by a panel of IU medieval faculty. The prize of $250 will be awarded before the symposium to help defray the cost of travel, and the winner will be noted in the program.

Please submit 200 word abstracts or complete sessions proposals to IUMestSymposium@gmail.com by November 24, 2017.

CFP: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018, Bloomington, Indiana

5487225791_f2f9dd3b91Call for Papers: Force, Resistance, and Mercy: Medieval Violence and Nonviolence, 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, Indiana University, April 6-7, 2018,

Keynote: Elizabeth Allen, University of California, Irvine

The Medieval Studies Institute of Indiana University invites proposals for its 30th Annual Medieval Studies Symposium, April 6-7, 2018, in Bloomington, Indiana

Iron maidens, the Inquisition, the Crusades, witch burnings: these images of violence, both fact and fiction, are profoundly connected to the Middle Ages. Yet if in many popular conceptions, the medieval world is associated with brutality and suffering, the period also offers unique formulations of mercy, compassion, and the power of resistance. In exploring both medieval violence or nonviolence, this symposium seeks to examine specific structures of power and brutality but also to complicate the narrative of the violent Middle Ages.

We invite papers on any medieval discipline or region that engage issues of medieval violence and nonviolence: What functions did violence serve in the Middle Ages? How might acts of physical and rhetorical violence against othered groups (gendered, religious, cultural, racial, nonhuman) reflect larger concerns or anxieties within medieval culture? Is there a medieval aesthetic of violence? How does medieval music, art, theology, and literature glorify or critique brutality and/or suffering? How do medieval texts understand the uses and effects of verbal violence? How might medieval violence operate in a metaphorical sense, as violence done to texts or to the material past? What does nonviolence look like in the Middle Ages? Given the functions and pervasiveness of violence, what are some ways in which it is resisted and negotiated? What alternatives do medieval people or institutions offer to violence? How might medieval understandings of mercy or love act as a counter to violence? We also encourage papers on modern representations of the Middle Ages that consider to what extent and to what ends these medievalisms employ violence and nonviolence.

We are also excited to announce that graduate students whose papers have been accepted for the symposium are invited to submit their papers by March 2, 2018 to be considered for the IU Medieval Studies Symposium Paper Prize. Papers will be evaluated by a panel of IU medieval faculty. The prize of $250 will be awarded before the symposium to help defray the cost of travel, and the winner will be noted in the program.

Please submit 200 word abstracts or complete sessions proposals to IUMestSymposium@gmail.com by November 24, 2017.

CFP: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS): Truth and Fiction, 28-30 June 2018

25e58865266eadd5bdb9a530a627b0db-medieval-art-middle-agesCall for Papers: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS), Truth and Fiction
Deadline: 24 November 2017.

In the wake of the US presidential election and the Brexit referendum, the Oxford English Dictionary chose the expression “post-truth” as its word of the year. This expression underlines the growing tendency to dismiss objective facts in favor of impulsive—and often prejudicial—feelings, frequently supported by “alternative facts.” The contentious relationship between the truth and lies, or truth and fiction, which is currently playing out in the public arena has, in fact, a long-standing legacy—one which can be traced back to the Middle Ages. For this reason, this year’s IMS conference seeks to investigate the variety of different approaches to truth and fiction that existed in the Middle Ages.

One possible avenue of inquiry concerns new ideas of Truth introduced by the Gregorian reforms. On a philosophical and doctrinal level, the idea of the infallibility of the Pope, the “Doctor of Truth,” was introduced by Gregory VII who, taking up the words of Christ, contended that he was the Truth (via, veritas, et vita). From a liturgical and sacramental point of view, on the other hand, we can study contemporary tenets of Eucharistic doctrine as a challenge to common sense as a mystery of human understanding—albeit articulated in rationalist terms. Papers thus might address the manner by which the Gregorian reforms placed the question of truth at the center of the demands of society: by constructing this “ideology of truth,” but also—and above all—by implementing mechanisms like preaching, which spread Truth to Christians, and confession, which introduced the obligation to speak the truth. We are particularly interested in the place and the role of Fictions in these devices (sermons, exempla, vita, etc.).

A second approach to this theme is through language, discourse and narrative forms that aimed to produce a supposed truth. We could examine the relationships between literature and history and their ambiguity with respect to the truth. For example, fictionalized historical narratives throughout the medieval period were frequently thought to be true because they provided a means of decrypting the social order. As John of Salisbury wrote, “even the lies of poets served the Truth.” Papers might explore relationships between truth and fiction through the lens of historical and literary genres (novels, epics, etc.) and the ‘truths’ they produced, placing special emphasis on the way that it was possible to believe the facts related in these works. The importance of these historico-literary fictions—what Paul Veyne called “doctrine in the face of facts”—might also be taken into account.

Law and rhetoric also construct notions of truth. Rhetoric permits the control of the relationship between the author and the audiences of a text and the establishment of the status of a text as veridic, among other things. It can even create direct links between music and words, using metaphor as a means of approaching the truth. Papers could consider, for instance, the virtuosity of the effects of Truth produced by the dictamen or even the quaestio scholastique as a method for establishing Truth with certitude, as well as the place of fiction within these new political languages.

Images throughout the medieval period play a fundamental role in the construction or undermining of truth(s). According to Augustine, the image is not truth, but rather a means of understanding Truth. For him, the work of art renders abstractions concrete using representations hat are both specific and individualized. What is the art object’s role in dispelling truth or decrying falsehoods? Through what formal and material means does it achieve either? Papers might consider the use and forms of medieval diagrams, the role of the art object in spiritual form, etc.

Finally, the conference aims to examine the origins and development of interrogative procedures in the medieval period, in that they illustrate relationships with the truth maintained by medieval societies. We are especially interested in the uses and status of fictive facts in inquisitorial trials, the manner that fictions were revealed during trials, or even how the participation of individuals in inquisitorial trials was viewed as an instrument of legitimization of power and as a way of acknowledging those individuals’ own truths and interpretations of facts.

This great diversity of themes opens participation to researchers working in a variety of different fields and coming from a variety of backgrounds: historians, art historians, musicologists, philosophers, literary scholars, specialists in auxiliary sciences (paleographers, epigraphists, codicologists, numismatists)… While we focus on medieval France, compelling submissions focused on other geographical areas that also fit the conference theme are welcomed. In bringing together such diverse proposals, the IMS conference seeks to take a new look at the notion of Truth, its articulations, and its relationship with Fiction in the medieval world.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words (in French or English) for a 20-minute paper should be sent to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com. Each proposal should be accompanied by full contact information, a CV, and a list of the audio-visual equipment required for the presentation.

The deadline for abstracts is 24 November 2017.

Paper selections will be made by a scientific committee composed of Catherine Croizy-Naquet (Univ. Paris 3/CERAM), Marie Dejoux (Univ. Paris 1/LAMOP), Lindsey Hansen (IMS), Fanny Madeline (LAMOP/IMS), and Valerie Wilhite (Univ. of the Virgin Islands/IMS), as well as the members of the Board of Directors of the IMS.

Please be aware that the IMS-Paris submissions review process is highly competitive and is carried out on a strictly anonymous basis.

The selection committee will email applicants in mid-December to notify them of its decisions. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS-Paris website thereafter.

Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fees (35€ per person, 20€ for students, free for members of LAMOP and CERAM; 10€ membership dues for all participants).

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organization that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For more than a decade, the IMS has served as a center for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work or study. For more information about the IMS-Paris and for past symposium programs, please visit our websites: www.ims-paris.org and https://imsparis.hypotheses.org.

IMS-Paris Graduate Student Prize:

The IMS-Paris is pleased to offer one prize for the best paper proposal by a graduate student. Applications should consist of:

1) a symposium paper abstract

2) an outline of a current research project (PhD dissertation research)

3) the names and contact information of two academic referees

The prize-winner will be selected by the board and a committee of honorary members, and will be notified upon acceptance to the Symposium. An award of 350€ to support international travel/accommodation (within France, 150€) will be paid at the symposium.

Prize: Prix de thèse de la Société française d’histoire urbaine 2017

La Société Française d’Histoire Urbaine (SFHU) ouvre, pour sa 7e session, au titre de l’année 2017, un concours de thèses qui s’adresse aux jeunes docteur.es en histoire urbaine. Par cette initiative, la SFHU vise à encourager de jeunes chercheurs.ses et à favoriser la plus large diffusion possible de leurs travaux (voir les archives du prix de thèse sur le site : http://sfhu.hypotheses.org/la-sfhu/prix-de-these-sfhu).

urbanism

1. Objet du concours

Le.la lauréat.e du concours sera récompensé.e par une somme de 2000 euros.

2. Conditions de participation

Le prix est ouvert aux docteur.es ayant soutenu une thèse d’histoire urbaine, rédigée en français, durant l’année (civile) 2016. Les mémoires d’habilitation à diri­ger des recherches et les thèses de l’École nationale des chartes ne sont pas retenus.

Sont recevables toutes les thèses qui abordent le fait urbain dans son historicité, quels que soient la période, l’espace et la discipline académique (histoire, droit, urbanisme, architecture, histoire de l’art…) concernés.

3. Constitution du dossier de candidature

Pour s’inscrire, le.la docteur.e doit faire acte de candidature en envoyant à la SFHU (voir ci-dessous), un dossier dématérialisé qui comprendra les éléments suivants :

  • le formulaire de candidature (ci-dessous, télécharger ou copier) dûment rempli (en version électronique pdf exclu) ;
  • un résumé de la thèse entre 10 000 et 20 000 signes (en version électronique, traitement de texte, pdf exclu) ;
  • un curriculum vitae (en version électronique) ;
  • une version électronique de la thèse au format pdf (volume maximum souhaité par fichier 10 Mo, dans la mesure du possible ; voir détails ci-dessous).

NB : un accusé de réception du dossier complet sera envoyé aux candidat.es : vérifier sa bonne réception.

4. Procédure d’attribution du prix

Le jury sera composé des membres du bureau de la SFHU. Il examinera l’ensemble des thèses recevables et pourra s’adjoindre des expert.es extérieur.es, français.es et étranger.es.

5. Calendrier

Les candidatures seront enregistrées jusqu’au 5 juin 2017 minuit CET, délai de rigueur

(par voie électronique, à l’adresse Jean-Pierre.Guilhembet@wanadoo.fr).

Les résultats seront proclamés en décembre 2017au plus tard et le prix remis lors de l’AG annuelle et de la journée d’étude de la SFHU de 2018.

6. Fiche de candidature

(ci-après ou fichier à télécharger)

Prix de thèse SFHU 2017 – Fiche de candidature

(merci d’enregistrer VOTRE NOM DANS LE TITRE DU FICHIER avant transmission et de ne pas utiliser le format pdf pour ce fichier-ci)

NOM :
Prénom :
Adresse :
Téléphone :
E-mail :
Situation professionnelle :
Intitulé de la thèse :
Date de soutenance :(rappel : la thèse doit avoir été soutenue durant l’année civile 2016)
Université ou établissement de rattachement :
Nom du.de la. des directeur.e.s de recherche :
Membres du jury de soutenance : (un nom par ligne)

Source : Société française d’histoire urbaine