Tag Archives: philosophy

Conference: The Right Moment. A Symposium on Kairotic Energies, Brussels, 18-19 October 2018

church-of-the-holy-nativity-631The Greek term kairós expresses an idea of ‘grasping the right moment’, which travelled through art, literature, and philosophy. And even today, it is central to debates over, for example, time management. Combining perspectives from classical reception studies and iconology, this ongoing project at KU Leuven (2017-2021) is about the reception of kairós in the visual medium from antiquity to the Renaissance. How was the notion of kairós visualized in images throughout time, from antiquity to the early modern era? And more specifically, how did text and image work together to transform the notion of kairós in various contexts?

The attending speakers from Belgium, Germany, France, Israel, Croatia, The Netherlands, Romania, The United Kingdom, The United States, and Switzerland have not only been selected on the basis of their interdisciplinary skills in the field; but equally because of their distinctive contribution to the method of iconology and visual anthropology.

Many among them are key influencers on, among other things, the importance of the Humanities in terms of peace process work, ecology, and the relationship between Eastern and Western civilizations.

Barbara Baert – Kunstwetenschappen KU Leuven – www.illuminare.be

PROGRAM

Thursday, 18 October

08.30-09.00 Registration

09.00-09.15 Welcome speech by Pierre Van Moerbeke,
Executive director of Francqui Foundation

09.15-09.30 Welcome speech by Luc Sels, Rector of KU
Leuven

09.30-10.00 Introduction by Barbara Baert

10.00-10.30 Coffee break

Part I
10.30-11.30 Giotto, the Eye and the Gaze – Victor Stoichita
Respondent: Herman Parret

11.30-12.30 Time in the Context of Ecclesia/Synagoga – Miri Rubin
Respondent: Inigo Bocken

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part II
14.00-15.00 Epochal Madness: Notes on the Present Moment – W. J. T. Mitchell
Respondent: Stéphane Symons

15.00-16.00 The Manic Moment – Davide Stimilli
Respondent: Hedwig Schwall

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 The Silence of Lifta – Avinoam Shalem
Respondent: Amr Ryad

17.30-18.15 Presentation of the new series Recollection: Experimental Reflections on Texts, Images and Ideas – Veerle De Laet (Leuven University Press) & Ellen Harlizius-Klück

Friday 19 October

08.30-09.00 Welcome & coffee

Part III
09.00-10.00 The Nativity Church in Bethlehem as Kairotic
Space – Bianca Kühnel
Respondent: Marina Vicelja-Matijašic

10.00-11.00 L’occasion de la grâce dans le martyre – Pierre Antoine Fabre
Respondent: Ralph Dekoninck

11.00-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.30 A Dialogue of Early Buddhism, Hinduism and
Jainism on the Varieties of Auspicious Moments – Eugen Ciurtin
Respondent: Reimund Bieringer

12.30-14.00 Lunch

Part IV
14.00-15.00 Generating Synchronicity: Bodily and Affective
Techniques – Elisabeth Hsu
Respondent: Philippe Van Cauteren

15.00-16.00 The Moment of the Dangerous Women – Catherine Harper
Respondent: Ann-Sophie Lehmann

16.00-16.30 Coffee break

16.30-17.30 Concluding remarks – Han Lamers & Bart Verschaffel

17.30-18.00 Book presentations: Paul Peeters (Peeters Publishers) & Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art

18.00-19.30 Farewell drinks

Contact and registration: stephanie.heremans@kuleuven.be
Registration deadline: 30 September 2018

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CFP: Re-defining the Monster

poster_monster_01.jpgCall for Papers for Special Session at the

International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS 2019)

May 9 to 12, 2019

Western Michigan University

The proposed session will discuss and debate on the various definitions of the concept of the “monster.” Defining the monster is a challenge. Monsters and monstrosity-related aspects have been topics of academic research either connected to identity or cross-cultural encounters, explored as ‘others’ in the context of voyages (real-imagined), as heritage from Antiquity, as races reflected in travellers’ reports inserted into Western art, philosophy, and theology.

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CFP: Early Career Workshop in Medieval Intellectual History, All Soul’s College, Oxford, 22 March 2018

38df198add37e18fb750927fc44ef630CfP: Early Career Workshop in Medieval Intellectual History, All Soul’s College, Oxford, 22 March 2018
Deadline: 30 November 2017

Early career scholars, including current and recent PhD students, are warmly invited to submit a proposal for a brief presentation on their research of 10-15 minutes. The workshop will be held in the Old Library at All Soul’s College, Oxford and is organized by Dr Lydia Schumacher, Visiting Fellow at the College, Senior Lecturer in Medieval Philosophy and Theology at King’s College London, and Principal Investigator of a European Research Council project titled, ‘Authority and Innovation in Early Franciscan Thought.’ A certain number of spaces will be reserved for participants from Oxford University and King’s College London, but submissions are welcome from members of any other university. To propose a paper, please submit an abstract of up to 200 words by 30 November 2017 to Tom J. Savage (thomas.savage@kcl.ac.uk)

 

Post-doc: 3 positions at the University of Louvain, ‘The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission’

photoPost-doc: 3 position, 3-year contracts, ERC Advanced project 740618: The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission (2017-2022), Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium
Deadline: 10 November 2017

PhilAnd is a five-year Advanced ERC project to start in October 2017 at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) under the supervision of Prof. Godefroid de Callataÿ. The objective of PhilAnd is to conduct a large-scale exploration of how, and under which form, philosophy appeared for the first time in al-Andalus. At the crossroads of several major lines of enquiries in modern scholarship and in line with recent discoveries having important chronological implications, PhilAnd focuses on the 10th century, a period usually disregarded by historians on the assumption that philosophy as such was not cultivated in the Iberian Peninsula before the 11th-12th centuries. Its originality is also to put emphasis on ‘ill-defined’ materials and channels of transmission, a field which remains largely unexplored. PhilAnd will be conducted in partnership with the Warburg Institute (University of London).
As part of this project, three post-doc positions of three years each (to start from 2 January 2018) are offered at the UCL in relation with the three following sub-projects (SP):
1) the Ikhwān al-afā’: This SP will aim at producing a comprehensive survey of all the elements which are likely to inform us about the chronology of redaction and – where applicable – of introduction into al-Andalus of the three works that have commonly been ascribed in sources to this most influential group of thinkers known as Ikhwān al-Ṣafā’ (‘The Brethren of Purity’), namely: a) the Rasā’il (‘the Epistles’); b) the Risāla Jāmi‘a (‘The Comprehensive Epistle’) and, c) the Risāla Jāmi‘at al-Jāmi‘a (‘The Super-Comprehensive Epistle’). This chronology is currently far from clear.
2) Ibn Washiyya and the Nabatean Corpus: This SP aims to evaluate the impact of the Filāḥa Nabaṭiyya (‘The Nabatean Agriculture’), a complex and enigmatic Arabic treatise on agriculture written in the Orient, on the development of both Islamic and Jewish Neoplatonism in al-Andalus from the 10th to the 12th century. The focus will be on the reception of the ‘philosophical’ and bāṭinī (rather than agronomical) aspects of the work, with the aim of understanding why this notoriously esoteric work remained so influential even to Jewish thinkers like Judah Halevi and Maimonides.
3) Ibn Masarra: This SP will lead to the first monograph entirely devoted to Ibn Masarra’s Kitāb khawāṣṣ al-ḥurūf (‘The Book of the Properties of Letters’), consisting of an extensively annotated translation of this mystical treatise, together with an in-depth exploration of its place in the history of ‘ilm al-ḥurūf, the Islamic science of letters – including its links with the Jewish Kabbala – up to the time of Ibn ‘Arabī. This will fill an important gap and provide a valuable resource for the study of Islamic mysticism in al-Andalus.

The qualifications required for any of these sub-projects are:

  1. a PhD in Islamic Studies, in Middle Eastern Studies, or related fields;
  2. an excellent command of Classical Arabic (the knowledge of additional languages such as ancient Greek, Latin and in particular Hebrew is considered an advantage);
  3. a first-rate track record and research experience;
  4. publications of articles in peer-reviewed international journals or monographs with recognized academic publishers;
  5. academic writing and presentation skills in English (the working language of the project);
  6. the ability to work both individually and as part of a team.

These three post-doc positions are full-time equivalent. They are offered for a period of 12 months, renewable twice (three years in total) upon good performance. The post-docs retained will be required to reside in Belgium for the whole period of their fellowship. They will be asked to contribute to the intellectual life of the ERC project and of the UCL.


How to apply?

Applications should be made via pdf files and contain the following:

(1) a cover letter setting out the candidate’s qualifications and motivation for applying for one of the three positions offered (maximum 2 pages);

(2) a curriculum vitae (maximum 3 pages);

(3) a list of publications;

(4) two samples of published work (articles, chapters) in pdf (preferably in English);

(5) a transcript of grades and/or copy of the PhD certificate;

(6) the name (with title, affiliation and email) of four people who have accepted to be contacted as potential referees.
Applications should be made electronically and sent to the following address:

godefroid.decallatay@uclouvain.be

The application deadline is 10 November 2017
Interviews will be arranged between 4 and 6 December 2017.

Candidates selected for the interviews will be contacted by mid-November 2017, and asked to write a short research design on a topic to be announced at that moment.

Employment should become effective from 2 January 2018.

CFP: The Image of the Multitude in Art and Philosophy (London, 10 Mar 18)

medieval peasant revolts.jpgThe Courtauld Institute of Art, London., March 10, 2018
Deadline: Sep 15, 2017

Imago Multitudinis. The Image of the Multitude in Art and Philosophy

An International Conference at the Courtauld Institute of Art London, on the 10th of March.

The Courtauld Institute of Art, The British Academy and the Collège International de Philosophie are pleased to announce a one-day interdisciplinary conference focusing on the philosophical representation and the artistic conceptualisation of the multitude and its associated concepts: the many, the masses, the crowd, the mob and the commonality.

A spectre is haunting our times: the spectre of the multitude. Uprisings, popular unrests, mass migrations, revolutions—the past ten years have been marked by unprecedented quests for freedom, embodied by unconventional political subjects pointing to the possibility of alternative outcomes of the crisis of both authoritarian regimes and representative democracies. Through the masterful drawing of Abraham Bosse, Hobbes attempted to tame the multitude forever. Constrained within the body politic of the monstrous Leviathan (1651), the multitude was transfigured into an obedient people and its potentia was (apparently) usurped. Yet, the multitude resisted—and still resists—this movement, challenging the predominant definitions of sovereignty. Following the collapse of modern master narratives, such as in the nascent seventeenth century, the multitude has returned.

Our investigation revolves around the political and aesthetic meanings of this omnipresent, if elusive, collective being. In particular, we would like to ask the following questions: how do philosophers represent the multitude and translate their concepts into cogent images? How do artists think about the multitude and its agency? This enquiry, which spans from the Middle Ages to the present, concentrates on the way in which images and iconographic motifs are elaborated in philosophy, as well as how political concepts are articulated in the visual arts. In order to understand the images pervading, and the concepts informing, recent collective political action (from Tahrir Square to the streets of Tunis, New York, Madrid, Ferguson via Rojava and Lampedusa), we intend to focus on their modern and contemporary genealogies. This is not only a historical enquiry. The history of the multitude can help us better understand the present. The aesthetic, agency and ambitions of this political subject do not only survive in books and museums, they also live on among us. The multitude resists, and if this is the conflict that characterises political modernity, then modernity has begun again.

Invited speakers: Horst Bredekamp (Humboldt-Universität); Claire Fontaine (artist); Sandro Mezzadra (Università di Bologna).

We invite submissions on the following topics including, but not limited to:
– Political iconography (from the Revolt of the Ciompi to the Arab Spring via the German Peasants’ War),
– Feminism and the multitude,
– The multitude in the USSR,
– The multitude and the English Civil Wars,
– Hobbes’ Behemoth,
– Spinoza’s, Machiavelli’s, Negri’s, Deleuze’s and Schmitt’s depictions of the multitude,
– The “popular hydra” in nineteenth-century Paris,
– Baroque and the multitude,
– The multitude and migrations in contemporary art.

Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 500 words together with a short CV to jacopo.galimberti@manchester.ac.uk by the 15th of September. Successful candidates will be notified in early October. Papers should not exceed 25 minutes in length.

CFP: Warburg Institute Postgraduate Symposium (17 November 2016)

b84e669807Cultural Encounters:

Tensions and Polarities of Transmission from the Late Middle Ages to the Enlightenment

17 November 2016

The Warburg Institute will host its first Postgraduate Symposium on 17 November 2016. It will explore the concept of cultural encounters and focus particularly on their productive outcomes. We are interested, above all, in the dynamics of cultural change across time and space. The Symposium will be multidisciplinary, and will cover topics that fall into the unique classification system of the Warburg Library: Image, Word, Orientation and Action.

The aim of the Symposium will be to map the diverse and intricate forces which have driven cultural encounters in the past and which also help define contemporary societies. Amongst the questions that we hope to address are: the degree to which productive outcomes can be seen as a conscious reception and reformulation of external ideas and models; resistances to exchange and in what form; the long-term implications of such encounters and their outcomes.

The Symposium is intended for postgraduate students and early career researchers. It will bring together speakers from different backgrounds in the humanities and draw on a variety of disciplinary tools and methodologies. Submissions are invited across a wide range of topics represented by the global cultural interests of the Warburg Institute, including but not limited to:

* Artistic creations: forms, models, styles;

* Literary productions and transmission of texts: translations, adaptations, copies;

* Philosophy, rhetoric and transmission of ideas;

* Personal encounters: Academies, universities and epistolary exchanges;

* Encounters with the ancient past: reception, interpretation, visualisation;

* Religious encounters, propaganda and politics;

* Geographical discoveries: new continents, new cultures and animal species, etc.

* Scientific innovation: findings, theories, inner contradictions, etc.

Proposals for papers should be sent to warburg.postgrad(at)gmail.com by 31 May 2016:

* Maximum 300-word abstract, in English, for a 20-minute paper, in PDF or Word format.

* One-page CV, including full name, affiliation, contact information.

All candidates will be notified by 31 July 2016. Limited funding to help cover travel expenses is available. Attendance is free of charge.

For more information and news about The Warburg Institute Postgraduate Symposium 2016 visit https://warburgpostgrad.wordpress.com/

Organisers: Desirée Cappa, Maria Teresa Chicote Pompanin, James Christie, Lorenza Gay, Hanna Gentili, Federica Gigante, Finn Schulze-Feldmann.

CFP: Marian Iconography East and West (Rijeka, 2-4 June 2016)

Deadline: Mar 30, 2016

DuccioTenth International Conference of Iconographic Studies
Center for Iconographic Studies – University of Rijeka (Croatia) in collaboration with:
Study of Theology in Rijeka, University of Zagreb (Croatia)
University of Thessaly (Greece)
University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)
Gregorian Pontifical University Rome (Italy)

The conference seeks to explore and discuss recent development in the dialogue between theology, art history, philosophy and cultural theory concerning the iconography of Mary in Eastern and Western art. We welcome academic papers that will approach this subject in an interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse way. The themes and subjects can include the following:

– early representations of Mary
– images of intercession and authority
– devotional iconography
 Mary Mother of God
– Virgin as queen
– Mary as Ecclesia
– Mary and Eve
– Life of the Virgin
– post-Tridentine iconography
– hermeneutical and phenomenological aspects of Mary

Paper proposals should be submitted electronically to cis@ffri.hr
A paper proposal should contain:
1. full name, institution, affiliation, address, phone number(s),
e-mail address
2. title
3. abstract (maximum 2 pages – 500 words)

Invitations to participate will be sent out by email before April 15,
2016
There is NO registration fee
Administration and organizational costs, working materials, lunch and
coffee breaks during conference as well as all organized visits are
covered by the organizers.
All presented papers will be published in the thematic issue of the
IKON journal in May 2017.

Please contact us for any additional information.
Contact person:
Sanja Jovanović
Center for Iconographic Studies
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Rijeka
Sveucilisna avenija 4
51 000 Rijeka
Croatia
E-mail: cis@ffri.hr

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Marian Iconography East and West (Rijeka, 2-4 Jun 16). In:
H-ArtHist, Jan 7, 2016. <http://arthist.net/archive/11897>.