Tag Archives: Postgraduate

Conference: Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era, London, November 8–9, 2018

slid-charlatanesVenue: Senate House, Bedford Room 37 (8th Nov); Bush House, KCL S2.01 and Instituto Cervantes (9th Nov)

Keynote speakers: Prof Trevor Dadson and Dr Alexander Samson

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.

Click here for a full programme and here to book tickets

Organisers: Roser López Cruz (King’s College London) and Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Conference website: https://iberianintolerance.com

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CFP: ICMA sponsored session: ‘MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit,’ Leeds International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1–4 July 2019

1024px-vase_de_cristal_d27alic3a9norDeadline: 21 September 2018

MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit, Leeds International Medieval Congress (thematic strand: Materialities), University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1-4 July 2019

Sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee
Organized by D. Esther Kim (Toronto),  Maggie Crosland (Courtauld), and Xin Yue (Sylvia) Wang (Toronto)

The materials of the medieval artist, artisan, and architect were constantly on the move, travelling from one part of the globe to another through trade, gifting, looting, or theft. Likewise, the localized techniques of working with materials and media could travel near and far, through the movement of artists and objects, as well as written and visual descriptions such as artist manuals and travel guides.

While on the move, travelling materials such as stone and marble, metals, fur, textiles, coral, ivory, and pigment—and techniques of working with these materials—might retain their original meanings and function; or they could be integrated with local media, refined, or even significantly transformed to something drastically different, to suit the ideologies and ambitions of their destination.

This panel aims to engage with materials and techniques in transit, as well as the (trans)regionality of their meanings and significations, by asking: are we still able to trace the ‘origin’ and ‘originality’ of certain materials, techniques, and their meanings? How then would the fluidity and transformation of techniques affect our understanding when we are trying to ascribe a certain technique to a particular culture or region? How are old, new, and combined meanings assessed and understood in the Middle Ages and in scholarship today?

Possible topics of discussion include, but are not limited to: global movements and dissemination of artists and/or their materials and techniques; modes of transmission; regional/transregional meaning and significance of materials and techniques; reuse and repurposing of existing materials and/or artworks; reasons for shifts in meaning and function of materials within and outside particular regions; the integration of materials and medium, and intermediality; trans-temporal/ trans-regional use of spolia, among others.

How to apply: We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from graduate student ICMA members, and encourage interdisciplinary submissions from students researching all parts of the globe from c.400-c.1500. To propose a paper, please send a title, abstract of up to 250 words, and CV to the organizers (de.kim@mail.utoronto.ca, margaret.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk, xw388@nyu.edu) by 21 September, 2018.

The International Center for Medieval Art Student Committee involves and advocates for all members of the ICMA with student status and facilitates communication and mentorship between student and non-student members.

Conference: New Dialogues in Art History, The Warburg Institute, London, September 26, 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f472296712f2640004419952f12foriginalThis one day conference brings together the next generation of art history scholars to present and discuss their ongoing research. Papers will predominately focus on Italian and Northern Renaissance Art (c. 1400–1600) and will encompass diverse media including tapestry, painting, engraving and stained glass. The conference will comprise five sessions. In the first four, two PhD students (or recent graduates) will present on topics that are united by common themes such as patronage, attribution and materiality. The final session, entitled ‘Opening New Dialogues’, will feature a paper by Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director and former PhD student at The Warburg). In order to foster the intellectual exchange central to ‘New Dialogues in Art History’ , the key paper(s) of each session will be followed by 20 minutes discussion.

Organised by Genevieve Verdigel & Lydia Goodson. Please direct any enquiries to the organisers at: NewArtDialogues@gmail.com

Programme

10:00–10:15: Registration

10:15–10:30: Introduction: Lydia Goodson and Genevieve Verdigel

10:30–11:30: Session 1: Making and Materiality
Chair: Alexander Röstel (Courtauld Institute / The National Gallery)
– Ang Li (University of Oxford): ‘The Revival of Gold Ground in Late Fifteenth-Century Italian Paintings.’
– Benedetta Pacini (University of Warwick/ The National Gallery): ‘Making and Moving Venetian Renaissance Paintings: my interviews with chief restorers in Venice and London, and archival records about Tintoretto’s transport strategy.’

11:30–11:45: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

11:45–12:45: Session 2: Attribution and Authorship
Chair: Dr Olenka Horbatsch (British Museum; PhD 2017, University of Toronto)
– James Wehn (Case Western Reserve University/ The Cleveland Museum of Art): ‘The Maker’s Image: Israhel van Meckenem, His Name, and His Copies.’
– Catherine Spirit (University of York): ‘Weaving Light: Untangling Authorship in the Windows of All Saints Church, Earsham.’

12:45–13:45: Lunch (Provided for Speakers and Chairs)

13:45–14:45: Session 3: Prestige and Patronage
Chair: Adriana Concin (Courtauld Institute)
– Dr Ilaria Taddeo (PhD 2017, IMT School for Advanced Studies, Lucca): ‘Artistic Patronage, Family Prestige and Religious Politics. The case of the Guidiccioni between Lucca and Rome (c. 1530-1550).’
– Anne-Sophie Laruelle (University of Liège): ‘Reconsidering Tapestry Patronage and Trade in the Renaissance.’

14:45–15:00: Break (Tea and Coffee Provided)

15:00–16:00: Session 4: Itinerancy and Interchange
Chair: Lois Haines (Warburg Institute / The National Gallery)
– Giulio Dalvit (Courtauld Institute): ‘Circulation of Drawings in Castiglione Olona: Masolino, Paolo Schiavo, Vecchietta, Domenico Veneziano and Cyriacus of Ancona.’
– Matthew Whyte (University College, Cork): ‘Stylistic Exchange and Civic Identity in Michelangelo’s work on the Arca di San Domenico in Bologna.’

16:05–16:55: Session 5: Opening New Dialogues
– Professor Michelle O’Malley (Deputy Director, Warburg Institute): ‘The Specifics of Authorship: Attributing Production.’

16:55–17:00: Concluding Remarks
17:00–18:00: Reception

Free and Open to all. Advanced booking required via Eventbrite.

Job: Lectureship in Medieval History, UCL

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UCL History is seeking to appoint an exceptional candidate to the post of  ‘Lectureship in Medieval History’. We welcome applications from scholars doing research of the highest quality and able to teach successfully at both undergraduate and taught graduate levels, and in due course to attract doctoral students. You will be expected to teach modules of your own devising, that relate to your area of specialism; in addition you will contribute to a ‘team taught’ first year undergraduate core course. You will convene the module ‘Manuscripts and Documents’ (MA Medieval and Renaissance Studies) as well as developing an MA module which relates to your own field of research.

We welcome applications from historians working on any aspect of medieval history (from c. 1100 on), in order to complement existing areas of strength within the department. The department seeks to build on its considerable strength in the field of medieval history, in terms of both range and depth. We are looking for demonstrable strength in palaeography and diplomatic, as well as strong working knowledge not just of medieval Latin but also of the key scholarly languages in the field, including French and German.
Click here for more information
Deadline: 7 Sep 2018 at 23:59

Call for Papers The University of Birmingham EMREM Postgraduate Forum 8th Annual Symposium Truth, Lies and Deception Deadline 03/03/2018

EMREM

We invite all postgraduates working on the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods to submit papers for and attend our 8th Annual Symposium at the University of Birmingham on Thursday 17th and Friday 18th May 2018.

This interdisciplinary 2-day event welcomes papers and/or images of research from History, Literature, Archaeology, Art-History and Music.

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Postdoc and PhD Scholarships, Novo Nordisk Foundation Denmark

novo-nordisk-fondenPostdoc and PhD Scholarships, Novo Nordisk Foundation Denmark
Application deadline
: Jan 18, 2018

Call for applications for postdoc and Ph.D. scholarships in art history

The Novo Nordisk Foundation in Denmark calls for applications for Mads Øvlisen Postdoctoral Fellowships and Mads Øvlisen PhD Scholarships within art history, practice-based artistic research and art & natural sciences.

Four postdoc fellowships in total are available for funding. Applicants must be anchored at a university, museum or other knowledge institution in Denmark during the grant period. The fellowships run for two years and amount to DKK 1.5 million covering salary, operational costs and administrative fee.

Five PhD scholarships in total are available for funding. Applicants must be enrolled at a university in Denmark and anchored at a host institution in Denmark. The scholarships run for three years and amount to DKK 2 million covering salary, operational costs and administrative fee,.

Applications must be completed and submitted using the foundation’s application system, which can be accessed via the foundation’s website.

More information, guidelines for the application process and eligibility can be found on the foundation’s website:
http://novonordiskfonden.dk/en/content/investigator-grant-art-history-research
http://novonordiskfonden.dk/en/content/project-grants-art-history-research

Call for Applications: International Fellowship Program at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

nationalgalerie-logoCall for Applications: International Fellowship Program at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Deadline:  31 December 2017
Launched in 2009, the International Fellowship Program (ISP) offers the opportunity to international researchers, especially early career scholars, to conduct research at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.
The program supports projects that are directly related with the diverse institutions and the rich collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. The fellowships, which can be held to up to three months, allow researchers to work on their individual projects and to establish professional contacts at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. The program aims to strengthen the position of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin in the international research network and therefore specifically addresses scholars who do not reside in Germany. The fellows will also gain the opportunity to participate in the academic and cultural life at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz.

The applicants must hold at least a first university degree (M.A. or equivalent degree) by the time of the application.

Guidelines and  Request form:
http://www.smb.museum/forschung/stipendienprogramme/internationales-stipendienprogramm.html

Other institutions, which are part of the Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz (the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, the Geheime Staatsarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz, the Staatliche Institut für Musikforschung, and the Ibero-American Institute), offer similar fellowship opportunities. For more information, click here.

Please submit your application in one PDF file by 31.12. 2017 to forschung@smb.spk-berlin.de

For queries on the program please consult the website
http://www.smb.museum/en/research/scholarship-programmes/international-scholarship-programme.html
or contact
forschung@smb.spk-berlin.de