Tag Archives: Postgraduate

Call for Papers The University of Birmingham EMREM Postgraduate Forum 8th Annual Symposium Truth, Lies and Deception Deadline 03/03/2018

EMREM

We invite all postgraduates working on the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods to submit papers for and attend our 8th Annual Symposium at the University of Birmingham on Thursday 17th and Friday 18th May 2018.

This interdisciplinary 2-day event welcomes papers and/or images of research from History, Literature, Archaeology, Art-History and Music.

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Postdoc and PhD Scholarships, Novo Nordisk Foundation Denmark

novo-nordisk-fondenPostdoc and PhD Scholarships, Novo Nordisk Foundation Denmark
Application deadline
: Jan 18, 2018

Call for applications for postdoc and Ph.D. scholarships in art history

The Novo Nordisk Foundation in Denmark calls for applications for Mads Øvlisen Postdoctoral Fellowships and Mads Øvlisen PhD Scholarships within art history, practice-based artistic research and art & natural sciences.

Four postdoc fellowships in total are available for funding. Applicants must be anchored at a university, museum or other knowledge institution in Denmark during the grant period. The fellowships run for two years and amount to DKK 1.5 million covering salary, operational costs and administrative fee.

Five PhD scholarships in total are available for funding. Applicants must be enrolled at a university in Denmark and anchored at a host institution in Denmark. The scholarships run for three years and amount to DKK 2 million covering salary, operational costs and administrative fee,.

Applications must be completed and submitted using the foundation’s application system, which can be accessed via the foundation’s website.

More information, guidelines for the application process and eligibility can be found on the foundation’s website:
http://novonordiskfonden.dk/en/content/investigator-grant-art-history-research
http://novonordiskfonden.dk/en/content/project-grants-art-history-research

Call for Applications: International Fellowship Program at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin

nationalgalerie-logoCall for Applications: International Fellowship Program at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
Deadline:  31 December 2017
Launched in 2009, the International Fellowship Program (ISP) offers the opportunity to international researchers, especially early career scholars, to conduct research at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin.
The program supports projects that are directly related with the diverse institutions and the rich collections of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. The fellowships, which can be held to up to three months, allow researchers to work on their individual projects and to establish professional contacts at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. The program aims to strengthen the position of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin in the international research network and therefore specifically addresses scholars who do not reside in Germany. The fellows will also gain the opportunity to participate in the academic and cultural life at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin and the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz.

The applicants must hold at least a first university degree (M.A. or equivalent degree) by the time of the application.

Guidelines and  Request form:
http://www.smb.museum/forschung/stipendienprogramme/internationales-stipendienprogramm.html

Other institutions, which are part of the Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz (the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, the Geheime Staatsarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz, the Staatliche Institut für Musikforschung, and the Ibero-American Institute), offer similar fellowship opportunities. For more information, click here.

Please submit your application in one PDF file by 31.12. 2017 to forschung@smb.spk-berlin.de

For queries on the program please consult the website
http://www.smb.museum/en/research/scholarship-programmes/international-scholarship-programme.html
or contact
forschung@smb.spk-berlin.de

Deadline 15 November: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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Deadline Extended: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 15 November 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 15 November 2017.

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CFP: International Graduate Students Colloquium, “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries)”, Amiens (France) 29-30 May 2018

afficheCall For Papers: International Graduate Students Colloquium, “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries),” Amiens (France), 29-30 May 2018
Deadline: 15 January 2018

The research laboratory Trame (Texts, Representations, Archaeology and Memory from Antiquity to the Renaissance) of the University of Picardie Jules Verne associated with the research unit Transitions. Middle Ages and First Modernity (University of Liège) and with the Center for Advanced Studies in the Renaissance of the University François Rabelais (Tours) is organising three international meetings implemented by PhD students of these three institutions. the aim of the meetings is to enable exchanges and discussions between PhD students, junior researchers and experimented colleagues.

The first meeting will be held in Liège on Tuesday the 30th of January and Wednesday the 31st of January 2018 on the theme “Transition(s): concept, methods and case studies (14th-17th centuries)”.

The second meeting will be held in Amiens on Tuesday the 29 th of May and Wednesday the 30rd of May 2018 on the theme : “Why did they choose this place? Settlements, Representations and References of Buildings and Objects (11th-17th centuries)”

This colloquium will be divided into two parts: first, the choice of the place of the building, and then the choice of the place of the object.
The construction of a new building usually start with an important thinking concerning the localization. The choice is strategic or symbolic, sometimes both, and depend on its function, its sponsor and its geographical context. For example, a monastery will set up on a secluded place or, in the contrary, on an urban center; a military fortress must occupy a strategic place to dominate a territory etc. In this way, it’s interesting to study all these factors, actors and issues regarding the establishment process in a rural, urban or suburban context. In the same way, objects (such as paintings, sculptures, precious objects, reliquaries, pieces of jewellery, funerary monuments, pieces of furniture, symbols of power etc.) are interesting to study. A lot of them need to be placed on a specific location, whether it’s in a real place or in the composition of a bidimensional work. The place where the object is arranged can be modified in consequence as there
are interactions between them. The goal of this meeting is to gauge the notion of place in all its forms in order to understand its meaning and its importance during the Middle Ages and First Modernity.

Day 1: The place of the Building
This first day will be focused on the buildings. The statements have to match the three
following approaches:
– The location choices of the edifice: how the place was chosen? Who were the actors of this choice? What were the effects of this implantation on a local and global historical context? Studies could focus on a specific place, a religious community, an edifice or an archaeological site. It’s a matter of showing the location strategies and the territorial transformations after the creation of a new “place of power” or a place of production in a historical and geographical context.
– The place‘s portrayal is the second theme: why did they choose this place? How is it
represented and why? Are they accurate the original place? How fictive places are show? The statements have to consider the different means used to point out peculiar location and the underlying goals.
– The place’s references in the sources: how literature and manuscripts mention those places whether real or fictive? What is the purpose in those texts? In an illuminated book, how is introduced the description of the place and what are the connections between the picture and the text? The statements could cover the evolution of the terms used to qualify a place. For example, the Latin word “prioratus” is barely used to qualify a priory between the 11th and the 13th centuries in manuscripts but we find lot of others words like house, farm, church etc.

Day 2: The place of the object
Concerning the place of the object we propose the three following themes:
– The position of the object:  usually, special objects are put in specific places: a building, a public space or a private one, or even a tomb. It would be interesting to attempt to understand why those objects have been placed in well-chosen areas, which were the factors and the issues according to which this decision has been made and by who. The history of the different places in which an object dating back to the 11th to the 17th century has been settled from his creation up to the present time can be made through a historiographical perspective. Reflections focusing on the methods used by historians, historians of arts or archaeologists to identify the original place of an object are
welcomed.
– Interaction between the object and the place: the goal is to think about the conjoint and
disjointed evolution of the building and the object: which are the impacts of the mutations and the intern reconstructions of the building on the object? How a building can specifically be built to accommodate one or several objects? This theme concerns both religious and public spaces, but also private places and the first experiences in museum architecture linked to a collection. Once again, all reflections about the methodology used to understand those interactions are welcomed.
– Representation of the object in paintings, illuminated manuscripts and sculptures: this
third theme invite to wonder about the methods used to represent the object on pieces of art. How is it put on the spot when it plays a central role in the pieces of art? How an object can be used to build up the composition of a picture?

Contribution Modalities
Lectures should relate to history, archaeology, history of arts and literature, from the 11th to the 17th century. The purpose is to have a brand new and interdisciplinary view on the notion of “place” which finally concern several research subjects. Communications should try to introduce historiographical elements enabling to develop comparisons between the different interventions and to think about the notion of “place” nd its evolution through time.

The proposals are expected for the 15th of January 2018 at the latest. They should be fifteen-line summary of the proposed lecture addressed to the Organising Committee, send together with a CV, the title of the thesis et the name of the research director(s). Candidate will be informed of the approval or the rejection of their proposal by the 15 th of February 2018.
Lectures should last 20 minutes maximum, with the possibility to project a Powerpoint. They can be made in French or in English.
We will unfortunately not be able to provide you financial help for the accommodation or the transport.
If you need an attestation to valorise your participation, we will be able to provide it.
Please do not hesitate to contact us if you need further information.
Organising Committee:
– Julie Colaye, PhD student in medieval history : juliecolaye@gmail.com
– Marie Quillent, PhD student in history of medieval art : marie.quillent@wanadoo.fr

10 Doctoral Fellowships in the a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities-Programme

10 Doctoral Fellowships in the a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities-Programme
Deadline: November 3, 2017
csm_eumanities_rgb_2680d6c349a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities is a pioneering programme for a European Graduate School for the Humanities, co-funded by the European Union and the University of Cologne as part of the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (Horizon 2020: MSCA). Central to this programme are its interdisciplinary approach and obligatory mobility phase.

Designed to meet the needs of individual Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) in the Humanities, beginning in April 2018 a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities provides places for up to 10 ESRs, training young scholars to excel in research and cope with the global challenges Europe is facing. Our mission is to empower ESRs in the Humanities to become aware of their pivotal role in shaping the future of Europe.

ESR positions have a duration of 36 months per person. The ESRs will be employed full-time by the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School (living allowance EUR 3,073 less tax deductions and employer’s contribution to social insurance plus a monthly paid mobility allowance and additional travel and, if applicable, family allowances). The employment conditions include social benefit payments such as health insurance, unemployment insurance, pension contributions and parental benefits. Please note that, in general, the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School is not able to cover tuition fees for the institution chosen for the obligatory mobility phase.

The ESRs of a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities are enrolled in the structured doctoral model of the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School, the “Integrated Track”, according to two international mobility options. ESRs may apply for:

• “a.r.t.e.s. EU”: the European fellowship at a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities

• “a.r.t.e.s. global”: the global fellowship at a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities

a.r.t.e.s. EUmanities is funded by the Universität zu Köln and the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 713600.

For more information on the application procedures and requirements, please visit www.artes.uni-koeln.de pr contact us via e-mail: artes-EUmanities@uni-koeln.de.