Tag Archives: Iberian Peninsula

CFP: Travelling Objects, Travelling People: Art and Artists of Late Medieval and Renaissance Iberia and Beyond, c. 1400–1550, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28–29 May 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline – Friday 10 January 2020

Anonymous Portuguese cartographer, Cantino Planisphere (detail), ca. 1502. Map on parchment, 220 x 105 cm. Biblioteca Estense Universitaria, Modena, Italy. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Travelling Objects, Travelling People aims to nuance our understanding of the exchanges and influences that shaped the artistic landscape of Medieval and Renaissance Iberia. Traditional narratives hold that late fifteenth-century Iberian art and architecture were transformed by the arrival of artists, objects and ideas from France and the Low Countries, while 1492 marked a chronological rupture and the beginning of global encounters. Challenging these perceptions, this conference will reconsider the dynamics of artistic influence in late medieval Iberia, and place European exchanges in a global context, from Madeira to Santo Domingo. Bringing together international scholars working on Spain, Portugal and a range of related geographies, it seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and issues of migration and non-linear transfers of materials, techniques and iconographies.

The theme of ‘travellers’—artists who reached or departed the region, at times more than once in their lives, but also objects and concepts imported and exported—will expand and inflect traditional narratives of late medieval and Renaissance art, underscoring the complexity of global interactions and exchanges which connected the Iberian peninsula to Europe and beyond. Bringing together international scholars working on Iberia and a range of related geographies, the conference seeks to address the impact of ‘itinerant’ artworks, artists and ideas, and to expand the field of analysis beyond Europe to encompass relationships with newly acquired dominions, from Madeira to Santo Domingo.

Topics for papers may include, but are not limited to:

  • Iberian artists employed abroad, from the master mason Guillelm Sagrera in Naples, to the sculptor Juan de la Huerta at the Chartreuse de Champmol
  • The close imitation of northern artists in such works as the Portuguese copies of Quentin Metsys’s The Angel Appearing to Saints Clara, Colette and Agnes (early 16th century, Museu de Setúbal / Convento de Jesus, Portugal)
  • ‘Iberian’ objects produced elsewhere, for example Christian ivory carvings made in Goa or Kongo, Afro-Portuguese spoons, and Mexican ‘feather-work’ adopting the vocabulary of northern European late Gothic painting
  • Works made for a non-Iberian audience but purchased and displayed by local patrons.

By encouraging conversations across such seemingly disparate topics and geographies, the conference aims to position the Iberian artistic landscape within the networks of artistic exchange that spanned the medieval and Renaissance worlds, challenging the significance of 1492 as a moment of rupture between the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods.

Proposals are welcome from postgraduate, early-career and established researchers working in all relevant disciplines. Please send a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words together with a short CV and 100-word biography to Costanza.Beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and Sylvia.Alvares-Correa@history.ox.ac.uk by Friday 10 January 2020.

Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length. Successful candidates will be notified by 17 February. In the first instance, applicants are encouraged to apply to their home institution for travel and accommodation funding. The organisers hope to provide financial support for travel and accommodation to speakers who require it. This conference is made possible by the kind generosity of Sam Fogg.

Please click here for more information.

Workshop: Art and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650) (23 April 18)

2nd International Workshop:
Art and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650)

Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, April 23, 2018

Visual strategies of legitimization became increasingly important for Iberian monarchies during the late medieval and early modern periods. Their dynastic, diplomatic, and military endeavors called for effective propaganda, both in the metropolis and in viceregal territories. Such efforts include architecture, both ephemeral and permanent, the decoration of palaces, court portraiture, and historiography. The advent of the Monarchia Hispanica under Habsburg rule required careful elaborations of national, religious, racial, and gender identities, across a mosaic of multilingual and multiethnic populations. This second workshop aims to highlight some of these strategies, and to consolidate a forum for discussion of further research avenues, under the guidance of scholars from Spanish and American universities. It is made possible thanks to the collaboration of Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University, and University of Valencia.

16.00 Welcome, opening remarks and panel.
Panelists:
– Replicating the Royal Image: Philip III’s portrait at Harvard Art Museums.
Cristina Morilla, Associate Paintings Conservator, Harvard Art Museums.

– Alliance, Emulation and Competition in the Habsburg Netherlands: The Case of a 16th-Century Alabaster Funerary Monument in Heverlee.
Jessie Park, Rousseau Curatorial Fellow in European Art, Harvard Art Museums.

– Sofonisba Anguissola’s Self-Portraiture, from Court Propaganda to Meta-Artistic Sign. Jorge Sebastián Lozano, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Valencia; Research Fellow, Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University.

17.30 Q & A
Discussion moderated by Prof. Felipe Pereda, Fernando Zóbel de Ayala Professor of Spanish Art, Harvard University.

Location:
RCC Conference Room
26 Trowbridge St.
Cambridge, MA

Free registration. Please RSVP at
https://rcc.harvard.edu/event/2nd-international-workshop-art-and-court-cultures-iberian-world-1400-1650

Call for Participants: MAIUS Workshop, 13/03/2018, Deadline TODAY

Maius Workshop

MAIUS Workshop Meeting
March 13, 6 – 7:30
Senate House, Rm G21A

Please join us for our next meeting of graduate students and early career researchers working on Iberian and Latin American studies! The next Maius Workshop will take place at Senate House (Room G21A, Senate House, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU, UK) and will broadly consider issues related to ‘Inside and Outside Geographical Boundaries’.

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CFP: International conference: ‘Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries,’ University of Warsaw and the National Museum in Warsaw, June 28 – 29, 2018

banderolesCall for Papers: International conference: Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries, University of Warsaw and the National Museum in Warsaw, June 28 – 29, 2018
Deadline:  15 January 2018

Keynote speakers:
Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)
Suzanne Karr Schmidt (The Newberry, Chicago)

The production of printed image consists of a multiplication of a particular design, whereas the consumption and reception of single impressions often involve various modifications. Multiple, but virtually identical woodcuts or engravings reproduce and thus disseminate the original composition, while at the same time they have lives of their own. They have been placed in various contexts, coloured, trimmed, framed, pasted into books and onto other objects. The place of prints in both visual and material culture of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries is a continuously growing field in recent scholarship. However, these studies usually focus on the most prominent centres of production situated in Italy, the Low Countries, France and the Empire. The principal aim of the conference Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries is to contribute to the research on the beginning and early development of the graphic arts from the perspective of the beholder, while broadening geographically the field of inquiry, i.e. by shifting the emphasis to the regions of Central Europe, the British Isles, the Iberian Peninsula, Dalmatia, as well as considering the reception of the European prints on other continents.
Possible topics include but are not limited to:
– Practices of consumption of printed images (owners and beholders, reasons for their interest in printed images; collecting and connoisseurship; printed images in public spaces and in households)
– Printed images in the early modern iconography and contemporary written sources
– Print market, copyright and censorship; printed images in confessional disputes
– Reproductive function of printed images and modifications, adaptations and transformations of original designs, matrices and single impressions
– Printmaking and bookmaking  (role of illustrations in printed books as compared with handwritten illuminated codices; illustrated books and broadsheets, written commentaries to woodcuts and engravings)
We invite proposals from scholars of all disciplines working on the history of print culture.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length and will be followed by a ten-minute Q&A session.
Please e-mail an abstract of no more than 300 words to Magdalena Herman (multipliedandmodified@uw.edu.pl) by January 15, 2018.

Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and a brief biography of no more than 200 words. Successful applicants will be notified by February 19, 2018. Please indicate whether you would be interested in further developing your paper for a publication.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Multiplied and Modified (Warsaw, 28-29 Jun 18). In: ArtHist.net, Oct 31, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16627>.