Tag Archives: Images

CFP: Medieval and Early Modern Spaces and Places: Experiencing the Court,Trinity Laban Conservatoire, London, April 3 – 04, 2019

mem20poster_experiencing20the20courtDeadline: Nov 15, 2018

Medieval and Early Modern Spaces and Places: Experiencing the Court, 2019

The early modern court adopted and developed exemplary cultural practices where objects and spaces became central to propagating power as well as places for exchange with other powers. This combination of images, objects, and sounds confronted the senses, making a powerful and distinctive impression of the resident family and the region they represented: flickering candlelight on glass and gold vessels adorned credenze (sideboards); musical instruments announced royal entries or provided entertainment; brightly coloured tapestries covered the palace walls along with paintings of biblical or mythological stories; cabinets displayed antiquities or rarities; perfume burners permeated the air; while the smells and tastes of rare delicacies at the centre of dining tables made for a multi-sensory spectacle.

This year the Open University’s Spaces & Places conference will address the theme of ‘Experiencing the Court’ by exploring the senses and the lived experiences of courtly life, whether based in a particular residence or defined by the travels of an itinerant ruler. This annual conference is fundamentally interdisciplinary: literary, musical, architectural, artistic and religious spaces will be the subjects of enquiry, not as discrete or separate entities, but ones which overlapped, came into contact with one another, and at times were in conflict.

The conference will examine life at court and will consider the following questions:

–    How can approaching the court in terms of the senses provide new methodologies for understanding each institution?
–    How were medieval and early modern courtly spaces adapted and transformed through the movement of material and immaterial things?
–    Which particular aspects of political, social and economic infrastructures enabled the exchange of objects and ideas?

Papers that address new methodologies, the digital humanities, object-centred enquiries, cross-cultural comparisons, or new theoretical perspectives are particularly welcome.

Please send a 150 word abstract along with a short biography to Leah Clark (leah.clark@open.ac.uk) and Helen Coffey (Helen.coffey@open.ac.uk) by 15 November 2018.

The conference will take place at the Open University’s partner institution Trinity Laban Conservatoire on 3 and 4 April 2019.  As Trinity Laban’s King Charles Court was once the site of Greenwich Palace, it is a fitting venue for a conference exploring court life.

For updated information visit our website: http://www.open.ac.uk/arts/research/medieval-and-early-modern-research/spaces-places

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CFP: Imago & Mirabilia (Barcelona, 18-20 Oct 2018)

Extended deadline!

The Ways of Wonder in the Medieval Mediterranean

18-20 October 2018 | Museu Nacional d’Art de Cataluyna

The ways of wonder in the middle Ages were shaped by a variety of places, stories and beliefs with ancient sources reworked by the Christian tradition. Activated by the opening of the Mediterranean, religious, commercial and military travels spread Christian worship, accounts and prized objects throughout Christianity. The real and the imaginary adventures confronted their protagonists with fabulous characters and places. The cult of Eastern saints found anchor points in the Western world where they sometimes developed as strongly or even more, proving, therefore, their polycentric nature.

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Coll & Cortes Medieval Spain Seminar Series: Images, devotion and emotion in 13th- and 14th-century Castile (18 April 2018)

toro-santa-clara-600x600What was the role of images in the religious experience of Castilian people of the 13th and 14th centuries? There is no clear answer, and the scarcity of written evidence has prompted much problematic speculation. However, on the basis of the images themselves and of relevant literary sources, including the well-known Cantigas de Santa María and works by 14th-century authors such as Juan Ruiz and Juan Manuel, it is possible to explore a number of key issues. The talk will be divided into three sections. One focuses on the 13th century: ‘Active images: the Cantigas de Santa María and their aftermath’. Another looks to the 14th century: ‘Passive images: the reception and dissemination of the Crucifixus dolorosus in Castile’. And it concludes by looking ‘beyond’ Art History. In the 1960s a Spanish politician coined the (in)famous tourist slog, ‘Spain is different’. His aim was to encourage foreigners to visit Spain, but the slogan is representative of a commonplace that has been repeated time and again since the Romantic era. Ultimately, my talk offers an invitation to reconsider whether Castilian and Spanish devotional practices are really so very different from those recorded elsewhere in medieval western Europe. Continue reading

CFP: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS): Truth and Fiction, 28-30 June 2018

25e58865266eadd5bdb9a530a627b0db-medieval-art-middle-agesCall for Papers: 15th Annual Conference of the International Medieval Society-Paris (IMS), Truth and Fiction
Deadline: 24 November 2017.

In the wake of the US presidential election and the Brexit referendum, the Oxford English Dictionary chose the expression “post-truth” as its word of the year. This expression underlines the growing tendency to dismiss objective facts in favor of impulsive—and often prejudicial—feelings, frequently supported by “alternative facts.” The contentious relationship between the truth and lies, or truth and fiction, which is currently playing out in the public arena has, in fact, a long-standing legacy—one which can be traced back to the Middle Ages. For this reason, this year’s IMS conference seeks to investigate the variety of different approaches to truth and fiction that existed in the Middle Ages.

One possible avenue of inquiry concerns new ideas of Truth introduced by the Gregorian reforms. On a philosophical and doctrinal level, the idea of the infallibility of the Pope, the “Doctor of Truth,” was introduced by Gregory VII who, taking up the words of Christ, contended that he was the Truth (via, veritas, et vita). From a liturgical and sacramental point of view, on the other hand, we can study contemporary tenets of Eucharistic doctrine as a challenge to common sense as a mystery of human understanding—albeit articulated in rationalist terms. Papers thus might address the manner by which the Gregorian reforms placed the question of truth at the center of the demands of society: by constructing this “ideology of truth,” but also—and above all—by implementing mechanisms like preaching, which spread Truth to Christians, and confession, which introduced the obligation to speak the truth. We are particularly interested in the place and the role of Fictions in these devices (sermons, exempla, vita, etc.).

A second approach to this theme is through language, discourse and narrative forms that aimed to produce a supposed truth. We could examine the relationships between literature and history and their ambiguity with respect to the truth. For example, fictionalized historical narratives throughout the medieval period were frequently thought to be true because they provided a means of decrypting the social order. As John of Salisbury wrote, “even the lies of poets served the Truth.” Papers might explore relationships between truth and fiction through the lens of historical and literary genres (novels, epics, etc.) and the ‘truths’ they produced, placing special emphasis on the way that it was possible to believe the facts related in these works. The importance of these historico-literary fictions—what Paul Veyne called “doctrine in the face of facts”—might also be taken into account.

Law and rhetoric also construct notions of truth. Rhetoric permits the control of the relationship between the author and the audiences of a text and the establishment of the status of a text as veridic, among other things. It can even create direct links between music and words, using metaphor as a means of approaching the truth. Papers could consider, for instance, the virtuosity of the effects of Truth produced by the dictamen or even the quaestio scholastique as a method for establishing Truth with certitude, as well as the place of fiction within these new political languages.

Images throughout the medieval period play a fundamental role in the construction or undermining of truth(s). According to Augustine, the image is not truth, but rather a means of understanding Truth. For him, the work of art renders abstractions concrete using representations hat are both specific and individualized. What is the art object’s role in dispelling truth or decrying falsehoods? Through what formal and material means does it achieve either? Papers might consider the use and forms of medieval diagrams, the role of the art object in spiritual form, etc.

Finally, the conference aims to examine the origins and development of interrogative procedures in the medieval period, in that they illustrate relationships with the truth maintained by medieval societies. We are especially interested in the uses and status of fictive facts in inquisitorial trials, the manner that fictions were revealed during trials, or even how the participation of individuals in inquisitorial trials was viewed as an instrument of legitimization of power and as a way of acknowledging those individuals’ own truths and interpretations of facts.

This great diversity of themes opens participation to researchers working in a variety of different fields and coming from a variety of backgrounds: historians, art historians, musicologists, philosophers, literary scholars, specialists in auxiliary sciences (paleographers, epigraphists, codicologists, numismatists)… While we focus on medieval France, compelling submissions focused on other geographical areas that also fit the conference theme are welcomed. In bringing together such diverse proposals, the IMS conference seeks to take a new look at the notion of Truth, its articulations, and its relationship with Fiction in the medieval world.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words (in French or English) for a 20-minute paper should be sent to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com. Each proposal should be accompanied by full contact information, a CV, and a list of the audio-visual equipment required for the presentation.

The deadline for abstracts is 24 November 2017.

Paper selections will be made by a scientific committee composed of Catherine Croizy-Naquet (Univ. Paris 3/CERAM), Marie Dejoux (Univ. Paris 1/LAMOP), Lindsey Hansen (IMS), Fanny Madeline (LAMOP/IMS), and Valerie Wilhite (Univ. of the Virgin Islands/IMS), as well as the members of the Board of Directors of the IMS.

Please be aware that the IMS-Paris submissions review process is highly competitive and is carried out on a strictly anonymous basis.

The selection committee will email applicants in mid-December to notify them of its decisions. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS-Paris website thereafter.

Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fees (35€ per person, 20€ for students, free for members of LAMOP and CERAM; 10€ membership dues for all participants).

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organization that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For more than a decade, the IMS has served as a center for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work or study. For more information about the IMS-Paris and for past symposium programs, please visit our websites: www.ims-paris.org and https://imsparis.hypotheses.org.

IMS-Paris Graduate Student Prize:

The IMS-Paris is pleased to offer one prize for the best paper proposal by a graduate student. Applications should consist of:

1) a symposium paper abstract

2) an outline of a current research project (PhD dissertation research)

3) the names and contact information of two academic referees

The prize-winner will be selected by the board and a committee of honorary members, and will be notified upon acceptance to the Symposium. An award of 350€ to support international travel/accommodation (within France, 150€) will be paid at the symposium.

New Website: Walters Ex Libris (Walters Art Museum Manuscripts)

walters-to-deleteNew Website: Walters Ex Libris (Walters Art Museum Manuscripts) online at manuscripts.thewalters.org.

Featuring a user-friendly design, the site provides visitors with intuitive search options, including the ability to refine their search by date, geography, subject, culture, and more. It also gives users a chance to coordinate their own online collections by gathering, saving and sharing their favorite masterpieces.
Images include covers and flyleaves, and provided under a Creative Commons 3.0 license that allows visitors to download publication-quality pictures for free.

To date, the Walters has digitized 45 percent of its manuscripts collection.

The manuscripts site, an ongoing project, joins the museum’s growing network of online resources, including its general website, thewalters.org, and its online collection, art.thewalters.org.

 

 

Conference: Miracoli ‘di carta’ e miracoli dipinti: testi e immagini del prodigioso in Italia tra XIV e XVIII secolo (9 April 2015)

Istituto Sangalli, Piazza San Firenze, 3
April 9, 2015

Miracoli ‘di carta’ e miracoli dipinti: testi e immagini del prodigioso in Italia tra XIV e XVIII secolo

Seminario interdisciplinare di studi

Presiede SOFIA BOESCH GAJANO
(Università di Roma Tre)

10:30
MAURIZIO SANGALLI (Istituto Sangalli)
Vent’anni dopo. A mo’ d’introduzione

11:00
MARCO FAINI (University of Cambridge)
Miracoli quotidiani: libri di orazioni, fogli volanti e stampe

11:30
ALESSIA LIROSI (Università “La Sapienza”)
Icone sacre e Chiesa militante: miracoli nella Roma
della Controriforma

12.00
LUCIO BIASIORI (Villa I Tatti, Harvard University Center for Italian
Renaissance Studies)
“Ha fatto molti diversi et evidenti miracoli”: la lunga vita del
bambino di Babilonia (1319-1793)

12:30 Discussione

13:30 Pranzo
Presiede GIULIO SODANO
(Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli)

15.00
IRENE GALANDRA COOPER (University of Cambridge)
Oggetti di pietà domestica nella Napoli del Cinquecento

15:30
ALESSIA MENEGHIN (University of Cambridge)
I miracoli cinquecenteschi della Beata Vergine Maria della Chiesa del
Soccorso di Rovigo

16.00
LAURA FENELLI (Istituto Sangalli)
Ricostruire la topografia devozionale di un’immagine miracolosa
nell’Europa post-tridentina: il caso di san Domenico di Soriano

16:30 Discussione

17:30 Conclusione dei lavori