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CFP: International conference: ‘Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries,’ University of Warsaw and the National Museum in Warsaw, June 28 – 29, 2018

banderolesCall for Papers: International conference: Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries, University of Warsaw and the National Museum in Warsaw, June 28 – 29, 2018
Deadline:  15 January 2018

Keynote speakers:
Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)
Suzanne Karr Schmidt (The Newberry, Chicago)

The production of printed image consists of a multiplication of a particular design, whereas the consumption and reception of single impressions often involve various modifications. Multiple, but virtually identical woodcuts or engravings reproduce and thus disseminate the original composition, while at the same time they have lives of their own. They have been placed in various contexts, coloured, trimmed, framed, pasted into books and onto other objects. The place of prints in both visual and material culture of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries is a continuously growing field in recent scholarship. However, these studies usually focus on the most prominent centres of production situated in Italy, the Low Countries, France and the Empire. The principal aim of the conference Multiplied and Modified. Reception of the Printed Image in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries is to contribute to the research on the beginning and early development of the graphic arts from the perspective of the beholder, while broadening geographically the field of inquiry, i.e. by shifting the emphasis to the regions of Central Europe, the British Isles, the Iberian Peninsula, Dalmatia, as well as considering the reception of the European prints on other continents.
Possible topics include but are not limited to:
– Practices of consumption of printed images (owners and beholders, reasons for their interest in printed images; collecting and connoisseurship; printed images in public spaces and in households)
– Printed images in the early modern iconography and contemporary written sources
– Print market, copyright and censorship; printed images in confessional disputes
– Reproductive function of printed images and modifications, adaptations and transformations of original designs, matrices and single impressions
– Printmaking and bookmaking  (role of illustrations in printed books as compared with handwritten illuminated codices; illustrated books and broadsheets, written commentaries to woodcuts and engravings)
We invite proposals from scholars of all disciplines working on the history of print culture.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length and will be followed by a ten-minute Q&A session.
Please e-mail an abstract of no more than 300 words to Magdalena Herman (multipliedandmodified@uw.edu.pl) by January 15, 2018.

Along with your abstract please include your name, institution, paper title and a brief biography of no more than 200 words. Successful applicants will be notified by February 19, 2018. Please indicate whether you would be interested in further developing your paper for a publication.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CFP: Multiplied and Modified (Warsaw, 28-29 Jun 18). In: ArtHist.net, Oct 31, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16627>.

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Job: Gallery Assistant, Global Art Gallery

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Job: Gallery Assistant, Global Art Gallery
Deadline: April 4
Global Art Gallery on the Upper East Side with multiple locations in the USA, France, and Britain seeks a full-time (could be ¾ time to start) gallery assistant.
Responsibilities include:  administration, including coordination of shipping, sales to new and established clients, organization of in-house exhibitions, participation in international art fairs, answering the phone, and greeting clients.
The ideal candidate will have some background in Medieval and Renaissance art history, preferably at the post-graduate level, excellent computer and verbal skills, and some experience in the art world, including in sales.  Applicant must be a self-starter, multi-tasker, well-organized, and able to work independently.  There is considerable interaction with a worldwide team of more than a dozen individuals, as well as enormous potential for growth within the company. This is not a research position.
Salary commensurate with experience.
How to Apply: Send letter of application and CV to (preferably by April 4):  office@lesenluminures.com

CFP: The Economy of Dress and Textiles: Avenues of Trade, Production and Consumption in the Early Modern Period

medieval-textile-images0002Call for Papers: The Economy of Dress and Textiles:  Avenues of Trade, Production and
Consumption in the Early Modern Period
University of Bologna, Dipartimento di Storia Culture e Civiltà, San
Giovanni in Monte, Bologna, Italy, September 15, 2016
Deadline: Apr 30, 2016

The cloth and textile market is of central importance to the late
medieval and early modern economy. Trade routes, centres of production
and patterns of consumption were determining factors that stimulated
the influx of luxury cloth and textiles into established fashion and
textile markets, while second-hand garments developed their own
trajectory. Being sold at auctions and dealer shops, they sometimes
enjoyed a second life and were often refashioned. The entire cost
related to the fashioning of a garment, which comprised the purchase of
raw materials and tailoring expenses, is a reflection of the journey
and provenance of the relevant textiles, furs and haberdashery prior to
their shaping and consumption. In turn, the respective markets for both
low-end and high-end goods also played an important role in social and
cultural life, as the cost, display and representations of dress
emphasised the wealth and social and political status of the wearer.
The conference aims to generate a discussion about the economy of dress
and textiles in relation to the connection between trade, production,
consumption and the cost and status of low-end and high-end goods in
the late medieval and early modern periods.

PhD students and early career researchers are invited to speak about
the economy of dress and textiles from a variety of perspectives in
order to build a more complete picture of their journey both literal
and figurative from raw materials to fully fledged garments that
sometimes get refashioned.

Submission: potential speakers are invited to submit as a
single document: (1) a 300-word paper abstract, which should include
the main question of the research project, (2) a paper title, (3) a
brief curriculum vitae, (4) institutional affiliations and (5) contact
information to the Dressing the Early Modern Network at
info@dressingtheearlymodern.com

Each speaker will be allotted twenty minutes. The deadline for
submissions is 30 April 2016. Notification of the outcome will be
advised by e-mail on or before 15 May 2016.

Please note that funding is not provided for this event, so
participants will be required to fund and arrange their own travel and
accommodations.