Tag Archives: Renaissance

CFP: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, 16 February 2018

HolyofHoliesReliquary

Call for papers: The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium: Collecting (in) the Middle Ages, The Courtauld Institute of Art, 16 February 2017
Deadline: 30 October 2017

The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 23rd Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium invites speakers to consider the nature of medieval collections, the context of their creation and fruition, and their legacy — or disappearance — in the present.

Inspired by objects such as a cedar box chest once kept in the Holy of Holies of the Lateran, this colloquium seeks to explore a diverse set of topics surrounding medieval practices of collecting. This wooden box may seem simple, but once opened it reveals a priceless collection: fragments of rock and wood from the Holy Land, each labelled with its precise place of origin by a sixth-century hand. Here and there, stones have fallen out, leaving imprints in the soil. The wooden relic chest is an object of small size and almost no material value, but has nevertheless been treasured for centuries by one of the largest and most powerful institutions of the medieval world.

The study of medieval collecting raises a variety of questions. How and why were objects collected, practically and conceptually? What was their expected time-span and what enabled their survival? How have medieval collections impacted modern scholarship, and how do modern collecting and display practices influence our interpretation of the past?

Applicants to the colloquium are encouraged to explore these issues from a diverse range of methodologies, analysing objects from the 6th to the 16th century and from a wide-ranging geographical span. Possible areas of discussion might include:

  • Collecting through time: How do we define the medieval collection/collector? How did medieval objects take on new meanings in medieval collections, ie. in the case of spolia? How has scholarship on medieval art been influenced by varying collecting practices and curatorial strategies across time?
  • Collecting in space: can the idea of the ‘collection’ be expanded to include objects, places and spaces spread across different geographical locales? Could objects or spaces communicate their commonality across a distance? How did pilgrimage routes, travel narratives and travel guides conceptualize their surroundings and weave a thread through geographical and historical difference?
  • Collectors, intermediaries, and craftsmen: how did institutions and single collectors acquire and expand their collections? For example, did they rely on a merchant network to acquire foreign objects or new relics? Did they collect newly commissioned objects, and display them in purpose-built spaces?
  • Collections and Legacies: how did inheritance impact the notion of collecting, looking forwards as well backwards? How did the meaning of objects change as they were passed down through families and dynasties? What happened to collections when familial lines ended? How did individuals link themselves to courts or dynasties through collections?
  • Accessibility: When, how and why were collections visible? Were there different levels of accessibility and interaction and who was allowed to ‘access all areas’? How were restricted collections advertised and open collections protected? And did objects themselves interact with each other, for example in specific displays or assemblages?
  • Organising Collections: What were the systems for assembling a collection, and for how they were curated? How did purpose-built spaces impact the growth of collections, and vice-versa? What were the roles of documents in collections, and how have medieval recording practices influenced modern views of the medieval collection?

The Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium offers an opportunity for research students at all levels from universities across the UK and abroad to present, discuss and promote their research. To apply, please send a proposal of up to 250 words for a 20 minute paper, together with a CV, to costanza.beltrami@courtauld.ac.uk and maggie.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk no later than 30 October 2017.

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Conference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford, Saturday 18th November 2017

astonomytodeleteConference: “Astronomy Across the Medieval World,” St Cross College, University of Oxford – Martin Wood Lecture Theatre, Department of Physics, Saturday 18th November 2017

10.30 am – 5.00 pm

The celestial sky has been a source of fascination since ancient times with astronomy being the oldest of the natural sciences. During the medieval period, astronomy flourished in many cultures across the world, some of which followed on from earlier models created by Ptolemy. The motions of the celestial bodies were investigated, early astronomical observatories were built and some cultures constructed remarkable monuments inspired by astronomical insights. This conference will draw together the different strands of medieval astronomy from across the world and will examine how they interfaced and paved the way for the scientific developments later in the Renaissance.

Registration to attend this conference is free, but must be confirmed using the Conference booking form by midday on Friday 10th November 2017.

Confirmed speakers include:

Dr Giles Gasper (Durham University) – `The Service of Astronomy’ – European Star-Gazing and Its Implications in the Middle Ages

Professor Christopher Cullen (University of Cambridge) – Chinese Astronomy in a World Context

Dr Josep Casulleras (University of Barcelona) – From Ancient to Modern: Astronomy in Medieval Islam

Professor Ivan Šprajc (Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts) – Mayan and Aztec Astronomy: Skywatching in Prehispanic Mesoamerica

Dr Benno van Dalen (Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities) – Ptolemaic Astronomy and Its Dissemination in the Islamic World, Europe and Asia

There will be a conference dinner at St Cross in the evening following the end of the conference with an after-dinner talk by Dr Valerie Shrimplin (Gresham College) on the influence of astronomy and the cosmos on medieval art. Although the conference itself is free of charge, the dinner carries a cost of £35 to attend – booking a place for dinner can be done here.

For more information see the website: https://www.stx.ox.ac.uk/happ/events/astronomy-across-medieval-world-one-day-conference

 

Conference: Art and Economy in France and Italy in the 14th century: new research

giottotodeleteConference: Art et économie en France et en Italie au XIVe siècle. Nouvelles enquêtes,Art et économie en France et en Italie au XIVe siècle. Nouvelles enquêtes, Université de Lausanne, 19-20 October 2017

 

 

Programme:

Jeudi 19 octobre 2017

Nicolas Bock, Michele Tomasi
Introduction

14h30 L’Italie au Trecento et au Quattrocento : da Giotto alla morte !

Damien Cerutti
Giotto & Cie. Réflexions sur le marché pictural florentin dans le deuxième quart du Trecento

Katalin Prajda
Finanze e attività imprenditoriale nelle industrie pittoriche, orafe e di carpenteria nella Firenze del primo Rinascimento. Come la seta divenne una specialità fiorentina

Fabio Marcelli
Arte, civiltà comunale ed economia nell’Appennino umbro-marchigiano

Giampaolo Ermini
Il cantiere del coro trecentesco del duomo di Orvieto: manovalanza, materiali, costi e finanziamenti

Paola Vitolo
Spese della morte: investimenti per l’aldilà (e per l’al di qua) e pratica artistica (Italia, XIII-XIV secolo)

 

Vendredi 20 octobre 2017

9h00 Les arts de luxe

Chiara Maggioni
Orfèvreries à Mantoue au XIVe siècle : frais, évaluations, valeurs de marché

Andrea Cravero
Vetri dorati e graffiti del basso medioevo: economia di una bottega assisiate e mercato fiorentino

Giampaolo Distefano
Le occasioni del mercato artistico parigino del Trecento e la carriera dell’orafo Jean le Braelier

11h30  Entre l’Italie et la France

Teodoro De Giorgio
La riorganizzazione del sistema fiscale della corte pontificia avignonese sotto Giovanni XXII (1316-1334) e il nuovo volto del mecenatismo artistico papale

Alain Salamagne
L’usage du bois précieux dans le château en France et en Bourgogne (1350-1450)

14h00 Perspectives méditerranéennes

Doron Bauer
Economic Fluctuations and Artistic Production in The Kingdom of Majorca

Francesco Ruvolo
Prima di Antonello. Nuovi culti, spazio sacro e potere economico, nella Messina tra Due e Trecento

15h00  En ouvrant encore les horizons

Étienne Anheim
L’économie du travail artistique au XIVe siècle en France et en Italie

Wim Blockmans
La spécificité du secteur de l’art dans l’économie du bas Moyen Âge
Conclusions

 

Last conference places: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650

quadfromgateConference: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650, residential conference at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 6-9 September 2017
Register by 3 September

Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded on humanistic principles in 1517.  Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the long sixteenth century, Corpus was a major centre of learning and religion: it played host to the Spanish humanist, Juan Luis Vives and the German astronomer and mathematician, Nicholas Kratzer; its fellows included the Catholic reformer Reginald Pole and the Protestant thinkers John Jewel and Richard Hooker; it played a prominent part in the production of the King James Bible.  In the College’s 500th anniversary year, we are holding a conference to discuss the wider context and implications of this remarkable foundation, exploring the inter-connected worlds of learning and education, prelacy and public service, charity and communal life, religion, literature and the arts, in Oxford and beyond, during a two hundred-year period of Renaissance and Reformation.

The programme includes papers from Susan Brigden, Clive Burgess, Jeremy Catto, Paul Cavill, Alexandra Gajda, Anthony Grafton, Lucy Kaufman, Nicholas Hardy, Pamela King, Julian Reid, Richard Rex, Miri Rubin, David Rundle, Christopher Stray, Joanna Weinberg, Magnus Williamson, and William Whyte.  A round table of Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Heal and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by Keith Thomas, will bring proceedings to a close.

Details are available here: Conference Programme.

Booking is now open: please click here Renaissance College Conference.

If you have any questions about your booking, please feel free to contact kerry.atkinson@ccc.ox.ac.uk.  For any queries about the content of the conference, please contact john.watts@ccc.ox.ac.uk.

 

Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400- 1600 (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium), The Courtauld Institute of Art, 28 April 2017

ghirlandaio20-20calling20of20the20apostles20detail-201481-20fresco-20sistine20chapel20vatican-31-600x600Conference: The Art of the Network: Visualising Social Relationships, ca. 1400 – 1600, (The Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Student Symposium) Courtauld Institute of Art, London, April 28, 2017

In recent years, the analysis of social networks has generated a
fruitful field of scholarly enquiry. Research addressing the dynamics
that govern personal relationships within and without communities of
various kinds has permeated through historical, anthropological, and
sociological studies. These investigations have traced the ways in
which societies structured according to gender, family bonds, and
neighbourhood ties as well as political, professional, and religious
associations regulated social interaction. However, the role of art and
architecture in cultivating these interpersonal relationships has not
been explored comprehensively. Even art historical approaches have
frequently given preference to textual rather than visual evidence in
elucidating these social networks.

This conference seeks to shed light on the ways in which social
networks have been represented visually. Such an approach has great
potential to deepen the discussion surrounding the commission,
production, and reception of art and architecture between 1400 and 1600.

This conference is generously sponsored by the Sackler Research Forum,
Courtauld Institute of Art, the CHASE AHRC Doctoral Training
Partnership Cohort Development Fund, and the Society for Renaissance
Studies.

‘The Art of the Network’ is free and open to the public. Advanced
registration is strongly encouraged:
http://courtauld.ac.uk/event/the-art-of-the-network

PROGRAMME

9.00 – 9.30
Registration

9.30 – 9.45
Welcome: Alexander J. Noelle (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

9.45 – 11.10
Session 1: Materialising Allegiance
Chaired by Suzanne Duff (Brown University)

Ann Adams (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
Perpetual Membership: The Fifteenth-Century Tombs of the Knights of the
Order of the Golden Fleece

Sara Frier (Yale University)
So sah ich als Soldat aus (‘This is how I looked as a soldier’): The
Mercenary-Artists of Renaissance Switzerland

Anna Merlini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A Journey through the Labyrinth of Symbols: Retracing a Social Network
across Achille Bocchi’s Symbolicae Quaestiones (1555)

Discussion

11.10 – 11.35
Tea / Coffee Break

11.35 – 13.00
Session 2: Civic Art
Chaired by Imogen Tedbury (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Maria Harvey (The University of Cambridge)
‘ + E?????? ????? ? ???????? ?[??] … ?[????] K??[??????]’: Art and
Community in Fifteenth-Century Salento

Saida Bondini (The Courtauld Institute of Art)
A History of Families: Networks of Private Patronage in Late
Fifteenth-Century Bologna

Maria Matarazzo (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
The Plinian Monuments in Como: Classical Antiquity as Municipal Identity

Discussion

13.00 – 14.00
Lunch Break

14.00 – 15.25
Session 3: Artist(ic) Identity
Chaired by Lydia Goodson (The Warburg Institute)

Elizabeth Bernick (John Hopkins University)
Mapping Cesare da Sesto: A Placeless Style

Wouter Wagemakers (University of Amsterdam)
Visualising Patterns of Patronage in Sixteenth-Century Verona: Michele
Sanmicheli and the Roman Connection

Luca Baroni (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa)
Urbino to Europe: Federico Barocci’s Artistic and Diplomatic Network as
Visualised in His Paintings

Discussion

15.25 – 15.50
Tea / Coffee Break

15.50 – 17.15
Session 4: Visualising Dynasties
Chaired by Bart van Eekelen (Utrecht University)

Anastazja Grudnicka (University College London)
The (Un)Making of the Habsburg Dynasty: Visual Representations of
Matthias Habsburg in the Dutch Provinces (1577-1581)

Rebekah Helen Lee (University of York)
By the Book: Dynastic and Corporal Network Building in the Arenberg
Family Portrait Album circa 1600

Marina Porri (Universities of Florence, Siena, and Pisa)
Marriage Portraits as Political Networking: The Medici Court at the End
of the Sixteenth Century

Discussion

17.15 – 17.30
Comfort Break

17.30 – 17.45
Closing Remarks: Alexander Röstel (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

17:45 – 18:45
Keynote Address
Prof. John Padgett (University of Chicago)
Networks in Renaissance Florence

18.45 – 20:00
Reception

Announcement: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

S.-Maria-gloriosa-dei-Frari-Title-page-1500-500.jpgWhat is the study of the church interior?

The church was a highly meaningful site for pre-Modern European society. As architectural sites accessible to all strata of society, church buildings provided contexts for interaction between social classes and genders, and settings for a wide variety of religious and non-religious activities. From an art-historical perspective, the vast majority of artworks produced in the medieval and Renaissance periods was intended for the many chapels, altars and screens in the church interior.

Yet, despite the obvious importance of these sites, the spatial dispositions of church interiors – and how they evolved over time – are still little-understood. Centuries of restorations and adaptations have radically transformed the appearance and usage of church interiors: screens have been removed; altars shifted position; new liturgical furnishings installed; fresco decoration whitewashed; and seating added or taken away.

Scholars studying the church interior seek to reconstruct the meaning, functions and visual appeal of these sacred spaces. The Society for the Study of the Church Interior seeks to promote this holistic and interdisciplinary approach to researching historic church buildings.

Who are we?

We are a group of scholars who are interested in the material culture, spatial dynamics and multifarious functions of the church interior in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We are mainly based in the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, but welcome members from around the world.

Primarily focused on pre-Modern Italy, we are interested in reconstructing aspects of individual churches, but also in broader issues associated with large-scale changes to architectural layouts generally associated with religious reform. In addition to purely art-historical inquiry, we investigate the religious, political or practical motivations behind transformation campaigns and the effects such changes had on the use of church buildings.

What do we do?

Studying the church interior presents complex challenges for the historian, given that documentary, archaeological and material sources can be fragmentary or even contradictory. Our research involves the analysis of several types of primary and secondary source material, which may include:

  • Original archival documentation such as payments, contracts, testaments, etc
  • Liturgical texts
  • Official records of Visitations conducted by bishops and other clergy
  • Historic ground plans
  • Antiquarian guidebooks
  • Modern restoration records
  • Material evidence of surviving architecture
  • Archaeological reports
  • Provenance of objects such as altarpieces and liturgical furnishings

What are the activities of the Society?

The Society promotes broader engagement with the study of the church interior, disseminates research findings and fosters an academic community of like-minded scholars.

In the future, we hope to organize sessions and meetings at major conferences such as the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting.

We are also in the process of establishing an online, collaborative database to collect data on the church interior. Initially concentrating on Italy, where the impact of the Counter Reformation was particularly strong, the database will reveal the broad patterns and chronologies which are currently beyond the grasp of the individual researcher. Members of the Society who wish to contribute to the database will receive a login to access it: please email Joanne or Michael if you are interested.

Sign up for the mailing list here.

CFP: Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers

hypnerotomachia-poliphili_1Call for Journal Submissions: Kunsttexte – Renaissance 2016: “Publishing in the Renaissance – Minor and Academic publishers”
Deadline: Nov 1, 2016

Some major publishers dominated the publishing scene in the
Renaissance, like Aldo Manuzio and his family in Venice, and the Giunti
family in Florence. From early on however there were many minor
publishers, often very engaged, but successful only for a few years.
These were often intellectuals, who followed special interests in their
publishing policy. In Florence there was Anton Francesco Doni, member
of the literary academy, who published his own works, but also those of
his academy fellows, for example the lessons they presented in the
Academy. His engagement did not lead to financial success and after a
few years he had to stop. In Venice Francesco Sansovino was a
likeminded, who published his own works as well and those of his
friends, and some literary editions. There are numerous examples of
private engagement in printing. We invite papers, which present in an
exemplary way minor printers in the Renaissance (in Italy, France,
Spain, Germany), concentrating on their formation, their printing
policy, their outreach and influence.

How to submit: The articles are due on November 1, 2016, but a short note of interest
would be welcome beforehand.  Papers are welcome in German, English,
French, Italian or Spanish. For more information about the open access
online journal Kunsttexte and for the author guidelines please look at
www.kunsttexte.de.
Please send inquiries and proposals to
Angela Dressen (adressen@itatti.harvard.edu)
Susanne Gramatzki (gramatz@uni-wuppertal.de)