Tag Archives: exchange

Conference: Heritage Revisited. Rediscovering Objects from Islamic Lands in Enlightenment Europe, Kunsthistorisches Institut, University of Vienna, September 20–21, 2018

0For centuries, objects from Islamic lands were unquestioned parts of the material and visual culture of pre-modern Latinate Europe. A textile from Fatimid Egypt, for instance, the so-called “Veil of Sainte Anne”, was kept in the cathedral treasury of Apt and venerated as a Christian relic.

The workshop “Heritage Revisited. Rediscovering Objects from Islamic Lands in Enlightenment Europe” is dedicated to the long eighteenth century, a period in which, so we believe, an important shift in the perception of such objects took place. Islamic provenances were rediscovered, objects were studied, drawn and discussed. Finally, they were subjected to the classificatory scheme of European modernity, which leaves little space for conceptions of a historically entangled heritage.

Object case-studies shed light on the networks of scholars and institutions involved in the rediscoveries and will be framed in the discussions within broader discourses on (European) cultural heritage. Ultimately, we wish to offer new perspectives on the history of scholarship, notably Islamic art history, but also on perceptions of cultural belonging, of “Europeanness” and “Otherness”, which deeply resonate with current societal concerns.

Registration deadline: Sep 15, 2018. Register by emailing mattia.guidetti@univie.ac.uk

Programme 
Thursday, 20th September 2018
Dom Museum Wien
Stephansplatz 6, 1010 Wien

10:00-11:30
Visit to the Dom Museum Wien
With Gregor Pirgie, Universität Wien; Pia Razenberger, Tabadul Project; Markus Ritter, Universität Wien.

Places for the visit are limited. Please register until 15th September 2018 – mattia.guidetti@univie.ac.uk

Universität Wien – Institut für Kunstgeschichte,
Universitätscampus Hof 9, Seminar Room 1
Garnisongasse 13, 1090 Wien

13:30-14:00
Welcome and Introduction
Isabelle Dolezalek, Technische Universität Berlin/SFB “Episteme in Bewegung” Freie Universität Berlin and Mattia Guidetti, Universität Wien.

“Collections”
Chair: Ebba Koch, Universität Wien

14:00-14:40
Elisabeth Rodini, Johns Hopkins University Baltimore: The Redaldi Inventory: a Prologue to Enlightenment Collecting

14:40-15:20
Federica Gigante, Ashmolean Museum Oxford: Objects of a “Certain Antiquity” and the Quest for their Cultural Context

Coffee

“Rediscovering Objects from Islamic Lands”
Chair: Barbara Karl, Textilmuseum St. Gallen

15:50-16:30
Claire Dillon, Columbia University New York: The Many Dimensions of a Work of Art: the Mantle of Roger II as a Case Study in Imperial Representation, Origin Stories, and the Formation of Specific Others

16:30-17:10
Michelina di Cesare, Sapienza Università di Roma: Four Eleventh and Twelfth-century Islamic Tombstones Discovered in Pozzuoli in the Seventeenth Century
Coffee (20 min.)

17:30-18:10
Carine Juvin, Musée du Louvre Paris: The “Baptistère de Saint-Louis” through the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: the Making of a “Historical Monument”

18:10-18:50
Anna Contadini, School of African and Oriental Studies London: Changing Perceptions of the Pisa Griffin and Other Objects

Dinner

Friday, 21st September 2018
Universität Wien – Institut für Kunstgeschichte,
Universitätscampus Hof 9, Seminar Room 1
Garnisongasse 13, 1090 Wien

“Protagonists of the Rediscoveries”
Chair: Johannes Wieninger, MAK Österreichisches Museum für angewandte Kunst Wien

9:30-10:10
Mattia Guidetti, Universität Wien: Reading Ottoman Flags in the Marches Region, 1684-1838

10:10-10:50
Markus Ritter, Universität Wien: A Documentary Encounter with Medieval (Islamic) Art in Eighteenth-century Vienna

10:50-11:30
Tobias Mörike, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg: Knowledge-brokers and Object-interpreters: Maronite Christians and the Redefinition of “Islamicate Objects” by the 1800s

Coffee

Discussion Tables
Chair: Isabelle Dolezalek, TU / FU, Berlin

12:00-12:40
Table I (Seminar Room 1)
Isabelle Dolezalek, TU / FU, Berlin: On the Concept of Cultural Heritage: what is European and what is not?

Table II (Seminar Room 2)
Tobias Mörike, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg: Art Market Networks and their Role in Constituting “Islamic Art” Objects

Table III (Seminar Room 3)
Barbara Karl, Textilmuseum St. Gallen: Object Biographies and Dynamics of Collecting

12:45-13:30 (Seminar Room 1)
Plenum discussion

Lunch

“Classifiying, Framing, Exhibiting”
Chair: Markus Ritter, Universität Wien

14:30-15:10
Sabine Du Crest, Université de Bordeaux: Islamic Border Objects in Seventeenth-century Europe

15:10-15:50
Gül Kale, Mc Gill University Montreal: Image as Text. Fischer von Erlach’s Take on Guillaume Grelot’s Drawings of Islamic Monuments in the Eighteenth Century

15:50-16:30
Ebba Koch, Universität Wien: Mughal Miniatures at Habsburg Vienna

Final Discussion

—-

Workshop conceived by Dr. Isabelle Dolezalek (Technische Universität Berlin, SFB “Episteme in Bewegung” Freie Universität Berlin) and Dr. Mattia Guidetti (Universität Wien)

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Fellowships at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies

220px-villa_i_tatti2c_ext-2c_giardino_05Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy is now accepting fellowship applications for the 2018–2019 academic year.
Deadline: November 15

Wallace Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore the historiography and impact of the Italian Renaissance in the Modern Era (19th–21st centuries).

Berenson Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral scholars who explore “Italy in the World”. Projects should address the transnational dialogues between Italy and other cultures (e.g. Latin American, Mediterranean, African, Asian, etc.) during the Renaissance, broadly understood historically to include the period from the 14th to the 17th century.

Digital Humanities Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for projects that cut across traditional disciplinary boundaries and actively employ digital technology. Applicants can be scholars in the humanities or social sciences, librarians, archivists, and data science professionals. Projects should apply digital technologies such as mapping, textual analysis, visualization, or the semantic web to topics on any aspect of the Italian Renaissance.

Villa I Tatti – Boğaziçi University Joint Fellowship (one year; deadline November 15) for post-doctoral research focusing on the interaction between Italy and the Byzantine Empire (ca. 1300 to ca. 1700). Scholars will spend a semester at Villa I Tatti and a semester at the Byzantine Studies Research Center of Boğaziçi University.

Craig Hugh Smyth Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for curators and conservators. Projects can address any aspect of the Italian Renaissance art or architecture, including landscape architecture.

David and Julie Tobey Fellowship (four or six months; deadline November 15) for research on drawings, prints, and illustrated manuscripts from the Italian Renaissance, and especially the role that these works played in the creative process, the history of taste and collecting, and questions of connoisseurship.

For more information on all fellowships at Villa I Tatti please visit http://itatti.harvard.edu/fellowships

CFP: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM journal

Call for Contributions: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM. Exchanges and Interactions in the Arts of Medieval Europe, Byzantium, and the Mediterranean, special issue edited by Elisabetta Scirocco (Bibliotheca Hertziana – MPI) and Gerhard Wolf (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – MPI), published March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 20 September 2017
Deadline for article submission: 30 November 2017

tavola_strozzi_-_napoli
This thematic issue of the journal Convivium is dedicated to the Italian South from the 5th to the 15th century. It seeks papers that engage with the specific transcultural dynamics of a geographical and historical area containing highly diverse political, social, and religious entities, as well as with the multi-layered connectivities that can be traced in the Italian South, across the Mediterranean, and beyond.

We invite contributions from Art History, Archaeology, History, Anthropology, Paleography, and related disciplines that deal with the cultural diversity of Late Antique and medieval Southern Italy with special attention to sites, monuments, landscapes, images, and objects, as well as to the visual and aesthetic spheres in general. We are primarily interested in exploring horizontal and vertical dynamics, in terms of time (synchronicity/diachronicity) and space (global/Mediterranean/local scales). Papers with a theoretical and historiographical approach are particularly welcome.

Main topics to be addressed might include:

-Artistic contacts and interactions in the Italian South, in a transregional and global perspective
-Centripetal and centrifugal paths of exchange, transmission, and appropriation
-Cross-cultural migration of objects, images, and techniques among spaces, contexts, and media: practices of reuse, appropriation, and interpretation
-Sites, places, and spaces of cultural interactions, such as cities and courts
-Religious interactions in sacred space and rituals
-Local persistence and reinterpretation of the (antique) past in different political and/or cultural scenarios
-The fascination of the (medieval) Italian South, from the 18th century to the present day
-The notion of “Southern Italian”, as it relates to the study of medieval art, and its historiographical consequences

Proposals of max. 1 page should be sent by 20​ ​September 2017 to the editors: escirocco@gmail.com and dirwolf@khi.fi.it. The deadline for the submission of articles is 30 November 2017.

Convivium V/1 will be published in March 2018.

Articles Submission:
Contributions (30,000-40,000 characters including spaces, and up to 15 full-color illustrations) must be sent by 30 November 2017 to Karolina Foletti, executive editor of the journal: karolina.foletti@gmail.com.
Languages accepted: English, French, German, Italian.
Each article will be evaluated through a double-blind peer-review process.

For the Style Guide, please see: http://www.earlymedievalstudies.com/convivium.html

CFP: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018

avila-753643_1920Call for Papers: Rethinking the Medieval Frontier, University of Leeds, 10 April 2018
Deadline: 1 February 2018

Few topics in medieval studies have as much current relevance and activity as frontiers and borders. Yet approaches to their study in the Middle Ages are often untheorised, and
compare, if at all, only to often outdated studies of the ancient or modern world. Yet
medievalists are well placed, given the richness of their material and the complexity of
medieval politics and society, to challenge such ‘classical’ ideas of The Frontier, whose
weaknesses are now being exposed by current events. A fully comparative approach to the possibilities of what it meant to establish, live in or contest a frontier or border zone shown by the societies of late Antiquity and the Middle Ages can power the development of a new shared understanding of the processes at work where borders are laid down or transgressed.

The project Rethinking the Medieval Frontier has been exploring such ideas since 2015. Its first one-day conference, made possible by a British Academy/Leverhulme Trust Small Research Grant, will take place on 10th April 2018. Scholars at all levels working on frontiers and borders within the period 100-1500 CE, in any geographical area, are invited to offer papers addressing questions such as these:
§ Who defines or defined a frontier, and with what effect?
§ How did the medieval understanding of the world envisage or describe frontiers?
§ How was a frontier physically constituted?
§ Did military frontiers differ from other sorts of border, and if so how?
§ How do archaeologists’ views of medieval frontiers compare to those of historians?
§ What persons or groups crossed medieval borders, and why? Who was prevented from
doing so, and how effectively?
§ What persons or groups lived in border zones, for what reasons?
§ How far did frontiers and borders create or inform medieval identities?
§ How do the insights of other disciplines studying frontiers apply to medieval societies,
and how do medievalist disciplines differ in their study of frontiers?
Papers should be up to 15 minutes long and may be exploratory or experimental.
Comparison of more than one medieval society is encouraged. Titles and abstracts should be received by 1st February 2018. It may not be possible to accept all submissions. Some travel bursaries are available to allow attendance which might otherwise not be possible, including from outside the UK.
Submissions, as well as any other queries, should be sent to Jonathan Jarrett, School of History, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT, j.jarrett@leeds.ac.uk.

CFP: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018

michelino_molinari_da_besozzo_-_st-_luke_painting_the_virgin_-_google_art_projectCall for Papers: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018
Deadline: 20 September 2017

The multimedia fluidity of artists and artisans in the later Middle Ages is an area ripe for investigation. Across diverse regions in Europe and beyond, many illuminators, both named and anonymous, engaged in forms of art-making in addition to the decoration of manuscript books. Some painted frescoes, panels, and ephemera, while others provided designs and supervised the production of stained glass, enamels, tapestries, and other objects. With some frequency, those who specialized in other media were in turn called upon to illuminate books. While modern studies have focused on individual examples of such multi-media talent, the broader implications of this intermedial fluency remain obscure: within the wider art-historical canon, manuscript illumination as an art form is largely seen as derivative or prone to influence from large-scale media.
This session seeks to re-examine the relationship between manuscript illumination and other fields of artistic endeavor in the later Middle Ages. How did artists themselves consider the differing characteristics and ontologies of these varied supports? How did painters adapt their style and working method when engaging with other media and other categories of object? Did the presence of local guild regulations curtail or encourage multi-media practice, and how did this compare region-to-region or to contexts outside of Western Europe? Beyond evident differences in scale, pricing, and technique, interesting issues arise regarding patronage and audience: how different was the clientele for manuscripts compared to that for painting, for example? How did the relative accessibility and visibility of differing art forms affect the visual solutions achieved? Is a book-bound image “freer” or more experimental than a publically visible one?
The session asks these and other questions relevant to those studying the social contexts of art production, the dynamics of reception, materiality, and the technical characteristics of objects. It seeks to be open-minded in terms of methodological approach, and aims to bring together scholars working on diverse material, in order to initiate a larger conversation that can impact the discipline of art history as a whole.
Please send proposals with a one-page abstract and a completed Participant Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to Nicholas Herman (hermanni@upenn.edu) by 20 September 2017.

CFP: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

CfP ICMA Kalamazoo 2018 Moving People Shifting FrontiersCall for Papers: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean, International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13 2018
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Organizers: Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne) and Maria Alessia Rossi (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artifacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

CFP: Textile Gifts in the Middle Ages – Objects, Actors, and Representations

fb6e7e0f36Call for Papers: Textile Gifts in the Middle Ages – Objects, Actors, and Representations (Textilschenkungen im Mittelalter)
Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Rome, November 3-4 2016.
Deadline: March 24, 2016

As art history has given greater attention to material culture and its social contexts as a whole, the applied arts have also re-entered the scope of art historical discourse. Cultural-historical approaches, such as those employed in material culture studies, explore the objectness of artifacts and their efficacy. Related are studies of objects as mediums of symbolic communication, in which such objects are described and interpreted as part of complex performances of ritual and ceremony. Gifts of textiles in the Middle Ages provide a test field for the evaluation of such questions and approaches for the discipline of art history.

Gifts of textiles and clothing appeared in diverse contexts and fulfilled various functions in pre-modern Europe. They could be offered in the course of an initiation rite and or an act of social transition, including upon investiture, marriage, or entry into a monastery. Gifts of clothing to the poor, meanwhile, were among the works of charity thematized in the vitae of numerous medieval saints. Sumptuous textiles were sent as resplendent gifts to religious institutions or, like patterned silk textiles from Byzantium, circulated through diplomatic gift exchanges. Gifts of clothing were also distributed within the court as compensation in kind, which supported the structuralization and hierarchization of courtly society. Gifts of clothing could represent the donor. Especially in the case of clothing previously worn by its donor, the physical presence of the giver might have been woven into the materiality and form of the gifted garment.

The goal of this interdisciplinary conference is to situate the diversity and polysemy of such acts of symbolic communication into the broader context of medieval gift culture.

Already in the 1920s, Marcel Mauss showed that gift giving established social relationships and was composed of three necessary elements: giving, accepting, and reciprocating (the “principle of reciprocity”). At play in such exchanges is essentially the construction of power and social hierarchies. While Mauss’ theory has long been employed within medieval studies, recent criticism has pointed out that the particular efficacy resulting from the material and visual qualities of gifts has not been sufficiently addressed, as studies applying Mauss’ model concentrate primarily on donors, recipients, and their interaction. In other words, the context of the exchange has been privileged over the objects of exchange (Cecily Hilsdale, 2012). With its focus on images and objects, art history is poised to show how the dynamics of reciprocity and its attendant obligations might be charged both visually and materially.

The conference focuses on textile gifts in pre-modern Europe in order to explore such questions in greater detail. The integration of anthropological models into an art historical approach allows for gifted artifacts to be taken seriously as independent entities within the giving process as a socially generative form of communication. The relationship between the actors and the “agency” of gifts themselves can therefore be further explored (Bruno Latour).

We invite paper proposals from the field of art history and related disciplines, such as history, anthropology, archaeology, and literature. Papers might address the following subjects in particular:
– Textile gifts as acts of symbolic communication in the Middle Ages:
Especially welcome are case studies that illustrate the act of giving and the sense of obligation generated between donor and recipient and that, in so doing, attend to the visual and material efficacy of textile gifts. Papers might consider gifts of personal garments, like the gifting of a sovereign’s mantle to an ecclesiastical institution, and the honor—or affront—such gifts might entail.
– Methodological reflections on the suitability of anthropological models for medieval art history:
How helpful are anthropological models (Marcel Mauss’ gift theory and its lineage) in understanding and interpreting pre-modern textile gifts? We begin with the premise that no single general theory is capable of explaining every gift act definitively. Rather, a number of approaches originating in Mauss, some of which are controversial, could be debated within the context of medieval textile gifts.
– The relationship of textile gifts as performative acts to their representations:
How were medieval textile gifts represented in word and image? What relationship do these representations have to their material prototypes (surviving textile gifts) and their contexts (acts of donation)?
– Gendered aspects of textile gifts:
Could textile gifts in the Middle Ages be gender-specific? Can we observe different behavioral patterns in the gifting practices of men and women?
– Re-use and re-contextualization of textile gifts:
The appreciation, use, and conservation of medieval textile gifts, including their restoration or alteration, can reveal much about how recipient institutions dealt with their donations. How, for example, did recipients interpret and use textile gifts in the formation of their identities? How did such a process shape the relationship between a recipient institution and its donor?

Submission: Proposals for talks should be sent in the form of an abstract (max 1 page) with a brief CV by March, 24th, 2016 to Christiane Elster (elster@biblhertz.it).