Tag Archives: jewish

Job: Tenure-track Assistant Professor of Late Antique or Medieval History, Department of History, Stony Brook University

856 9802Job: Tenure-track Assistant Professor of Late Antique or Medieval History, Department of History, Stony Brook University
Deadline: 1 December 2017

The Department of History at Stony Brook University invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor of late antique or medieval history. Our search encompasses all fields and areas of medieval European, Mediterranean, and/or Near Eastern history, ca. 200–1400 CE. Preferred qualifications: ability to teach a range of undergraduate lectures and seminars in late antique and/or medieval history; research and teaching interests that relate and can contribute to one or more of our graduate program thematic clusters (Global connections, empire, capitalism; Health, science, environment; Race, citizenship, migration; Religion, gender, cultural identity; States, nations, political cultures).  We also welcome interdisciplinary candidates whose historical work addresses social, cultural, economic, and/or political processes; who engage with material and/or visual cultures; and/or who can participate in Stony Brook’s Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations.

To receive consideration, applications must be received no later than December 1, 2017.

A complete application consists of the following: 1) cover letter, 2) curriculum vitae, 3) teaching statement, 4) research statement, 5) three letters of reference, and 6) a completed State employment application form. The form can be found here: https://www.asa.stonybrook.edu/asa/ASAForms/Department/HRS/Document/HRSF0113

We will begin reviewing files on December 1, with first-round Skype interviews planned for January 2018, and campus visits in February 2018. Inquiries may be directed to Sara Lipton: sara.lipton@stonybrook.edu.

Special Notes: 1) The selected candidate must clear a background investigation. 2) This is a tenure-track position. 3) This FLSA-exempt position is not eligible for the overtime provisions of the FLSA. 4) Stony Brook University is 100% tobacco free as of January 1, 2016; see stonybrook.edu/tobaccofree.

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Post-doc: 3 positions at the University of Louvain, ‘The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission’

photoPost-doc: 3 position, 3-year contracts, ERC Advanced project 740618: The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission (2017-2022), Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium
Deadline: 10 November 2017

PhilAnd is a five-year Advanced ERC project to start in October 2017 at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) under the supervision of Prof. Godefroid de Callataÿ. The objective of PhilAnd is to conduct a large-scale exploration of how, and under which form, philosophy appeared for the first time in al-Andalus. At the crossroads of several major lines of enquiries in modern scholarship and in line with recent discoveries having important chronological implications, PhilAnd focuses on the 10th century, a period usually disregarded by historians on the assumption that philosophy as such was not cultivated in the Iberian Peninsula before the 11th-12th centuries. Its originality is also to put emphasis on ‘ill-defined’ materials and channels of transmission, a field which remains largely unexplored. PhilAnd will be conducted in partnership with the Warburg Institute (University of London).
As part of this project, three post-doc positions of three years each (to start from 2 January 2018) are offered at the UCL in relation with the three following sub-projects (SP):
1) the Ikhwān al-afā’: This SP will aim at producing a comprehensive survey of all the elements which are likely to inform us about the chronology of redaction and – where applicable – of introduction into al-Andalus of the three works that have commonly been ascribed in sources to this most influential group of thinkers known as Ikhwān al-Ṣafā’ (‘The Brethren of Purity’), namely: a) the Rasā’il (‘the Epistles’); b) the Risāla Jāmi‘a (‘The Comprehensive Epistle’) and, c) the Risāla Jāmi‘at al-Jāmi‘a (‘The Super-Comprehensive Epistle’). This chronology is currently far from clear.
2) Ibn Washiyya and the Nabatean Corpus: This SP aims to evaluate the impact of the Filāḥa Nabaṭiyya (‘The Nabatean Agriculture’), a complex and enigmatic Arabic treatise on agriculture written in the Orient, on the development of both Islamic and Jewish Neoplatonism in al-Andalus from the 10th to the 12th century. The focus will be on the reception of the ‘philosophical’ and bāṭinī (rather than agronomical) aspects of the work, with the aim of understanding why this notoriously esoteric work remained so influential even to Jewish thinkers like Judah Halevi and Maimonides.
3) Ibn Masarra: This SP will lead to the first monograph entirely devoted to Ibn Masarra’s Kitāb khawāṣṣ al-ḥurūf (‘The Book of the Properties of Letters’), consisting of an extensively annotated translation of this mystical treatise, together with an in-depth exploration of its place in the history of ‘ilm al-ḥurūf, the Islamic science of letters – including its links with the Jewish Kabbala – up to the time of Ibn ‘Arabī. This will fill an important gap and provide a valuable resource for the study of Islamic mysticism in al-Andalus.

The qualifications required for any of these sub-projects are:

  1. a PhD in Islamic Studies, in Middle Eastern Studies, or related fields;
  2. an excellent command of Classical Arabic (the knowledge of additional languages such as ancient Greek, Latin and in particular Hebrew is considered an advantage);
  3. a first-rate track record and research experience;
  4. publications of articles in peer-reviewed international journals or monographs with recognized academic publishers;
  5. academic writing and presentation skills in English (the working language of the project);
  6. the ability to work both individually and as part of a team.

These three post-doc positions are full-time equivalent. They are offered for a period of 12 months, renewable twice (three years in total) upon good performance. The post-docs retained will be required to reside in Belgium for the whole period of their fellowship. They will be asked to contribute to the intellectual life of the ERC project and of the UCL.


How to apply?

Applications should be made via pdf files and contain the following:

(1) a cover letter setting out the candidate’s qualifications and motivation for applying for one of the three positions offered (maximum 2 pages);

(2) a curriculum vitae (maximum 3 pages);

(3) a list of publications;

(4) two samples of published work (articles, chapters) in pdf (preferably in English);

(5) a transcript of grades and/or copy of the PhD certificate;

(6) the name (with title, affiliation and email) of four people who have accepted to be contacted as potential referees.
Applications should be made electronically and sent to the following address:

godefroid.decallatay@uclouvain.be

The application deadline is 10 November 2017
Interviews will be arranged between 4 and 6 December 2017.

Candidates selected for the interviews will be contacted by mid-November 2017, and asked to write a short research design on a topic to be announced at that moment.

Employment should become effective from 2 January 2018.

CFP: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan

bean20ms120-20folio2080l20-20liturgy20of20the20deadCall for Papers: ‘Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance,’ 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan
Deadline: 15 September 2017
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Medieval Colloquium at the University of Virginia invites graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars to submit papers for a session entitled “Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance” at the 53nd International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 10-13, 2018) in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Abstracts of up to 250 words for a 15-20-minute paper should be submitted on or before September 15, 2017 via Google Forms (visit http://bit.ly/liturgyform). All entries will undergo blinded peer review. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decisions via email by Friday, September 22.

Medieval Liturgy: Text and Performance

This panel turns on a rather simple (or simplistic) question: is liturgy a text or a performance? The howls of dissent rise up – Who would ask such a thing? The answer is both, of course! In response, this panel invites graduate students, affiliated faculty, and independent scholars to respond to the dichotomy of text/performance even as they replace it with their own set of questions to guide the future study of liturgy as text, music, and/or drama. Among other concerns, how are the textual and bodily experiences of liturgy coeval, or even co-constitutive, in the Middle Ages? In what ways do liturgical texts both organize and find their roots in ritual reenactments that involve procession, genuflection, and acts of proskynesis? What episodes and anecdotes from the Middle Ages reveal how liturgical text is entangled with the environment in which it is read, sung, translated, or performed?

The panel aims to create a conversation that goes beyond the traditional practice of liturgical exegesis to a more active, embodied study of the liturgy in Catholic, Orthodox, and Jewish traditions. Since unpacking the meaning of a somatic study of liturgy is the prime goal of the session, participants may use movement, travel, and the kineticism of objects as organizing principles for their work or ask how scholars actually perform or participate in the liturgies they study. Interesting avenues include discussions of the materiality of liturgy, from enduring forms to ephemera, via a close look at manuscripts, printed books, sacred instruments, vestments, relics, urban layouts, decorations for processions, and the architecture of churches, chapels, and tombs. We particularly invite work that pushes the boundary of what is currently considered the purview of “liturgy and ritual studies,” explores some aspect of space and sound, and pertains to the smell, touch, and taste of the liturgy in North Africa, Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Russia, and the Byzantine world.

Session co-chairs:
Justin Greenlee (jgg3mb@virginia.edu) and DeVan Ard (dda8xx@virginia.edu)