Tag Archives: Italy

CFP: NUME, Research Group on the Latin Middle Ages, 4th Cycle, Florence, 3-7th June 2018

logoconscritta_1537385121_2306Call for Papers: NUME, Research Group on the Latin Middle Ages, 4th Cycle, June 2018

NUME, Research Group on the Latin Middle Ages, organizes the IV Cycle of Medieval Studies, June 2018.

The goal is to offer a broad overview of the current situation of Italian and international medievalist studies. Issues which are related to many different aspects of the medieval period (V-XV century) can be addressed: history, philosophy, politics, literature, art, archeology, material culture, new technologies applied to medieval studies and so on;
Contributions with two or more speakers are accepted;
Contributions will be structured in specific panels.

The conference will be held from 3rd to 7th June 2018 at the Auditorium Ente Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze, via Folco Portinari, 5 (Florence, Italy).

How to apply” Participation proposals must have abstract format, in Italian or English, not exceeding 300 words. They will have to be sent, along with a CV, by January 15, 2018 at the following e-mail address:
info@nuovomedioevo.it

Proposals will be evaluated by the Review Board on the basis of quality, interest and originality. The judgment of the Commission will be unquestionable.

The Commission will notify the convocation for the speakers considered suitable by February 1, 2018.

The selected speakers will be asked to prepare an oral intervention, accompanied by any images or videos, not exceeding 15 minutes (+5’ discussion time). Contextually, they will be asked to send a paper of their contribution for the Conference Proceedings by April 1, 2018.

Speakers will be required a participation fee of 100€, which, in addition to supporting the activities of the NUME Research Group, will entitle to 2 free copies of the Conference Proceedings.

The Conference program will be published by April 30, 2018.

The deadlines set out in this notice must be strictly observed, otherwise the contribution will be excluded from the call.

Further info at: www.nuovomedioevo.it

Advertisements

Conference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 November 2017

san-giacomo-dall-orioConference: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Venice, 9-10 Nov 2017, Ca’ Foscari University, Venice, November 9 – 10, 2017

“La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio: una trama millenaria di arte e fede” (Chiese di Venezia, Nuove prospettive di ricerca, 6), cur. by Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini and Deborah Howard

Like every Venetian parish church, the evolution of San Giacomo dall’Orio has been closely interconnected with the development of the surrounding area. Its free-standing site, however, remains unusual, shared only by the church of Santa Maria Formosa; like the latter, its facade addresses the canal while the apses project into the campo.
Over the centuries the parish became progressively marginalised: the area within the original parish boundaries is now landlocked, with access to the Grand Canal only possible by means of a network of small canals.  The availability of land and the spread of modest, functional housing blocks for artisans and workers — combined with the distance from the centre (which became dominated by the San Marco-Rialto axis) — led to the development of the area around San Giacomo dall’Orio as an industrial zone, dedicated in particular to wool manufacture.
Although the area became primarily a popular quarter, it still preserves several palaces erected by noble families, among them that of the diarist Marin Sanudo.  In addition, the city’s first anatomy theatre was located in the present Corte dell’Anatomia, while in 1671, thanks to an initiative of the Loredan family, the College of Surgeons was founded on the south side of the church.
This conference, therefore, aims to address the more general social and urban characteristics of the parish, and to contextualise the church within the varied daily life of the campo.  This space hosted a range of activities: ludic (remaining unpaved until the eighteenth century, it was used as a football field, even by players from noble families); religious (it was the scene of numerous confraternity processions); and socio-economic (including the practice of crafts).
The church of San Giacomo dall’Orio was probably founded towards the end of the tenth century, even if its documented status as a parish only dates back to 1130.  Rebuilt in 1225, the church acquired its main elements thanks to radical restorations after the earthquake of 1345: the aisled transepts and the present ship’s-keel roof probably date from this time.
Between the end of the Quattrocento and the mid Cinquecento the church was subject to various renovations in the presbytery, nave and aisles, leading to its present configuration.  In particular, following the removal of the rood screen at the entrance to the presbytery, the stalls were transferred to the apse.  The organ was relocated to a wooden organ loft over the main entrance portal — one of the oldest surviving examples of this arrangement.
After the mid Cinquecento, various alterations mainly concerned the interior, which houses works by such celebrated artists as Veronese and Palma Giovane.  Moreover, the parish became the setting for the altars and ritual activities of numerous confraternities, including the important Scuola del Sacramento, whose members came from a wide social range.
Interventions since the middle of the Settecento include the addition of partition walls in the transepts (later removed), the construction of a new sacristy during a programme of structural and decorative repairs at the start of the twentieth century, and, fifty years ago, a complete refurbishment of the presbytery.
Spoils and precious marbles – such as the flecked black marble Ionic column and the unusual polylobed holy water stoop – remained long after these had passed out of fashion.  The beautiful marble pulpit is unique in the city.  At the same time, the almost complete absence of wall-tombs and the relative lack of family chapels serve to underline that this was a popular quarter with few elite families.  One of the most important patrons was the parish priest Giovanni Maria da Ponte, who commissioned a cycle of paintings for the Old Sacristy.  The eucharistic symbol in the centre of the ceiling by Palma il Giovane, not to mention the Sacrament Chapel itself, indicate the growing devotion to the Holy Sacrament.  Even if the apostolic visitations of the late sixteenth-century mention certain deficiencies, the programme of artistic renewal during the Counter Reformation reflects the parish’s serious response to post-Tridentine reforms.
The remarkable spatial and artistic coherence that characterises the whole building is not easily explained by the usual practices of art-historical and architectural analysis.  It is now recognised, of course, that an appreciation of the ceremonial, liturgical and devotional practices, especially those connected with the life and character of the parish, constitute an essential element in the understanding of a sacred building and its many individual details.  The proposed conference therefore seeks to interpret this historic church within its broader historical and geographical context.
The dissemination of knowledge of Venetian churches, to audiences of experts and non-specialists alike, is a characteristic of the conferences organized by the project “Chiese di Venezia. Nuove prospettive di ricerca”. The wide participation of the public (at the sessions and guided tours) in the five conferences organized annually since 2011 has demonstrated the effectiveness of this type of gathering.
Visits to the church will be organised as part of the programme.

Program
9, November
– Ca’ Dolfin, 10.00-13.00
10.00-10.15 Registration
10.15-10.30 Welcome. Martina Frank (Università Ca’ Foscari), Gianmario Guidarelli (Università degli Studi di Padova)
10.30-10.45 Introduction. Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Deborah Howard
Session “Il contesto urbano”, chair: Deborah Howard (University of Cambridge)
10.45-11.15, Michela Agazzi (Università Ca’ Foscari), “San Giacomo dall’Orio, il contesto”

11.15-11.30 Coffee break

11.30-12.00 Edoardo Demo (Università degli Studi di Verona), “Società e vita industriale”
12.00 -12.30 Jane Stevens Crawshaw (Oxford Brookes University), “Life, death and the Anatomy Theatre in early modern Venice”
12.30-13.00 Discussion
13.00-14.30 Lunch

-Ca’ Dolfin, 14.30-18.15
Session “La vita della parrocchia”, chair Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova)
14.30-15.00 Pascal Vuillemin (Université Savoie Mont Blanc, “Una parrocchia tra due sedi: San Giacomo dall’Orio nel Medioevo (XII-XV secc.)”
15.00-15.45 Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari) and Jean-François Chauvard (Université de Lyon 2), “Appunti sugli stati delle anime a San Giacomo a fine Cinquecento”
15.45-16.15 Discussion
16.15-16.45 Coffee break

16.45-17.15 Francesco Trentini (Università Ca’ Foscari), “L’apostolo, il matamoros, il pellegrino. Le molteplici connotazioni del titolo di San Giacomo dall’Orio (secoli X-XVI)”
17.15-1745 Elena Quaranta(Università Ca’ Foscari), “Musica e musicisti a San Giacomo dall’Orio: un’indagine archivistica”
17.45-18.15 Discussion

novembre, 10th
Ca’ Dolfin, 9.30-12.45
-Session “Conservazione e trasformazione”, chair Isabella Cecchini (Università Ca’ Foscari)
9.30-10.00 Massimo Bisson (Università degli Studi di Padova), “Il complesso dell’organo: trasformazioni architettoniche e funzionalità liturgica”
10.00-10.30 Adriano Amendola (Università degli Studi di Salerno), “Tra Oriente e Occidente: i marmi policromi della chiesa di San Giacomo dall’Orio”
10.30-11.00 Discussion
11.00-11.15 Coffee break

11.15-11.45 Marie-Louise Lillywhite (University of Warwick), “The Decorative Programme after the Council of Trent”
11.45-12.15 Thomas Worthen (Drake University), Altars and other furnishings for the Scuola del SS. Sacramento in San Giacomo dall’Orio
12.15-12.45 Discussion
12.45-15.00 lunch

15.00-17.00 Church of di San Giacomo dall’Orio, Session “in situ”, Massimo Bisson, Isabella Cecchini, Gianmario Guidarelli, Deborah Howard.

Reference / Quellennachweis:
CONF: La chiesa e la parrocchia di San Giacomo dall’Orio (Venice, 9-10 Nov 17). In: ArtHist.net, Oct 19, 2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/16534>.

Conference: Art and Economy in France and Italy in the 14th century: new research

giottotodeleteConference: Art et économie en France et en Italie au XIVe siècle. Nouvelles enquêtes,Art et économie en France et en Italie au XIVe siècle. Nouvelles enquêtes, Université de Lausanne, 19-20 October 2017

 

 

Programme:

Jeudi 19 octobre 2017

Nicolas Bock, Michele Tomasi
Introduction

14h30 L’Italie au Trecento et au Quattrocento : da Giotto alla morte !

Damien Cerutti
Giotto & Cie. Réflexions sur le marché pictural florentin dans le deuxième quart du Trecento

Katalin Prajda
Finanze e attività imprenditoriale nelle industrie pittoriche, orafe e di carpenteria nella Firenze del primo Rinascimento. Come la seta divenne una specialità fiorentina

Fabio Marcelli
Arte, civiltà comunale ed economia nell’Appennino umbro-marchigiano

Giampaolo Ermini
Il cantiere del coro trecentesco del duomo di Orvieto: manovalanza, materiali, costi e finanziamenti

Paola Vitolo
Spese della morte: investimenti per l’aldilà (e per l’al di qua) e pratica artistica (Italia, XIII-XIV secolo)

 

Vendredi 20 octobre 2017

9h00 Les arts de luxe

Chiara Maggioni
Orfèvreries à Mantoue au XIVe siècle : frais, évaluations, valeurs de marché

Andrea Cravero
Vetri dorati e graffiti del basso medioevo: economia di una bottega assisiate e mercato fiorentino

Giampaolo Distefano
Le occasioni del mercato artistico parigino del Trecento e la carriera dell’orafo Jean le Braelier

11h30  Entre l’Italie et la France

Teodoro De Giorgio
La riorganizzazione del sistema fiscale della corte pontificia avignonese sotto Giovanni XXII (1316-1334) e il nuovo volto del mecenatismo artistico papale

Alain Salamagne
L’usage du bois précieux dans le château en France et en Bourgogne (1350-1450)

14h00 Perspectives méditerranéennes

Doron Bauer
Economic Fluctuations and Artistic Production in The Kingdom of Majorca

Francesco Ruvolo
Prima di Antonello. Nuovi culti, spazio sacro e potere economico, nella Messina tra Due e Trecento

15h00  En ouvrant encore les horizons

Étienne Anheim
L’économie du travail artistique au XIVe siècle en France et en Italie

Wim Blockmans
La spécificité du secteur de l’art dans l’économie du bas Moyen Âge
Conclusions

 

CFP: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM journal

Call for Contributions: ‘The Italian South: Transcultural Perspectives 400-1500,’ CONVIVIUM. Exchanges and Interactions in the Arts of Medieval Europe, Byzantium, and the Mediterranean, special issue edited by Elisabetta Scirocco (Bibliotheca Hertziana – MPI) and Gerhard Wolf (Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – MPI), published March 2018
Deadline for proposals: 20 September 2017
Deadline for article submission: 30 November 2017

tavola_strozzi_-_napoli
This thematic issue of the journal Convivium is dedicated to the Italian South from the 5th to the 15th century. It seeks papers that engage with the specific transcultural dynamics of a geographical and historical area containing highly diverse political, social, and religious entities, as well as with the multi-layered connectivities that can be traced in the Italian South, across the Mediterranean, and beyond.

We invite contributions from Art History, Archaeology, History, Anthropology, Paleography, and related disciplines that deal with the cultural diversity of Late Antique and medieval Southern Italy with special attention to sites, monuments, landscapes, images, and objects, as well as to the visual and aesthetic spheres in general. We are primarily interested in exploring horizontal and vertical dynamics, in terms of time (synchronicity/diachronicity) and space (global/Mediterranean/local scales). Papers with a theoretical and historiographical approach are particularly welcome.

Main topics to be addressed might include:

-Artistic contacts and interactions in the Italian South, in a transregional and global perspective
-Centripetal and centrifugal paths of exchange, transmission, and appropriation
-Cross-cultural migration of objects, images, and techniques among spaces, contexts, and media: practices of reuse, appropriation, and interpretation
-Sites, places, and spaces of cultural interactions, such as cities and courts
-Religious interactions in sacred space and rituals
-Local persistence and reinterpretation of the (antique) past in different political and/or cultural scenarios
-The fascination of the (medieval) Italian South, from the 18th century to the present day
-The notion of “Southern Italian”, as it relates to the study of medieval art, and its historiographical consequences

Proposals of max. 1 page should be sent by 20​ ​September 2017 to the editors: escirocco@gmail.com and dirwolf@khi.fi.it. The deadline for the submission of articles is 30 November 2017.

Convivium V/1 will be published in March 2018.

Articles Submission:
Contributions (30,000-40,000 characters including spaces, and up to 15 full-color illustrations) must be sent by 30 November 2017 to Karolina Foletti, executive editor of the journal: karolina.foletti@gmail.com.
Languages accepted: English, French, German, Italian.
Each article will be evaluated through a double-blind peer-review process.

For the Style Guide, please see: http://www.earlymedievalstudies.com/convivium.html

Summer School: University and Diversity (Bologna, 6-14 Oct 17)

700px-bologna_panoramaSummer School: University and Diversity, Bologna, October 6 – 14, 2017
Deadline: May 1, 2017

University and Diversity: The Bolognese Experience (1088-2017)
Studienkurs of the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz –Max-Planck-Institut

In 2013, the Municipality of Bologna set up a competition to find a
logo that represents ‘at a local, national and international level’ all
the ‘features and elements that make up the face of the city’. The
winning project ‘è Bologna’ provides a visual translation of the
endless perceptions of the city, linking letters to geometrical forms
inspired by archetypical Bolognese images, such as the city walls and
the brick mosaic of Santo Stefano. By typing a script, these forms are
superimposed with fixed proportions and chromatic relationships. Thus,
written words generate different but related signs that render the
‘multiplicity of elements which describe Bologna’.

The 2017 Summer School (Studienkurs) of the KHI focuses on
‘universitas’ and ‘diversitas’, concepts that are emblematic of Bologna
from the medieval to the modern period. The idea that the sum of all
things comprises a whole entity (‘universum’) provides a starting point
for exploring the city, whose urban fabric is characterized by its
former canals, medieval towers and porticoes. Bologna’s university, the
‘Alma Mater Studiorum’, considered to be founded in 1088, encapsulates
the city’s manifest identities through its original organization as a
conglomeration of loose societies called ‘nations’; the teaching of
canon and civil law and medicine; and the training of personages such
as Petrarch, Leon Battista Alberti and Copernicus. Bologna as a
cosmopolitan city is shaped further by its relationship to religious
institutions (the Dominicans and the Papacy, for example); by persons
acting on an ‘international’ scale, such as the Bentivoglio, Gabriele
Paleotti, Ugo Buoncompagni (Pope Gregory  XIII), Pier Paolo Pasolini;
and by the artworks within the city of Nicola Pisano, Giotto, Raphael,
Giambologna or the Carracci. Carlo Cesare Malvasia, writing in the
seventeenth century, described Bologna as the ‘metropolis of a kingdom’
due to its role as the capital of ancient Etruria and as the ‘school of
the universe’ for having taught philosophy, letters and religion before
all other cities. The images of the city as an important geographical
crossroad linking central and northern Italy to the rest of Europe and
as hub of learning, culture and avant-garde thinking pervades into
modern times. They impacted, for example, the tragic bombing of the
city during World War II or the Neo-Fascist attack at the Central
Station in 1980, a site that in recent years witnessed the construction
of the Alta ‘velocità’ railway, with its projected architectural
complex by Isozaki-Maffei.

The seemingly disparate histories of Bologna will be explored through
notions of ‘universitas’ and ‘diversitas’ in an attempt to better
understand the common links that, just as in the dynamic logo, comprise
the character of the city and will allow the Summer School to engage,
more generally, with the mechanisms that contribute to the cultural
constructions of multi-faceted urban centres and their relationship to
surrounding and interconnected environments. Shifting between
synchronic and diachronic approaches, topics to be explored, through
individual presentations and discussions, include: Santo Stefano and
its artistic and religious connections to the Eastern Mediterranean;
Bolognese manuscript illumination and its ‘international’ impact; the
open-air tombs of professors of law and medicine; ‘foreign’ cults
within the city, such as the Madonna di San Luca and the Madonna of
Guadalupe; spaces as places for display and as sites of alterity:
relics, bodies and burials of saints (e.g., St Dominic and St Caterina
Vigri), anatomical waxes, collections of natural objects and artefacts
with transcultural trajectories, especially to the New World and the
Ottoman Empire, and their role in the history of science and scientific
knowledge (Ulisse Aldrovandi and Ferdinando Cospi); as well as the
writing of artistic traditions and the so-called Bolognese School of
Painting. How does the city space and the civic cultures embodied
within it participate in connecting the local with the universal? How
can shifting notions of university/universality and diversity be
described and analyzed within the interplay of individuals and groups
that together make up the experience of the city?

The KHI Summer School invites applications from the fields of Art
History and related disciplines, from graduate students, doctoral
candidates and scholars who are embarking on post-doctoral research.
The number of participants is restricted to fifteen. Each participant
is expected to contribute to the success of the course not only with a
presentation, but also by actively engaging in the discussions. To
allow for active participation in the discussion, good passive
knowledge of Italian and German is required. The Institute will bear
the cost of accommodation and will reimburse half of the incurred
travelling expenses; in addition, participants will receive a daily
allowance.

Applications should include: a letter of interest comprising a research
statement, a one-page Curriculum vitae and a presentation proposal (ca.
300 words). These materials can be written in English, Italian or
German.

Please send your documents by 1 May 2017 in a single PDF file (max. 2
MB), referencing ‘Studienkurs 2017’, to the attention of Prof. Dr.
Gerhard Wolf (dirwolf@khi.fi.it).

Concept and organization: Annette Hoffmann, Marco Musillo, Jessica N.
Richardson and Gerhard Wolf

Announcement: Society for the Study of the Church Interior

S.-Maria-gloriosa-dei-Frari-Title-page-1500-500.jpgWhat is the study of the church interior?

The church was a highly meaningful site for pre-Modern European society. As architectural sites accessible to all strata of society, church buildings provided contexts for interaction between social classes and genders, and settings for a wide variety of religious and non-religious activities. From an art-historical perspective, the vast majority of artworks produced in the medieval and Renaissance periods was intended for the many chapels, altars and screens in the church interior.

Yet, despite the obvious importance of these sites, the spatial dispositions of church interiors – and how they evolved over time – are still little-understood. Centuries of restorations and adaptations have radically transformed the appearance and usage of church interiors: screens have been removed; altars shifted position; new liturgical furnishings installed; fresco decoration whitewashed; and seating added or taken away.

Scholars studying the church interior seek to reconstruct the meaning, functions and visual appeal of these sacred spaces. The Society for the Study of the Church Interior seeks to promote this holistic and interdisciplinary approach to researching historic church buildings.

Who are we?

We are a group of scholars who are interested in the material culture, spatial dynamics and multifarious functions of the church interior in the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. We are mainly based in the US, Germany, Italy and the UK, but welcome members from around the world.

Primarily focused on pre-Modern Italy, we are interested in reconstructing aspects of individual churches, but also in broader issues associated with large-scale changes to architectural layouts generally associated with religious reform. In addition to purely art-historical inquiry, we investigate the religious, political or practical motivations behind transformation campaigns and the effects such changes had on the use of church buildings.

What do we do?

Studying the church interior presents complex challenges for the historian, given that documentary, archaeological and material sources can be fragmentary or even contradictory. Our research involves the analysis of several types of primary and secondary source material, which may include:

  • Original archival documentation such as payments, contracts, testaments, etc
  • Liturgical texts
  • Official records of Visitations conducted by bishops and other clergy
  • Historic ground plans
  • Antiquarian guidebooks
  • Modern restoration records
  • Material evidence of surviving architecture
  • Archaeological reports
  • Provenance of objects such as altarpieces and liturgical furnishings

What are the activities of the Society?

The Society promotes broader engagement with the study of the church interior, disseminates research findings and fosters an academic community of like-minded scholars.

In the future, we hope to organize sessions and meetings at major conferences such as the Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting.

We are also in the process of establishing an online, collaborative database to collect data on the church interior. Initially concentrating on Italy, where the impact of the Counter Reformation was particularly strong, the database will reveal the broad patterns and chronologies which are currently beyond the grasp of the individual researcher. Members of the Society who wish to contribute to the database will receive a login to access it: please email Joanne or Michael if you are interested.

Sign up for the mailing list here.

CFP: Various Sessions @Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, May 11 – 14, 2017

Call for Papers: Various Sessions @Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, May 11 – 14, 2017
Deadline: Sep 15, 2016

Reminder:
The Stones Cry Out: Modes of Citation in Medieval Architecture
Light and Darkness in Medieval Art, 1200-1450. ICMA sponsored

session

Other Sessions:

Obscured by the Alps: Medieval Italian Architecture and the
European Canon
800px-cathedrale_de_sienne_28duomo_di_siena29Organizer: Erik Gustafson (edg218@nyu.edu)

The traditional canon of European architecture has been well established through both formal-stylistic aesthetics and periodized criteria, rooted ultimately in Hegelian notions of the underlying spirit of an age and Modern nationalist identities. Viewed from northern Europe, the canon’s trajectory moves fluidly from the halcyon
days of Greece and Rome to the stunted but ambitious Early Christian and Byzantine era, developing into the solidly reliable Romanesque
until the revolution of the transcendent Gothic is decapitated by the Renaissance counter-revolution and its florescent Baroque iteration, to
be overshadowed by the enlightened and reasoned Neoclassical age,
leading to the search for identity of the 19th century Historicist
styles and the return to the classically pure clarity of Modernism.
The contributions of the Italian peninsula are periodic, and are
generally defined within the canon by returns to classicism.  In recent
decades, architectural historians have begun to challenge the Italian
canon, expanding its geographic scope from the old Rome-Florence-Venice
vector while also undermining chronological waypoints such as the
Medieval-Renaissance divide.  The canon, however, remains infrangible,
still underwritten by the formalist priorities established at its
inception.

This session seeks to examine the utility of the European canon in
assessing the historical significance of Italian medieval architecture.
Is there more to Italian architectural history than recurrent bouts of
classicism?  How can Italian architecture be understood positively
within the European context, rather than in opposition or subjection to
the canonical narratives?  Possible avenues of inquiry might include
exploring the historiographical lacunae of the canon, considering
alternative criteria for structuring new canonical narratives,
examining socio-cultural phenomena otherwise elided by the canon, or
investigating other historically contingent trends which reflect
different scholarly treatments of Italy and the north.  Medieval
architectural history has been “rethought” several times in the past
decade, bringing “new approaches” to old questions.  Shifting the
discussion, this session seeks papers that ask broad new questions
about medieval architecture’s place in the history of European culture,
grounding such investigations in local Italian contexts. While Italy
has long been obscured by the Alps, this session seeks to begin new
conversations about medieval architecture driven by Italian challenges
to canonical understandings.

How to Submit: Please submit a paper proposal to the organizer, Erik Gustafson
(edg218@nyu.edu)
Deadline: September 15, 2016
Please include the following materials in your application:
1) A one-page abstract
2) Completed Participant Information Form available at the website of
the Medieval Congress:
http://wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions
3) A one-page CV

tumblr_m2du3bavab1qkpbfc1The Matter of Ornament
Organizer: Ashley Jones, University of Florida

Ornament has long occupied a troubled position in the history of
western art. Subject to rising and falling fashions, it has been beset
from all sides. Derided as feminine and dismissed as superficial,
ornament has been defined against both classical and modern
austerities. Medieval ornament, like so much of medieval art, has acted
as foil in the grand narratives of the rise and fall of figuration and
abstraction. But broader trends in the history of art and material
culture have, in recent years, highlighted the role medieval objects,
with their simultaneously heightened physicality and spirituality, can
play in illuminating profound questions of the nature of matter and
representation. This panel seeks to add ornament – arguably a
fundamental mode of premodern abstraction – to that equation. It
invites papers drawn from both material and textual traditions that
investigate the intersections of materiality, representationality, and
ornamentality in medieval material culture. Possible topics include but
are not limited to questions of the way in which matter gives rise to
ornament; the way in which matter, such as sacred relics, is made
legible through ornamentation; and the ways in which medieval ornament
evokes both the matter of nature and the matter of the cosmos.

How to Submit:  Paper proposals should consist of the following:
– Abstract of proposed paper (no more than 350 words)
– Completed Participant Information Form – available on the conference
website here:
https://wmich.edu/sites/default/files/attachments/u434/2016/medieval-pif-2017.pdf
– CV with contact information.
ALL PROPOSALS AND INQUIRIES SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO:
Ashley Jones (ajones@arts.ufl.edu)

0cf1189eec15ef93a0058320d627e312The Schematization of time
This session proposes to investigate visual strategies used in
time-reckoning and calendar constructions. Medieval illustrations of
scientific works, computus treatises (including Bede’s De temporum
ratione), historical chronicles, almanacs and moral and theological
tracts, display a vast spectrum of images dealing with the natural and
divine causes of time phenomena, their manifestations, their various
effects on the world and their universal significations. These images
testify to a wide range of subjects and interests, from cosmological
and astronomical explanations, to practical considerations regarding
liturgy, astrology, medicine, divination, prognostication, to history
and geography, to practical and speculative mathematics, and to
symbolic devices working as visual exegesis of the creation. Given the
rich corpus of source material, how might the visualization of time
through schematization and volvelles help us understand the role of
time in medieval life and culture? How did schemata and diagrams
represent specific strategies of knowledge transmission through
geometrical relationships, color systems, and numerical and spatial
representations? Although modern medieval studies witness an increasing
interest in schemata and diagrams, the omnipresence and diversity of
visual reflexions on time in the Middle Ages contrasts with the small
number of case studies dedicated to the subject.

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the
visualization of relationships between time, space and matter; the
schmatization of time in medical theory and practice; the depiction of
liturgical time; the correlation between time-reckoning and celestial
phenomena, either astronomical or astrological; the calculation of past
and future dates through images concerning chronology and eschatology.

How to Apply: The panel features 15-20 minutes papers. Please send an abstract (150
to 350 words), a short CV and completed Participant Information Form to
Arthur Hénaff (arthur.henaff@etu.ephe.fr) and Sarah Griffin
(sarah.griffin@kellogg.ox.ac.uk) by September 15, 2016