Tag Archives: Reformation

Last conference places: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650

quadfromgateConference: Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650, residential conference at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 6-9 September 2017
Register by 3 September

Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded on humanistic principles in 1517.  Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and Hebrew.  Throughout the long sixteenth century, Corpus was a major centre of learning and religion: it played host to the Spanish humanist, Juan Luis Vives and the German astronomer and mathematician, Nicholas Kratzer; its fellows included the Catholic reformer Reginald Pole and the Protestant thinkers John Jewel and Richard Hooker; it played a prominent part in the production of the King James Bible.  In the College’s 500th anniversary year, we are holding a conference to discuss the wider context and implications of this remarkable foundation, exploring the inter-connected worlds of learning and education, prelacy and public service, charity and communal life, religion, literature and the arts, in Oxford and beyond, during a two hundred-year period of Renaissance and Reformation.

The programme includes papers from Susan Brigden, Clive Burgess, Jeremy Catto, Paul Cavill, Alexandra Gajda, Anthony Grafton, Lucy Kaufman, Nicholas Hardy, Pamela King, Julian Reid, Richard Rex, Miri Rubin, David Rundle, Christopher Stray, Joanna Weinberg, Magnus Williamson, and William Whyte.  A round table of Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Heal and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by Keith Thomas, will bring proceedings to a close.

Details are available here: Conference Programme.

Booking is now open: please click here Renaissance College Conference.

If you have any questions about your booking, please feel free to contact kerry.atkinson@ccc.ox.ac.uk.  For any queries about the content of the conference, please contact john.watts@ccc.ox.ac.uk.

 

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Examining Becket

Reflections on the Thomas Becket Study Day, 7th June 2017, Canterbury Cathedral

There could scarcely be a more appropriate setting for a study day on the theme of Thomas Becket than Canterbury Cathedral, the location of the archbishop’s martyrdom nearly 850 years ago on the 29th December 1170. In the Cathedral Library and Archives, just metres from the site of Becket’s murder in the North West Transept, experts from universities, museums and Canterbury heritage organisations gathered to discuss the saint’s life and cult.

The day began with a series of ‘quick fire’ presentations, each focusing on one theme or object related to Thomas Becket. The range of material gave an immediate sense of the scale and popularity of Becket’s cult in the Middle Ages and beyond. Some objects discussed have likely existed in the vicinity of Canterbury since they were produced, including a fragmentary sandstone ampulla mould discovered in the garden of 16 Watling Street (Dr Paul Bennett, Canterbury Archaeological Trust), a thirteenth-century cartulary made for Christ Church containing charters for the shrine of Thomas Becket (Professor Louise Wilkinson, Canterbury Christ Church University), the seal of Archbishop Simon Sudbury showing Becket’s martyrdom (Dr Sheila Sweetinburgh, University of Kent), and the spectacular miracle windows in the Trinity Chapel of the Cathedral itself (Professor Michael A. Michael, Christie’s Education).

Thomas Becket ampulla (or vessel), now in the British Museum, similar to the kind that would have been produced by the Watling Street mould discussed by Dr Paul Bennet. See more 3D models of pilgrim souvenirs here

Image 2, Sens Chasuble

Chasuble in Sens Cathedral treasury thought to have been worn by Thomas Becket and venerated as a contact relic

Other delegates discussed geographically dispersed objects which originated or were believed to have originated in Canterbury. For instance, pilgrim souvenirs depicting Becket were bought by visitors to Canterbury and, it would seem, lost on the way home. These badges, with their intricate and compelling imagery, would have been worn on the bags, hats and garments of pilgrims as signs of their visit to Becket’s shrine and are now excavated from sites across Britain and Europe (Amy Jeffs and Dr Gabriel Byng, University of Cambridge and convenors of The Digital Pilgrim Project). Likewise, Dr Emily Guerry (University of Kent) discussed a series of vestments owned by Sens Cathedral that were reputedly worn by Becket and possibly used at Sens as contact relics.

 

A number of  significant objects pertaining to Becket originated from further afield, both geographically and chronologically. Dr Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art), for example, presented on a c. 1200 altar frontal depicting Becket’s martyrdom found in the church of San Miguel in Almazán, which bears early witness to the popularity of Becket’s cult in Spain.

Image 1, San Miguel altar

Altar frontal from the church of San Miguel in Almazán, showing Becket’s martyrdom

Becket’s later legacy was then examined. Lloyd De Beer (British Museum) assessed the sixteenth-century political and religious connotations of the saint’s martyrdom through the lens of Alberti’s The Martyr’s Picture (1581), displayed in the Venerable English College in Rome, and Naomi Speakman (British Museum) discussed Becket’s memory in post-Reformation England and his representation as an anti-martyr.

These evocative objects and themes provoked a lively concluding discussion that centred on the international nature of Becket’s cult and the extent to which the art associated with it imitated and/or innovated in order promote the saint and potency of his cult as a political tool.

Image 4, Cathedral Archives

Examining the Professions of Obedience in the Canterbury Cathedral Archives

This discussion was followed by an opportunity to see first-hand some of the extraordinary items associated with Becket. Cressida Williams, head of the Cathedral Archives and Library, had organised for an array of Becket-themed documents and objects from the Cathedral collections and various heritage organisations in Canterbury to be displayed together in the reading room of the Cathedral Archives. Among this impressive collection were two fragments of pink Tournai marble, discovered during excavations in the Cathedral grounds, which are thought to have come from the shrine of St Thomas himself. Also on display were a number of medieval seals from the Cathedral’s collections, including those of Archbishops Hubert Walter and Stephen Langton, which both depict Becket’s martyrdom. Dr Helen Gittos from the University of Kent discussed a particular treasure of the Cathedral Archive, the Professions of Obedience, a series of 170 documents now bound into a single volume that record the vows made by bishops during their consecration. These small vellum statements, which would have originally been sewn together in a continuous roll, contain the dates of bishops’ consecrations, and are thus immensely helpful in dating other contemporary documents based on a comparison of their palaeography. Becket’s entry is especially marked in the Professions by a statement in red noting his archiepiscopal status.

 

The later half of the afternoon saw the group move to the Cathedral stained glass studio, where Leonie Seliger, Head of the Stained Glass Conservation Department, led us in a discussion of the representation of Becket in the Cathedral glass. Notably, only three original thirteenth-century panels depicting Becket’s head survive, which Leonie encouraged us to find among her printed reproductions – a task that proved surprisingly difficult. We also had the opportunity to see some of medieval stained glass currently under restoration in the studio, and to hear from Leonie about the techniques that would have gone in to making these panels. A particular highlight was seeing how the colour of nine hundred year old stained glass was still bright and vivid when held up to the light.

Image 7, Sudbury's tomb

Kneeling at the resonant prayer niches in Archbishop Sudbury’s tomb, Canterbury Cathedral

A subsequent tour of the Cathedral offered a chance to see the miracle windows we had discussed in the glass studio in situ, along with the site of Becket’s shrine and several archiepiscopal and royal tombs. The tombs of Archbishops Sudbury and Mepham in the south aisle of the Choir afforded a particularly interactive experience; kneeling down at one of the vaulted prayer niches carved into the tombs’ exterior, penitents (or indeed academics) can experience an amplification not only of the music performed in the nearby Choir, but also their own whispered prayers and thoughts.

 

Professor Paul Binski (University of Cambridge) brought the study day to a close with a public lecture entitled ‘Thomas Becket and the Medieval Cult of Personality’. Drawing on many of the objects seen and discussed throughout the day, Professor Binski reflected on the idea of Becket’s ‘persona’ (as opposed to the modern notion of ‘personality’) and its importance in the formation and development of his cult. Much like a mask that can be put on or taken off, the medieval concept of an individual’s persona was related to their outer countenance, and formed by certain archetypal characteristics – both good and bad – often rooted in character types in biblical stories or saint’s lives. Becket’s persona and outer image, Professor Binski argued, was imitated in the art and architecture produced in response to his martyrdom, an aspect that was vital to the rapid dissemination and spread of the cult. Due in part to the accessibility of this image through objects made both for the elite and for the ordinary person, Becket’s persona transcended social as well as geographical boundaries, transforming his cult into a widespread, international phenomenon. Professor Binski’s concluding remarks on the appeal of the Becket’s cult in the Middle Ages had a particular resonance amidst of the full lecture theatre where the lasting legacy of Thomas Becket’s life and death was still very much felt.

Sophie Kelly

PhD Candidate, University of Kent

 

Job: Research Associate / Post doc @ SACRIMA, LMU Munich

Institut für Kunstgeschichte, LMU München, February 1, 2017 – January
31, 2019
Application deadline: Dec 1, 2016

Jobs @ SACRIMA, The Normativity of Sacred Images in Early Modern
Europe, an interdisciplinary ERC funded project at the Institute for
Art History of the LMU in Munich
01.12.2016 um 00:00 Uhr

Research Associates / Post doc
Einrichtung: Fakultät für Geschichts- und Kunstwissenschaften
(Institut für Kunstgeschichte)
Besetzungsdatum: 01.02.2017
Ende der Bewerbungsfrist: 01.12.2016
Entgeltgruppe: 13 TV-L
Befristung: 2 Jahre

Es besteht grundsätzlich die Möglichkeit der Teilzeitbeschäftigung.

Die Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) ist eine der
renommiertesten und größten Universitäten Deutschlands.

Aufgaben

Applications are sought for up to two Research Associates
(Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter/in) on the new ERC funded project
SACRIMA, The Normativity of Sacred Images in Early Modern Europe led by
Professor Chiara Franceschini and based at the LMU Institute for Art
History. Applications from other disciplines are welcome.

We offer one to two post-doctoral positions of 2 years starting at the
earliest in February 2017. After a positive evaluation, each of the
contracts can be extended for one more year (a total of three years
maximum). The starting salary is in accordance with the requirements of
the LMU and depends on relevant research experience.

The project will study the normativity and the autonomy of art in
particular in the religious field in Early Modern Europe (circa
1450-1650). Bringing together researchers trained in the history of art
of different European areas as well as historians of religion, law and
cultural transfer, this interdisciplinary project will break ground in
two main ways. First, by questioning and developing the notion of
‘visual norm’ in a double sense: institutional norms imposed on images
and autonomous visual norms. Second, by adopting a comparative approach
at the crossroads of the history of art, the history of religion and
law, and cultural geography.

Focusing on a comparison between five major areas that, remaining
inside Catholicism, responded differently to the challenge imposed by
the Reformation, the project has the following stated objectives: 1) A
comparative survey of cases of contested images in the Italian
peninsula and islands, France, Iberia, the Low Countries and Southern
Germany. 2) An investigation of the notion of ‘visual norm’ (focusing
on aspects such as styles, iconographies, reproduction and reframing)
and a study of the status, the autonomy and the legal value of images.
3) An exploration of the geography of reactions to art transfer aiming
at reconstructing a cross-border cartography of visual norms in Europe
and the Mediterranean.

Anforderungen

You will have either a PhD in History of Art or in Early Modern History
and allied disciplines. You will have a background in areas of the
History of Art of the early modern period, preferably with a
specialization in Northern European and/or Iberian art (or in one of
the other areas of interests of the project), and/or in the early
modern religious history of Europe.

You will be expected to pursue independent work related to the themes
of SACRIMA focusing in particular on objectives 1 and 2 of the project
(see description above). The successful candidates are expected to work
as part of a team based in Munich and to spend up to four months in
each of the years of research on fieldwork and/or archive visits for
the case studies. They will publish the results of their research
within the publication programme of the project. You will be expected
to be involved in planning and running collaborative activities of the
project group (project meetings and seminars) as well as in some
administrative work associated with the project.
Experience with administration and coordination would be desirable as
well as an interest in archival research and/or the implementation of
digital tools connected with the project.

Working space, working tools and a travel budget will be provided.
Applications by researchers with handicap will be considered with
priority under equal conditions. We welcome applications from female
candidates. This is a full-time position. The possibility of part-time
and flexible working hours will be considered.

Wir bieten Ihnen eine interessante und verantwortungsvolle Tätigkeit
mit guten Weiterbildungs- und Entwicklungsmöglichkeiten.
Schwerbehinderte Bewerber / Bewerberinnen werden bei ansonsten im
Wesentlichen gleicher Eignung bevorzugt. Die Bewerbung von Frauen wird
begrüßt.
Bewerbungsadresse

How to apply:

Please send the following application materials as a single
PDF-document to Chiara.Franceschini@lmu.de (please specify SACRIMA in
your email subject line):
1. Short cover letter;
2. Short CV, including list of publications;
3. A description of your proposed research topic during the 2-year post
relating to the stated objectives of the SACRIMA project (max 1300
words, excluding bibliography);
4. A writing sample (e.g. one chapter of your latest paper or
publication). The writing sample should reflect your current research
interests; it does not need to have been already accepted for
publication and should preferably be no longer than 8000 words;
5. Names and contacts of at least two referees.

Applications received by December 1, 2016 will receive full
consideration. Review of the applications will continue until suitable
candidates are found. Shortlisted candidates will be invited for
interviews in mid December. Informal discussions with long-listed
candidates might be held via Skype on 6-7 December 2016. Informal
enquiries may be made to Prof. Dr. Chiara Franceschini.
Ansprechpartner/in

Prof. Dr. Chiara Franceschini
SACRIMA – The Normativity of Sacred Images in Early Modern Europe (ERC)
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Zentnerstraße 31
80798 München
Telefon: +49 (0)89 2180 3501 / Fax: +49 (089) / 2180-13507
E-Mail: Chiara.Franceschini@lmu.de

http://www.kunstgeschichte.uni-muenchen.de/aktuelles/franceschini-ausschreibung/index.html

New Publications: The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch

hmsah_77The Epiphany of Hieronymus Bosch: Imagining Antichrist and Others from the Middle Ages to the Reformation

Author: D.H. Strickland

Brepols Publishers

This study examines medieval Christian views of non-Christians and their changing political and theological significance as revealed in late-medieval and early-modern visual culture. Taking as her point of departure Hieronymus Bosch’s famous Epiphany triptych housed in the Prado Museum in Madrid, the author analyzes how representations of Jews, Saracens (later Turks), ‘Ethiopians’, and Mongols for centuries shaped western Christian attitudes towards salvation history, contemporary political conflicts, and the declining status of the Roman Church. She argues that Bosch’s innovative pictorial warning of the coming of Antichrist and the threat posed by non-Christians gained its power and authority through inter-visual references to the medieval past. Before and after Bosch, imaginative constructions that identified Jews and Turks with Gog and Magog, or the Pope with Antichrist, drew upon a long-established range of artistic and rhetorical strategies that artists and authors reconfigured as changing political circumstances demanded. Painted at a pivotal moment on the eve of the Reformation, the Prado Epiphany is a compelling lens through which to look backwards to the Middle Ages, and forwards to Martin Luther and the ideological significance of escalating Christian/non-Christian conflicts in the formation of the new Protestant church.

Conference: Religion, Art and Conflict: Disputes, destruction and creation (Courtauld Institute, 5-6 December 2014)

15thc_angel_000[1]Although not a medieval conference per se, we think our readers will enjoy these two days on Religion, Art and Conflict at the Courtauld Institute in December, with sessions on manuscripts, historiographical reception of medieval art, and more besides.

Tickets (£26, £16 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions) can be ordered here.

Throughout history religion and belief have been the catalyst for the creation of great buildings and works of art. However, religious art has frequently been disputed, despised and destroyed. Members are sought for a research group that will examine the role of reform, ideology and conflict in the destruction and preservation of religious art and architecture. The group will also investigate how theological disputes and religious conflicts have been the impetus for new intellectual and creative approaches to the visual and material arts.

The papers presented at the conference will cover 600 years of art history, from fifteenth-century Florence to depictions of Islam after 9/11, and a breadth of topics from medieval monasticism to William Blake’s theology of art, from Bhutanese seventeenth century art to the Vatican’s relationship with contemporary art, and much more.

Friday, 5 December
13.30 – 14.00 Registration

14.00 – 14.05 Introduction and Welcome

14.05 – 15.30 Session 1: Cultural Interaction or Conflict?

María Molina Fajardo (University of Granada): Building a ‘Catholic Site’: Spaces of Encounter, the Aggression and the Creation of the Village of Nigüelas (Granada) after
the Castilian Conquest

Ariana Maki (University of Colorado Boulder): Lines and Lineages: Depicting History and Religion in 17th-Century Bhutan

David Low (The Courtauld Institute of Art): The Ruins of Ani: the Rediscovery, Destruction and Reconstruction of an Armenian City

15.30 – 16.00 COFFEE/TEA BREAK (tea /coffee provided)

16.00 – 17.00 Session 2: Word, Image and Conflict – Liturgical Books in Late Medieval and
Reformation-era England

Jayne Wackett (University of Kent): Liturgical Images in the English Reformation:
Lost, Found and Altered

Michael Carter (The Courtauld Institute of Art): Tuppence Worth: an Annotated Missal
from a Cistercian Abbey

17.00 – 17.15 COMFORT BREAK

17.15 – 18.15 Keynote Lecture: James Carley (York University, Toronto / University of Kent): ‘So myserably peryshed in the spoyle’: John Leland and John Bale on the Dissolution of the English Religious Houses

18.15 – 18.30 Summary and discussion

18.30 RECEPTION

Saturday, 6 December

09.30 – 10.00 Registration

10.00 – 11.30 Session 3: Violence, Destruction and Creation in Renaissance and Counter-
Reformation Italy

Scott Nethersole (The Courtauld Institute of Art): ‘Art came to an end’: Making and Destruction in Fra Filippo Lippi’s Medici Altarpiece

Anna Marazuela Kim (University of Virginia): Idols of Art and of the Mind: Sculptural and Spiritual Iconoclasm in Michelangelo’s Rondanini Pietà

Eva Papoulia (The Courtauld Institute of Art): The Cappella Gregoriana in St. Peter’s: a Catholic Response to Protestant Claims

11.30 – 12.00 COFFEE/TEA BREAK (tea /coffee provided)

12.00 – 13.00 Keynote Lecture:
Sussan Babaie (The Courtauld Institute of Art): ‘Holy’ Wars and the Visual Poetics of
Innocence; Iran-Iraq, then (1980-89)

13.00 – 14.00 BREAK FOR LUNCH (not provided, except for speakers)

14.00 – 15.30 Session 4: Religion, Conflict and Identity
Lloyd De Beer (The British Museum / University of East Anglia): Burial and Belief:
Alabaster Sculpture in Context

Ágnes Kriza (University of Cambridge): Representing Destruction: Medieval Russian
Visualisations of Byzantine Iconoclasm

Emily Pegues (The Courtauld Institute of Art / National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.): To die for an ideal’: Three Wars, One Retable and the Foundations of a Belgian History of Art

15.30 – 16.00 COFFEE/TEA BREAK (tea /coffee provided)

16.00 – 17.30 Session 5: Religion, Art and Conflict in the Modern and Contemporary World

Naomi Billingsley (University of Manchester): Knock, Knock, William Blake’s Here: Creative Conflict in Blake’s Illustrations of Edward Young’s Night Thoughts

Anna Messner (University of Munich): In Search of Jewish Art and Identity: The Munich Artist Rudolf Ernst (1896-1942)

Lieke Wijnia (Tilburg University): Religion’s Reclaim of Contemporary Art: The Vatican
at the 2013 Venice Biennale

17.30 – 17.45 Concluding comments and discussion

17.45 END

Visit here for further information and abstracts of the papers.