Tag Archives: Leeds

TODAY: Leeds IMC, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland, Session 703

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland will be running its first conference session this year at the Leeds International Medieval Congress.

Session 703 – Tuesday 4 July 2017 – 14.15 to 15.45

The following papers will be delivered:

Ron Baxter (Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture and the Medieval Workshop (paper 703-a);

James King (The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Romanesque Sculpture of Dunfermline Abbey and Its Influence: Evidence and Some Questions (paper 703-b);

Agata Gomółka (Department of Art History & World Art Studies, University of East Anglia) – Carving Romanesque Bodies (paper 703-a).

Abtstract

Romanesque art and architecture was transnational in a European context.
The architectural sculpture produced in the British Isles and Ireland during the late
11th and 12th centuries demonstrates the visceral connection between these off-
shore islands and mainland Europe at that time. In its inaugural session at the IMC,
the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI) is seen to reveal
some of the ways in which its searchable and fully illustrated database enables art
historians to build an understanding of Romanesque stone carving by identifying
authorship, tracing the diffusion of carved ornament, recreating workshop practice,
and reimagining aesthetic criteria. Launched in 1987 by Professor George Zarnecki
with British Academy support and now affiliated also to King’s College London, the
CRSBI is an Open Access website comprising illustrated records of the Romanesque
sculpture at some five thousand sites in Britain and Ireland.

CFP: Horses in Art: The Familiar and the Alien Session at the International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 4 July 2017: 11.15-12.45

Gentile da Fabriano, 15c, detail

Gentile da Fabriano, 15c, detail

IMC 2017: Last minute call for papers

Below is a list of two-paper sessions which still require a third paper.If you would like to propose a paper for any of the sessions please send your paper to us via email noting the session you have applied for at the top of your message. If we have included contact details for the organiser, please contact them first to discuss your paper.

Session 603

Horses in Art: The Familiar and the Alien

Tuesday 4 July 2017: 11.15-12.45

Organiser: Edgar Rops, Faculty of Law, University of Latvia, Riga

Moderator: Anastasija Ropa, Department of Management & Communication Science, LASE, Riga (Anastasija.Ropa@lspa.lv)

Horses, omnipresent in the medieval life, make a frequent appearance in medieval art in a variety of forms and guises, referring the viewer to the familiar realities or carrying him or her to the realms of fantasy and alterity. Likewise, the connotations of equines and equestrians differs: from the metaphoric and symbolic to the purely practical, the interaction between horses and humans in visual media channels a variety of meanings. The papers presented in this thematic session on horses in medieval art study the representation of equines in various physical contexts: on tapestries and frescoes, as well as manuscripts.

 

For other sessions still seeking papers at IMC Leeds 2017, see the conference website.

CFP: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017

logomaneyCall for Papers: BAA Sessions at the IMC, Leeds, July 3 rd -6 th 2017
Deadline: Friday 23 rd September

After a successful outing to the Leeds IMC this summer where the BAA hosted two sessions, the BAA welcomes proposals for further BAA organised sessions next year (July 3 rd -6 th 2017). The IMC’s research theme for 2017 is “Otherness” which I think could be interpreted very successfully by the BAA’s members and relate well to research incorporating material culture.
“Other” could refer to those who are deemed to be other in society (strangers, foreigners, monsters); objects that are unusual, or out of the norm, and could therefore be considered as ‘other’; case studies that do not conform to type; and even topics concerning what is culturally “other” (such as artistic, architectural, and literature styles).
Approaches to this topic could include how “other” is encountered and responded to, or how ‘other’ can be defined and identified.

Suggested topics from the IMC include:
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
Full details of the IMC and their interpretation of ‘other’ and other topic suggestions can be found here:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/info/125137/international_medieval_congress

It is hoped that the BAA can organise several sessions once again, with similar papers grouped together (either methodologically or by subject). Therefore if you do have any ideas about colleagues whose research would complement your own paper, please do include such comments along with your paper’s proposal.

How to Submit: Proposals should consist of a title, and short abstract (50-150 words). Please send paper proposals to hpmahood@gmail.com by Friday 23 rd September. If you have any questions, please do get in touch.

CFP: Special thematic strand: ‘Otherness,’ IMC Leeds 2017

imc_postcard_2017_front_1Call for Papers: Special thematic strand: ‘Otherness,’ International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 3–6 July 2017
Deadline for paper proposals: 31 August 2016.
Deadline for session proposals:
30 September 2016

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome.

However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2017 – is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch.

‘Others’ can be found everywhere: outside one’s own community (from foreigners to non-human monsters) and inside it (for example, religious and social minorities, or individual newcomers in towns, villages, or at court).

One could encounter the ‘Others’ while travelling, in writing, reading and thinking about them, by assessing and judging them, by ‘feelings’ ranging from curiosity to contempt, and behaviour towards them which, in turn, can lead to integration or exclusion, friendship or hostility, and support or persecution.

The demarcation of the ‘Self’ from ‘Others’ applies to all areas of life, to concepts of thinking and mentalité as well as to social ‘reality’, social intercourse and transmission of knowledge and opinions. Forms and concepts of the ‘Other’, and attitudes towards ‘Others’, imply and reveal concepts of ‘Self’, self-awareness and identity, whether expressed explicitly or implicitly. There is no ‘Other’ without ‘Self’. A classification as ‘Others’ results from a comparison with oneself and one’s own identity groups.

Thus, attitudes towards ‘Others’ oscillate between admiring and detesting, and invite questioning into when the ‘Other’ becomes the ‘Strange’.

The aim of the IMC is to cover the entire spectrum of ‘Otherness’ through multi-disciplinary approaches, on a geographical, ethnic, political, social, legal, intellectual and even personal level, to analyse sources from all genres, areas, and regions.

Possible entities to research for ‘Otherness’ could include (but are not limited to):
•       Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems

  • Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
    •       Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
    •       The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’.
    •       Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
    •       Otherness related to art, musics, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
    •       Any further specific determinations of ‘alterity’

Methodologies and Approaches to ‘Otherness’ (not necessarily distinct, but overlapping) could include:
•       Definitions, concepts, and constructions of ‘Otherness’
•       Indicators of, criteria and reasons for demarcation
•       Relation(s) between ‘Otherness’ and concepts of ‘Self’
•       Communication, encounters, and social intercourse with ‘Others’ (in embassies, travels, writings, quarrels, conflicts, and persecution)

  • Knowledge, perception, and assessment of the ‘Others’
    •       Attitudes and behaviour towards ‘Others’
    •       Deviation from any ‘norms’ of life and thought (from the superficial to the fundamental)
    •       Gender and transgender perspectives
    •       Co-existence and segregation
    •       Methodological problems when inquiring into ‘Otherness’
    •       The Middle Ages as the ‘Other’ compared with contemporary times (‘Othering’ the Middle Ages).

    How to Submit: The IMC online proposal form is now available.
    Proposals should be submitted online at: www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2017_call.html
    The IMC welcomes session and paper proposals submitted in all major European languages.

CFP: Other Spaces: Gender and Architecture in the Imagination, @IMC 2017, Leeds, July 3-6

haremason3Call for Papers: Other Spaces: Gender and Architecture in the Imagination, International Medieval Congress at University of Leeds (IMC 2017), July 3-6, 2017
Deadline: September 12, 2016

Paper Panel sponsored by the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS)

Recent scholarship has drawn attention to the significant roles played by medieval women as patrons of architecture and to the ways in which gender informed the design and function of architectural sites. But what about representations of women and architecture in the medieval imagination? How do visual materials such as manuscript illuminations, paintings and tapestries, and literary works, such as dream visions, conceptualize the relationship between women and architectural space? To what degree are gender and architecture mutually constituted? What conclusions can we draw about spaces considered feminine, and how do these spaces renegotiate the divisions between private and public? Given the longstanding associations between the female body and enclosure, what is the relationship between gender roles and real or imagined enclosures? In what ways do gendered imagined spaces help reconceive real spaces, or vice versa?

Though all topics will be considered, we are particularly eager for papers that address female identity and agency as figured through architectural forms.

How to submit: Please send your name and affiliation, a paper title and abstract (200-250 words) to Boyda Johnstone (bjohnstone1@fordham.edu) & Alexandra Verini (averini@ucla.edu) by Sept. 12, 2016.