Tag Archives: Manuscript

CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

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CFP: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018

michelino_molinari_da_besozzo_-_st-_luke_painting_the_virgin_-_google_art_projectCall for Papers: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018
Deadline: 20 September 2017

The multimedia fluidity of artists and artisans in the later Middle Ages is an area ripe for investigation. Across diverse regions in Europe and beyond, many illuminators, both named and anonymous, engaged in forms of art-making in addition to the decoration of manuscript books. Some painted frescoes, panels, and ephemera, while others provided designs and supervised the production of stained glass, enamels, tapestries, and other objects. With some frequency, those who specialized in other media were in turn called upon to illuminate books. While modern studies have focused on individual examples of such multi-media talent, the broader implications of this intermedial fluency remain obscure: within the wider art-historical canon, manuscript illumination as an art form is largely seen as derivative or prone to influence from large-scale media.
This session seeks to re-examine the relationship between manuscript illumination and other fields of artistic endeavor in the later Middle Ages. How did artists themselves consider the differing characteristics and ontologies of these varied supports? How did painters adapt their style and working method when engaging with other media and other categories of object? Did the presence of local guild regulations curtail or encourage multi-media practice, and how did this compare region-to-region or to contexts outside of Western Europe? Beyond evident differences in scale, pricing, and technique, interesting issues arise regarding patronage and audience: how different was the clientele for manuscripts compared to that for painting, for example? How did the relative accessibility and visibility of differing art forms affect the visual solutions achieved? Is a book-bound image “freer” or more experimental than a publically visible one?
The session asks these and other questions relevant to those studying the social contexts of art production, the dynamics of reception, materiality, and the technical characteristics of objects. It seeks to be open-minded in terms of methodological approach, and aims to bring together scholars working on diverse material, in order to initiate a larger conversation that can impact the discipline of art history as a whole.
Please send proposals with a one-page abstract and a completed Participant Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to Nicholas Herman (hermanni@upenn.edu) by 20 September 2017.

Internship in Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts

Thanks to external funding, the British Library is pleased to be able to offer an internship in the Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts section of the Western Heritage Department, for doctoral and post-doctoral students in History, Art History, Medieval Language or Literature or another relevant subject.

Large zoo-anthropomorphic initial from the Historia naturalis of Pliny the Elder, Arundel MS 98, f. 85v

Large zoo-anthropomorphic initial from the Historia naturalis of Pliny the Elder, Arundel MS 98, f. 85v

The focus of the internship will be to enhance our Explore Archives and Manuscripts online catalogue, by creating or enriching catalogue entries for medieval manuscripts and publicising them in blog posts and other interpretative material. The intern will assist curators working on The Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700-1200. This may involve writing or researching short descriptions of manuscripts and groups of manuscripts. The intern will be involved in others aspects of the work of the Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts section, including responding to enquiries and providing talks for students and visitors, thereby gaining insight into various curatorial duties and aspects of collection care. During the internship at the British Library, the intern will enjoy privileged access to printed and manuscript research material, and will work alongside specialists with wide-ranging and varied expertise.

This internship is designed to provide an opportunity for the intern to develop research skills and expertise in medieval history and manuscripts, and in presenting manuscripts to a range of audiences. Previous interns have given feedback that they felt a valued member of the team, gained professional confidence and developed their career by carrying out a ‘real’ job with specific duties.

The programme is only open to students who are engaged actively in research towards, or have recently completed a PhD in a subject area relevant to the study of medieval manuscripts and who have a right to work in the UK full time.

The term of internship is full time (36 hours per week over 5 days) for 6 months. The salary is £9.75 per hour, which is the current London Living Wage. The internship will start in July 2017 or as soon as relevant security checks have been completed.

To apply, please visit www.bl.uk/careers.

Applicants are asked to include answers to the following questions within their Supporting Statement:

  1. Please give examples of your experience in cataloguing medieval manuscripts. 2. Please provide examples of your experience in writing about your research or about manuscripts for a general audience.

Closing Date: 1 May 2017

Interviews will be held on 19 May. The selection process may include questions about the date and origin of a particular manuscript to be shown at the interview.

CFPs: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017

tumblr_nid8xdrz0n1soj7s4o4_500Call for Papers: Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference, Philadelphia, October 12-15, 2017
Deadline: October 25, 2016

For more information on panels, round-tables, short presentations and working groups, and for submission guidelines, see: http://rarebookschool.org/bibliography-conference-2017/

Bibliography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference to be held in Philadelphia from 12 to 15 October 2017, will bring together scholarly professionals poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The Bibliography Among the Disciplines program, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations. The conference sessions will include both traditional and innovative formats: plenary addresses, short presentations, roundtables, workshops, working groups, and site visits. Calls for Proposals and Participants (CFPs) are listed below. The project will culminate in 2019 with a volume of essays contributed by conference participants. The conference and subsequent volume will seek to build on the ongoing series of symposia conducted by Rare Book School’s Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, established in 2012 through funding from the Foundation.

Call for Papers- Panels:

Graphic Representation: Illustration & Diagrams
Session Organizers: Claire Eager (University of Virginia), Jeannie Kenmotsu (University of Pennsylvania)

Textual Instruments
Session Organizer: Nick Wilding (Georgia State University)

Questions of Scale, Production & Labor
Session Organizer: Juliet Sperling (University of Pennsylvania)

Transmission & Transfer of Images
Session Organizer: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley

Degradation, Loss, Recovery & Fragmentation
Session Organizer: Jane Raisch (University of California, Berkeley)

Materiality of Digital Objects
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

The Social Life of Books: Uses of Text & Image Beyond Reading & Viewing
Session Organizers: Aaron Hyman (University of California, Berkeley), Hannah Marcus (Harvard University), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Books as Agents of Contact
Session Organizers: Hansun Hsiung (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Yael Rice (Amherst College)

Manuscript in the Age of Print
Session Organizers: Rachael King (University of California, Santa Barbara), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation
Session Organizer: Lauren Jennings (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Comparative Histories of the Book
Session Organizers: Megan McNamee (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Reappraising the Redundant: The Value of Copies in the Study of Textual Artifacts
Session Organizer: Kappy Mintie (University of California, Berkeley)n and

Call for Papers – Roundtables:

Performance, Textuality & Orality
Session Organizer: Glenda Goodman (University of Pennsylvania)

Authorship
Session Organizers: András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

Digitization, Representation & Access
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

Materiality as a Sustainable Humanistic Discourse
Session Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Ethics & Responsibility in the Bibliosphere
Session Organizer: Claire Eager (University of Virginia)

 Call for papers – Short Presentations:

Tools for Data Analysis & Visualization
Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)

Innovative Pedagogy with Material Objects
Session Organizer: Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)

Teaching Global Book History
Session Organizers: Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University) & Ben Nourse (University of Denver)

Dynamics of Digital Collections
Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University)

The Book and Its Time: Developing a ‘Period Eye’
Session Organizer: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Winterthur Museum)

Call for Papers: Working Groups:

Globalizing Book History & Bibliography
Working Group Organizers: Hwisang Cho (Xavier University), Ben Nourse (University of Denver), Rachel Stein (Columbia University in the City of New York)

Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines
Working Group Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of North Texas), Courtney Roby (Cornell University)

 

Call for Contributions: Edited Volume ‘After the Carolingians: Manuscript Illumination in the Tenth–Eleventh Centuries’

salzburgpericopes001Call for Contributions: edited volume After the Carolingians: Manuscript Illumination in the Tenth–Eleventh Centuries
Deadline: Jun 1, 2016

A great deal of research remains to be done on the substantial and
wide-ranging corpus of illuminated manuscripts produced in continental
Europe between the late ninth and late eleventh centuries. Whether
tucked away in footnotes or relegated to the status of comparanda, the
extant manuscripts from this difficult period of history — particularly
from the regions of modern-day France and Flanders — rarely receive the
focused attention they deserve. Yet many manuscripts from the tenth and
eleventh centuries have the potential to challenge our understanding of
fundamental issues of historical inquiry, including the nature of
artistic originality, various processes of transmission, the working
relationships between artists, patrons and scribes; even the essential
character and functions of illumination.

We seek papers that offer new perspectives on the culture of
illuminated books produced between c. 900 and c. 1050 outside the
established centers of art-historical focus in Anglo-Saxon England and
the Ottonian Empire. Studies of manuscripts originating beyond the
traditional geographic boundaries of the Carolingian Empire are most
welcome, as are studies that coordinate manuscripts with their physical
environment or with works of art in other media, and studies that
reflect upon relationships of “center and periphery” or questions of
regionalism, problematize the issue of artistic quality, or investigate
connections between tenth–eleventh century manuscripts and illumination
of other periods.

Papers will be collected in a volume to be published in the series
“Sense, Matter and Medium: New Approaches to Medieval Culture” (De
Gruyter). We wish also to propose a session on the topic of the volume
at the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America (Toronto,
April 6–8, 2017), which will double as a contributors’ meeting.

Submission: Please send an abstract of your proposed contribution (ca. 300 words) and let
us know whether you would be able to attend the MAA conference.
Deadline: June 1, 2016. Please contact us with any questions.

Beatrice Kitzinger (Princeton University, bkitzinger@princeton.edu)
Joshua O’Driscoll (The Morgan Library and Museum,
jodriscoll@themorgan.org)

Call for Papers: Illuminating Metalwork: Representations of Precious-Metal Objects in Medieval Manuscript Illumination (Saint Louis Conference on Manuscript Studies)

sherborne_lgCall for papers: Illuminating Metalwork: Representations of Precious-Metal Objects in
Medieval Manuscript Illumination (Saint Louis Conference on Manuscript Studies), Vatican Film Library,  Saint Louis University, St. Louis MO, October 14 – 15, 2016
Deadline: May 1, 2016

The Saint Louis Conference on Manuscript Studies is the longest
running annual conference in North America devoted exclusively to
medieval and Renaissance manuscript studies. Organized by the Vatican
Film Library in conjunction with its journal, Manuscripta, the two-day
program each year offers a variety of sessions addressing the
production, distribution, reception, and transmission of pre-modern
manuscripts, including such topics as paleography, codicology,
illumination, textual transmission, library history, provenance,
cataloguing, and others.
Manuscript illuminations frequently place special emphasis on
precious-metal objects both sacred and secular, such as chalices,
reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculptures. Artists
typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys,
“medium-specific” materials that contrasted dynamically with the
surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these
depicted metal objects — lustrous yet flat, almost
anti-representational — could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient, the
viewer: they catch the eye while creating a fertile tension between the
representation of an image and the presentation of a precious stuff,
between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its
real-world referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically,
via its metal material, a doubled representation unavailable to the
remainder of the painted miniature. Such images can take on added
complexity if intended to represent known real-world objects.

This panel seeks to take inventory of how these precious-metal objects
were depicted and how they generated meaning. Possible themes include:
chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of
metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal
figural sculpture, including idols; technique (e.g. pigment vs. leaf);
the semiotics of metal on parchment; and whether we can speak of
“portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of
particular collections. We welcome proposals that consider Western,
Byzantine, and/or Islamic manuscript illumination from the early
through the late Middle Ages.

2016 Guest Speaker: Madeline H. Caviness (Mary Richardson Professor
Emeritus, Tufts University), “Medieval German Law and the Jews: The
Sachsenspiegel Picture-Books”

Submission: Please send (1) an abstract of no more than one page, and (2) a c.v.
with current contact information by Sunday, May 1, 2016 to both panel
organizers: Joseph Salvatore Ackley (ja2998@columbia.edu) and Shannon
L. Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com). Selected papers are to be twenty
minutes in length.

Please note that conference registration fees, and travel and
accommodation expenses, are the responsibility of the panelists and/or
their institutions.
For more information, click here.

Conference: Paper and Parchment: Medieval Music, Architectural Drawings, and Illuminated Books

pandp_0Conference: Paper and Parchment: Medieval Music, Architectural Drawings, and Illuminated Books, Kyle Morrow Room, 3rd Floor, Fondren Library, Rice University, Houston, Texas, April 6, 2016

 

Co-sponsored by the Minter Chair and the Department of Art History.
Free and open to the public.
Schedule:
9:30–9:45 a.m. Welcome
9:45–11:45 a.m. Session No. 1: New Directions in Architectural Drawings
Linda Neagley, “A New Medieval Architectural Drawing”
Rob
ert Bork, “The Regensburg Façade Drawings:
Reality, Fantasy and Geometry”
Discussant: Nancy Wu
Noon–1pm Lunch
1–2:30pm Session No. 2: Workers and Manuscripts
Jennifer Pendergrass Adams, “A Carpenter, a Nobleman, a Fisherman and a Pope: Representations of Class in the Libro dei miracoli”
Layla Seale,”Infernal Labor: Late Medieval Demons at Work”
2:30–4pm Session No. 3: Gender on Paper
and Parchment
Thom Kren, “Toward a Gendered Iconography of Patronage in Books of Hours”
Diane Wolfthal, “Illuminating Infanticide: History and Representation”
4–4:15pm Coffee break
4:15–6:30pm Medieval Music Manuscripts
Rebecca Maloy, “The Old Hispanic Offices of Holy Week”
Peter Loewen, “Singing William Herebert’s English Chant Contrafacta”
Jennifer Saltzstein, “Old French Song Reimagined and Recopied: Contrafacture and Modeling by the Thirteenth-Century Cleric, Trouvères”

For more information, please contact Diane Wolfthal at wolfthal@rice.edu