Tag Archives: illumination

Call for Papers: ‘Rethinking the Carpet Page: Meaning, Materiality, and Historiography’, IMC 2019 (Deadline: 10 September 2018)

440px-meister_des_book_of_lindisfarne_002CFP for International Medieval Congress 2019 at the University of Leeds, July 1-4 2019

The session proposes a fresh look at carpet pages in manuscript books across the medieval world including examples from Jewish, Muslim, and Christian contexts. We seek papers examining the sources for and functions of particular carpet pages as well as papers questioning the paradigm of the “carpet page” as it developed in the scholarly literature.

Please submit a working title and a 250-word proposal for a 20 minute paper by September 10.

Julie Harris
marfiles@comcast.net

 

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Publication – Rose-Marie Ferré, « L’iconographie du Livre du Cœur d’amour épris de René d’Anjou »

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Informations pratiques :

Rose-Marie Ferré, L’iconographie du Livre du Cœur d’amour épris de René d’Anjou, Turnhout, Brepols, 2018 (Répertoire Iconographique de la Littérature du Moyen Age, 6).

145 p., 70 colour ill., 156 x 234 mm, 2018
ISBN: 978-2-503-58002-9

Prix: EUR 60, 00

Le cycle iconographique quasiment complet du Livre du Cœeur d’amour épris est ici envisagé de concert avec le texte, en révèlant ainsi toute sa richesse et sa singularité.

Ce volume est consacré à l’une des œuvres majeures de René d’Anjou conservée aujourd’hui dans le manuscrit français 24399 de la Bibliothèque nationale de France. En un songe allégorique qui est aussi quête chevaleresque, le Cœur personnifié veut rejoindre l’aimée. Les enluminures, par une mise en image efficace et dynamique du texte, rendent surtout la profonde mélancolie, en cette fin du Moyen Âge, d’un sentiment amoureux qui affronte de multiples épreuves.

Comme dans le Mortifiement de Vaine Plaisance, composé deux ans plus tôt et premier volet de ce diptyque littéraire, le cœur (organe supplicié pour le Mortifiement ou Chevalier dépité dans le roman de 1457) n’aura d’autre choix que le renoncement final et la douleur. À cet égard, animé d’un vrai souci spirituel, René d’Anjou fait édifier à la même époque, aux Cordeliers d’Angers, une chapelle dédiée à saint Bernardin de Sienne (1453), pensée comme tombeau pour son cœur. Les sujets évoqués dans le traité de théologie morale ou dans les péripéties sentimentales du chevalier Cœur ne sont pas ainsi sans rappeler les sujets exprimés et représentés dans le petit sanctuaire, échos d’une réflexion sur la Passion du Christ, la rédemption, la Vaine Gloire et le salut de l’âme.

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Call for Papers: Mary of Guelders – Her Life and Prayer Book (ca. 1400) – Nijmegen, 23-24/11/2018 (Deadline 30/03/2018)

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Mary of Guelders’ richly illuminated prayer book, written by Helmich die Lewe and completed in 1415, is extraordinary for several reasons: it originally consisted of more than 600 folia, it is richly illuminated, it was written in the Lower Rhine vernacular, and it contains an unusual compilation of prayers, hours and components of a breviary. These past few years the book has been the focus of a research project spearheaded by the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin and Radboud University in Nijmegen. Their hard work has yielded enough noteworthy results to deserve its own exhibition which will open in Museum Het Valkhof on 13 October 2018 and will run until 6 January 2019. It will feature the research’s findings on the comprehensive and complex prayer book, the life of Mary, Duchess of Jülich and Guelders, and cultural developments in the duchies of Guelders, Jülich and Berg. To mark the occasion of the exhibition entitled ‘I, Mary of Guelders. The duchess and her extraordinary prayer book’ Radboud University is organising a two-day conference in Nijmegen together with Museum Het Valkhof and the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin.

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CFP: Illuminating the Dark Ages: Manuscript art and knowledge in the Early Medieval world (c. 600-1100)

University of Edinburgh, 28th – 29th of June, 2018

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CfP Deadline: March 15

Medieval illuminated scenes and initials today illustrate a myriad of book covers, chosen as the perfect embodiment of a historical episode, idea, or biography. From detailed scenes to sketchy drawings, illuminated manuscripts offer a sometimes overlooked illustration of medieval life. However, unlike the late centuries of the medieval millennium, the study of the Early Middle Ages is not normally backed by abundant documentation, and conjecture and speculation often prevail, particularly in art historical publications. Early medieval illuminated manuscripts were mostly tools of liturgy and prayer, but also patronage statements and transmission agents for science, music, and literature in a historical period. Only in recent decades has the study of this era begun to emerge from the lasting shadow of pejorative Gibbonian assumptions.

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Exhibition: THE MEDIEVAL WORLD AT OUR FINGERTIPS: MANUSCRIPT ILLUMINATIONS FROM THE COLLECTION OF SANDRA HINDMAN

The Art Institute of Chicago, Allerton Galleries
January 27th to May 28th

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The Art Institute of Chicago will exhibit this impressive and broad-ranging collection of approximately thirty exquisite fragments, which was assembled over a lifetime by medieval manuscript scholar and long-time Chicagoan, Sandra Hindman.

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CFP: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

ca7dc72aa646b86adac774b20222768d-medieval-times-medieval-artCall for Submissions: Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval ManuscriptsDeadline
Deadline: December 1, 2017

Edited volume: Illuminating Metalwork: Metal, Object, and Image in Medieval Manuscripts

Volume editors: Joseph Salvatore Ackley and Shannon L. Wearing
Deadline for submitting a proposal (500 words) and brief bio: 1 December 2017

Notification of submission status: 15 December 2017
Anticipated submission of completed texts: 1 October 2018

Historians of Western medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic art are invited to contribute essays to a volume on the representation of precious metalwork in medieval manuscripts.

The makers of medieval manuscripts frequently placed special emphasis on the depiction of precious-metal objects, both sacred and secular, including chalices, reliquaries, crosses, tableware, and figural sculpture. Artists typically rendered these objects using gold, silver, and metal alloys, “medium-specific” materials that richly and pointedly contrasted with the surrounding color pigments. The visual characteristics of these depicted metal things—lustrous yet flat, almost anti-representational—could dazzle, but perhaps also disorient: they grab the eye while creating a fertile tension between the representation of an object and the presentation of a precious stuff, between the pictorial and the material. A gold-leaf chalice signals its referent both iconically, via its shape, and indexically, via its metal material—a semiotic duality unavailable to the remainder of the painted miniature—and such images might accrue additional complexities when intended to represent known real-world objects.

This volume of essays will take inventory of how manuscript illuminators chose to depict precious metalwork and how these depictions generated meaning. The prominent application of metal leaf is one of the most distinguishing features of medieval manuscript illumination (only those books thus decorated technically merit the designation “illuminated”), and yet, despite its hallmark status, it has rarely served as a central subject of scholarly scrutiny and critique. In addressing both the use of metal leaf and the representation of precious-metal objects (via metallic and non-metallic media alike), Illuminating Metalwork seeks to remedy this lacuna. This volume will enhance traditionally fruitful approaches to medieval manuscript illumination, such as those analyzing text/image dynamics, pictorial mimesis, or public vs. private reception, by considering issues of materiality, preciousness, and presence. By focusing on the representation of precious metalwork, these studies will introduce new paths of inquiry beyond the depiction of actual objects and incorporate analyses of the use and simulation of metallic preciousness more broadly.

We invite essays that represent the full temporal and geographic scope of medieval manuscript painting—from Late Antiquity into the early modern era, from the Latin West to the Byzantine and Islamic East—in order to foster trans-historical and cross-cultural analysis. Possible themes include: chronological/geographical specificities in the representation of metalwork in manuscript illuminations; depictions of precious-metal figural sculpture, including idols; artistic technique and technical analysis (e.g. pigment vs. leaf, and the alloys used therein); the semiotics of metal on parchment; the phenomenology of the encounter; and whether we can speak of “portraits” of particular objects and/or visual “inventories” of specific collections.

Please direct all inquiries and submissions to Joseph Ackley (jackley@barnard.edu) and/or Shannon Wearing (slwearing@gmail.com).

CFP: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018

michelino_molinari_da_besozzo_-_st-_luke_painting_the_virgin_-_google_art_projectCall for Papers: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018
Deadline: 20 September 2017

The multimedia fluidity of artists and artisans in the later Middle Ages is an area ripe for investigation. Across diverse regions in Europe and beyond, many illuminators, both named and anonymous, engaged in forms of art-making in addition to the decoration of manuscript books. Some painted frescoes, panels, and ephemera, while others provided designs and supervised the production of stained glass, enamels, tapestries, and other objects. With some frequency, those who specialized in other media were in turn called upon to illuminate books. While modern studies have focused on individual examples of such multi-media talent, the broader implications of this intermedial fluency remain obscure: within the wider art-historical canon, manuscript illumination as an art form is largely seen as derivative or prone to influence from large-scale media.
This session seeks to re-examine the relationship between manuscript illumination and other fields of artistic endeavor in the later Middle Ages. How did artists themselves consider the differing characteristics and ontologies of these varied supports? How did painters adapt their style and working method when engaging with other media and other categories of object? Did the presence of local guild regulations curtail or encourage multi-media practice, and how did this compare region-to-region or to contexts outside of Western Europe? Beyond evident differences in scale, pricing, and technique, interesting issues arise regarding patronage and audience: how different was the clientele for manuscripts compared to that for painting, for example? How did the relative accessibility and visibility of differing art forms affect the visual solutions achieved? Is a book-bound image “freer” or more experimental than a publically visible one?
The session asks these and other questions relevant to those studying the social contexts of art production, the dynamics of reception, materiality, and the technical characteristics of objects. It seeks to be open-minded in terms of methodological approach, and aims to bring together scholars working on diverse material, in order to initiate a larger conversation that can impact the discipline of art history as a whole.
Please send proposals with a one-page abstract and a completed Participant Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to Nicholas Herman (hermanni@upenn.edu) by 20 September 2017.