Tag Archives: illumination

CFP: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018

michelino_molinari_da_besozzo_-_st-_luke_painting_the_virgin_-_google_art_projectCall for Papers: Pictor/Miniator: Working across media, 1250–1500, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies Sponsored Session at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018
Deadline: 20 September 2017

The multimedia fluidity of artists and artisans in the later Middle Ages is an area ripe for investigation. Across diverse regions in Europe and beyond, many illuminators, both named and anonymous, engaged in forms of art-making in addition to the decoration of manuscript books. Some painted frescoes, panels, and ephemera, while others provided designs and supervised the production of stained glass, enamels, tapestries, and other objects. With some frequency, those who specialized in other media were in turn called upon to illuminate books. While modern studies have focused on individual examples of such multi-media talent, the broader implications of this intermedial fluency remain obscure: within the wider art-historical canon, manuscript illumination as an art form is largely seen as derivative or prone to influence from large-scale media.
This session seeks to re-examine the relationship between manuscript illumination and other fields of artistic endeavor in the later Middle Ages. How did artists themselves consider the differing characteristics and ontologies of these varied supports? How did painters adapt their style and working method when engaging with other media and other categories of object? Did the presence of local guild regulations curtail or encourage multi-media practice, and how did this compare region-to-region or to contexts outside of Western Europe? Beyond evident differences in scale, pricing, and technique, interesting issues arise regarding patronage and audience: how different was the clientele for manuscripts compared to that for painting, for example? How did the relative accessibility and visibility of differing art forms affect the visual solutions achieved? Is a book-bound image “freer” or more experimental than a publically visible one?
The session asks these and other questions relevant to those studying the social contexts of art production, the dynamics of reception, materiality, and the technical characteristics of objects. It seeks to be open-minded in terms of methodological approach, and aims to bring together scholars working on diverse material, in order to initiate a larger conversation that can impact the discipline of art history as a whole.
Please send proposals with a one-page abstract and a completed Participant Information Form (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to Nicholas Herman (hermanni@upenn.edu) by 20 September 2017.
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Colloque – Les marges

Le jeudi 18 mai 2017 se tiendra la journée thématique annuelle de l’IRHT consacrée aux marges. Ce thème, qui se trouve au carrefour des sciences du texte, rassemble toutes les sections du laboratoire, en ce qu’il touche aussi bien à la philologie, la lexicographie, l’histoire, la paléographie, qu’à la codicologie.

queen mary psalter f 133v

Marginalia from the Queen Mary psalter f 133v

Autour du texte, dimension essentielle de la culture et de sa transmission, les espaces laissés vides sont devenus le réceptacle de mentions, décors, marques codicologiques, etc. qui participent à son histoire. Sur tous les supports – papyrus, parchemin ou papier, manuscrit ou imprimé – et quel que soit le type de document, des écrits de la pratique aux livres liturgiques, en passant par les textes scientifiques et juridiques, ces ajouts, contemporains ou postérieurs, doivent être analysés. Il s’agira ainsi de rendre compte de pratiques éditoriales (rubriques, manchettes, références, iconographie), de pratiques de lecture et d’utilisation des textes transmis (marques de repérage, annotations, gloses, commentaires), mais également de tout autre type d’ajouts indépendants (mentions de noms, listes de livres, décomptes).

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Les Enluminures: Salon International du Livre Rare & de l’Objet d’Art de Paris (Stand C5) April 7 to 9, 2017

Poster Salon International du livre rare & de l'objet d'art

International Showroom of Rare Books and Artistic Objects

Les Enluminures warmly invites you to visit us at the

SALON INTERNATIONAL DU LIVRE RARE & DE L’OBJET D’ART STAND C5

where we will be exhibiting an exceptional selection of illuminated manuscripts, Books of Hours, Text Manuscripts and miniatures.

 

Highlights of the exhibition

Address:

Grand Palais

Avenue Winston Churchill
75008 Paris

PREVIEW
Thursday, April 6, 5 pm – 10 pm

OPENING HOURS
April 7 to 9, 2017
Daily, 11 am – 8 pm
Sunday, 11 am – 7 pm

1, rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau
75001 Paris
tel +33 1 42 60 15 58
info@lesenluminures.com

Seminar: Flemish Manuscript Illumination and Antwerp Mannerism, 12 October 2016

jacquesdelalaing-600x600Joint Renaissance Medieval Work in Progress Seminar:  Flemish Manuscript Illumination and Antwerp Mannerism

The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London

Wednesday 12 October 2016
  5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Research Forum seminar room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

Speaker  Dr Elizabeth Morrison: Senior Curator of Manuscripts J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Although it has been well established that Flemish manuscript illumination of the sixteenth century was deeply entwined with the art of panel painting, most studies have heretofore largely considered individual artists or looked at the cross-over of particular instances of iconography. The recent acquisition by the J. Paul Getty Museum of a magnificent manuscript of the Livre des fais de Jacques de Lalaing opens new avenues of research into the concept of overall stylistic borrowings between the two media. The manuscript’s miniatures are the work of an unknown artist who was deeply influenced by the work of the so-called “Antwerp Mannerists” in terms of style and the integration of well-known tropes, but also artfully combined with established elements associated with vernacular manuscript painting of the period. This paper will consider how this artist, whose work has been identified in a handful of manuscripts, creates an innovative fusion between the arts of manuscript and panel painting, taking astute advantage of the possibilities offered by both.

Call for Contributions: Edited Volume ‘After the Carolingians: Manuscript Illumination in the Tenth–Eleventh Centuries’

salzburgpericopes001Call for Contributions: edited volume After the Carolingians: Manuscript Illumination in the Tenth–Eleventh Centuries
Deadline: Jun 1, 2016

A great deal of research remains to be done on the substantial and
wide-ranging corpus of illuminated manuscripts produced in continental
Europe between the late ninth and late eleventh centuries. Whether
tucked away in footnotes or relegated to the status of comparanda, the
extant manuscripts from this difficult period of history — particularly
from the regions of modern-day France and Flanders — rarely receive the
focused attention they deserve. Yet many manuscripts from the tenth and
eleventh centuries have the potential to challenge our understanding of
fundamental issues of historical inquiry, including the nature of
artistic originality, various processes of transmission, the working
relationships between artists, patrons and scribes; even the essential
character and functions of illumination.

We seek papers that offer new perspectives on the culture of
illuminated books produced between c. 900 and c. 1050 outside the
established centers of art-historical focus in Anglo-Saxon England and
the Ottonian Empire. Studies of manuscripts originating beyond the
traditional geographic boundaries of the Carolingian Empire are most
welcome, as are studies that coordinate manuscripts with their physical
environment or with works of art in other media, and studies that
reflect upon relationships of “center and periphery” or questions of
regionalism, problematize the issue of artistic quality, or investigate
connections between tenth–eleventh century manuscripts and illumination
of other periods.

Papers will be collected in a volume to be published in the series
“Sense, Matter and Medium: New Approaches to Medieval Culture” (De
Gruyter). We wish also to propose a session on the topic of the volume
at the Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America (Toronto,
April 6–8, 2017), which will double as a contributors’ meeting.

Submission: Please send an abstract of your proposed contribution (ca. 300 words) and let
us know whether you would be able to attend the MAA conference.
Deadline: June 1, 2016. Please contact us with any questions.

Beatrice Kitzinger (Princeton University, bkitzinger@princeton.edu)
Joshua O’Driscoll (The Morgan Library and Museum,
jodriscoll@themorgan.org)