Author Archives: ameliahyde

About ameliahyde

Amelia holds an MA from The Courtauld Institute of Art, where she studied cross-cultural artistic traditions of medieval Northern Spain, taking an in-depth look at the context and role of Spanish ivories within sacred spaces. She has researched medieval ivories in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Victoria & Albert Museum, and The British Museum. At The British Museum, she has also researched illuminated manuscripts ranging from the 12th to 15th centuries.

Scholarship: British Archeological Association Shrewsbury Conference 2019

Student Scholarships available for the British Archeological Association’s Shrewsbury Conference, 15-19 July, 2019

BAAThe 2019 BAA Conference will explore the art, architecture and archaeology of medieval Shrewsbury and north Shropshire. Lectures will include papers on subjects as varied as late Roman Shropshire, Shrewsbury’s medieval topography, the patronage, art, architecture and archaeology of medieval churches in and around Shrewsbury, stone sculpture, alabasters, roof bosses, seals, and nineteenth-century antiquarianism.

Site visits will include St Mary’s, St Alkmund, Bear Steps, the Town Walls and Shrewsbury Abbey, while there will be two coach excursions (one full & one half-day) outside Shrewsbury. These will encompass Acton Burnell (church and castle), Wenlock Priory, Buildwas Abbey, Haughmond Abbey, Atcham, Shifnal, and Tong.

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CFP: St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference (6-8 June, 2019)

St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies Graduate Conference

6 – 8 June, 2019

Deadline: 31 March, 2019

K104208

The British Library, Egerton 2899, Psalter of the Gallican Version, Scotland, 15th century, f. 30, detail.

We are announcing a call for papers for the second St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) Graduate Conference. This three-day conference is aimed at graduate students and early career researchers in any area of Medieval Studies. The second day of the conference will be devoted to the theme Politics and Political Thought and we would particularly welcome abstracts related to this topic from scholars working in any of the fields mentioned below. We aim to encompass a range of historical perspectives, from art to archeology, law to literature.

The keynote addresses will be delivered by Professor Carole Hillenbrand (Edinburg & St Andrews) and Dr Charles West (Sheffield).

Proposals relating to the following fields of research are especially welcome:

  • Eastern Mediterranean studies
  • Art and architecture
  • The church and religious life
  • Crusading
  • Late Antiquity
  • Latin poetry
  • Law
  • Middle Eastern studies
  • Philosophy
  • Rulership and lordship
  • Scottish history
  • Texts and manuscripts

It is anticipated that there shall be no registration free and that some travel bursaries will be available. Papers should be a maximum of 20 minutes in length.

Please email 250-word abstracts to saimsgraduateconference@gmail.com by 31st March 2019.

CONF: Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics

Conference & Poetry Reading: Remembering the Middle Ages?

April 5-6, 2019

2 Locations:

Bush House, Aldwych, King’s College London
The London Global Gateway, 1-4 Suffolk Street, University of Notre Dame

A partnership between the University of Notre Dame (London Global Gateway) and King’s College London, ‘Remembering the Middle Ages? Reception, Identity, Politics’ asks speakers and attendees to consider how the concept of a ‘cultural memory’ of the Middle Ages can be useful (or not) in understanding how and why scholars, artists, readers, and others have resourced or imagined the Middle Ages, in any post-medieval period. We ask participants to interrogate the linguistic, material, and social networks that have been created by medieval things over time. Haruko Momma (University of Toronto) and Sarah Salih (King’s College London) will give a keynote panel, and the event also includes a reading featuring poets Vahni Capildeo and Ian Duhig and chaired by Professor Clare Lees (Director of the Institute for English Studies). Further details are forthcoming at our website: http://sites.nd.edu/remembering-the-middle-ages.

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Workshop: Manipulating the Sun (Wuppertal, 21-23 Aug 19)

Manipulating the Sun: Picturing Astronomical Miracles from the Bible in the Early Modern Era

Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Interdisciplinary Centre for Science and Technology Studies

August 21 – 23, 2019

Deadline: Mar 17, 2019

Royal 20 B.XX, f.3

The British Library, Royal 20 B XX, f. 3,  c. 1420, “Astronomy and Geometry”

The workshop is being organized by the research project Iconography of the Imagery on Early Modern Scientific Instruments (funded by the German Research Foundation, DFG).

One of the aspects being analysed in the project is biblical imagery that could be related to astronomy. Of particular interest is imagery that was used to argue against the Copernican system from the mid-16th century such as the miracles of the Sun reversing its course in II Kings 20:8-11/Isaiah 38:8 (Horologium Ahas) and the Sun standing still in Joshua 10:12.

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CONF: SAH 2019 Annual International Conference (Providence, 24-28 Apr 19)

Society of Architectural Historians Annual International Conference, 2019

Providence, RI, April 24 – 28, 2019

Architectural and art historians, architects, preservationists and museum professionals from around the world will meet in Providence, R.I., April 24–28, 2019, for the 72nd Annual International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians. Over 600 SAH members will convene at the Rhode Island Convention Center to share new research on the history of the built environment and address current issues in the field in paper sessions, roundtables, workshops, and panel discussions.

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CFP: Revolution and Revolutions in Art (Ljubljana, 12-14 Sep 19)

5th International Conference for PhD Students and Recent PhD Graduates: “Revolution and Revolutions in Art”

Deadline: Apr 15, 2019

The University of Ljubljana, The Center for Iconographic Studies, The University of Belgrade, and The University of Split, introduce their 5th International Conference for PhD students and Recent PhD graduates, Revolution and Revolutions in Art. Challenging PhD students, young researchers and scholars from different fields of humanities and social sciences, the conference seeks to address a multitude of questions, dilemmas, perspectives and problems related to the idea of revolution in art. We welcome theoretical, empirical and methodological papers addressing the theme. We also encourage different aspects and approaches and especially invite submissions that address the following topics:

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New Book: Cut in Alabaster: A Material of Sculpture and its European Traditions, 1330-1530

Cut in Alabaster: A Material of Sculpture and its European Traditions 1330-1530

By Kim Woods

ISBN 978-1-909400-26-9

Cut in Alabaster is the first comprehensive study of alabaster sculpture in Westernk.-wood-book-cover Europe during the late Middle Ages and Renaissance.

While marble is associated with Renaissance Italy, alabaster was the material commonly used elsewhere in Europe and has its own properties, traditions and meanings. It enjoyed particular popularity as a sculptural material during the two centuries 1330-1530, when alabaster sculpture was produced both for indigenous consumption and for export. Focussing especially on England, the Burgundian Netherlands and Spain,  three territories closely linked through trade routes, diplomacy and cultural exchange, this book explores and compares the material practice and visual culture of alabaster sculpture in late medieval Europe. Cut in Alabaster charts sculpture from quarry to contexts of use, exploring practitioners, markets and functions as well as issues of consumption, display and material meanings. It provides detailed examination of tombs, altarpieces and both elite and popular sculpture, ranging from high status bespoke commissions to small, low-cost carvings produced commercially for a more popular clientele.

Kim Woods is a senior lecturer in Art History at the Open University, and a specialist in northern European late Gothic sculpture. She combines an object-based approach with an interest in materials and cultural exchange. Her single-authored book, Imported Images (Donington, 2007), focussed on wood sculpture. Since then she has been working on alabaster. Her Open University distance learning materials include the Renaissance Art Reconsidered volumes (Yale, 2007) and Medieval to Renaissance (Tate publishing, 2012).