Author Archives: ameliahyde

About ameliahyde

Amelia holds an MA from The Courtauld Institute of Art, where she studied cross-cultural artistic traditions of medieval Northern Spain, taking an in-depth look at the context and role of Spanish ivories within sacred spaces. She has researched medieval ivories in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Victoria & Albert Museum, and The British Museum. At The British Museum, she has also researched illuminated manuscripts ranging from the 12th to 15th centuries.

#MetGala In All Its Glory

We’ve now had a week to digest the photos, the fashion, and the inevitable memes of Met Gala 2018. Hopefully a week has been enough time to take in the weird, wonderful, and worshipful experience that was this year’s annual fundraiser for the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute. Each year the gala’s theme is based on the Institute’s summer exhibition, and on 10 May Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination opened at both the Met’s 5th Avenue and Cloisters locations. Kim Kardashian was compared to a Eucharist chalice, haloes abounded, and ‘Rihanna going full pope’ is now a phrase.

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Conference: Manuscripts from Ethiopia and Eritrea (Oxford, 1 Sept 2018)

This free study day will act as an introduction to Ethiopian and Eritrean manuscripts  dating from the 4th to 18th centuries. Context, production, and patronage will be discussed by leading experts from institutions such as The British Library and SOAS. See the detailed schedule and link to register below.

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10 Must-See Temporary Exhibitions this Summer

The end of term is in sight and the days are getting longer. And that means we’re all daydreaming of summer. Whether your summer plans call for research or relaxation, take advantage of some stellar temporary exhibitions happening around the globe that are highlighting the production, context, and craftsmanship of medieval art. These exhibitions are pushing boundaries, considering new contexts, and boasting bold feats—several of these exhibitions present artworks on view in North America and Europe for the first time. Let us know your favourites by sharing your thoughts in the comments below. Happy Summer!

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Conference: Roads, Routes and Networks: Visualizing Art Historical Information, Cambridge, MA (30 April 2018)

Roads, Routes and Networks: Visualizing Art Historical Information
Digital Humanities Colloquium

Cambridge (MA), Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University, RCC Conference Room, 26 Trowbridge St., April 30, 2018

Space and movement have always been fundamental for art history, through concepts such as center and periphery, roads for global exchange, or the experience of travel, among others. Geographical Information Systems are transforming the traditional ways to visualize these disciplinary discourses about dissemination, innovation and evolution. Network analysis is bringing to light people and places that had been very relevant in their own time as nodes for exchange or partnership, but have been usually overlooked by the focus on a few big names. Vast and quickly increasing amounts of digital data invite experimentation about their uses for teaching and research in the humanities. New challenges are appearing, such as ensuring the sustainability of digital resources and their interoperability, while guaranteeing open access to cultural information. The three case studies represented in the colloquium will provide an update on new and ongoing projects in this area, and introduce a shared reflection about the possibilities of digital information within art history.
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CFP: Museums and Identities, Warsaw, Poland (Deadline 1 May 2018)

Museums and Identities

Museum of King Jan III’s Palace at Wilanów                                                                      Warsaw, Poland, November 21 – 23, 2018
Deadline: May 1, 2018

By ICOM Austria, ICOM Czech Republic, ICOM Slovakia, ICOM Poland
and Museum of King Jan III’s Palace at Wilanów

“Museums and landscapes are an essential element of humanity’s physical, natural, social and symbolic environment.” Based on this first sentence from the ICOM Resolution of the 24th  ICOM General Conference in Milano 2016 “The Responsibility of Museums Towards Landscape” we want to continue the discussion initiated during the first Seminar in 2017, about the impact museums have and how they react to the landscape that surrounds them, urban or rural. What particular responsibility for protecting this natural heritage and to promote sustainable development do museums have?

But the term “Landscape” also implies other perspectives: How are museums influencing the cultural, social, economic or political identity of the area and society they are situated in? They choose what objects are collected, presented and protected, what stories are told and how. They define what is handed on to future generations. “With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility” to quote Winston Churchill, Theodore Roosevelt and Spider-Man. Therefor we want to question the role of governmental authorities or financial sponsor and how they might influence the presentation or content of exhibitions. How do museums react to financial dependencies or state-ideologies?

As we are celebrating the European Year of Cultural Heritage this year, we celebrate the diverse cultural heritage across Europe. We want to raise the question if museums not only preserve Europe’s cultural heritage at national, regional and local level, but if they also are in the position to be an important factor to contribute to build an European identity that is felt to be still missing.

Call for Papers:

Topics of interest for submission include:
1. Perspectives: Different Identities and Missions of Museums
2. Neighbours: Impact of Museums on Cultural Landscapes and Social Networks
3. Politics: Museums in Historical and Contemporary Context
4. Nature: Environmental Impact of Museums
5. Economy: Impact of Museums on Local Development & Financial Sustainability
6. European Union: Impact of Museums on European Identity

We invite to send an original research abstracts, case studies before the Abstract submission deadline. All research papers will be evaluated by international Committee.  All the accepted abstracts will be eligible to be presented at the seminar after the confirmation of participation.

Applications:
Please complete the attached application form and send it to:
konferencja@muzeum-wilanow.pl

Downloads:
CFP:
http://icom-oesterreich.at/sites/icom-oesterreich.at/files/attachments/call_for_papers.pdf

Application:
http://icom-oesterreich.at/sites/icom-oesterreich.at/files/attachments/cfp_app_form.docx

Important Dates:
Abstract submission deadline: May 1, 2018
Notification of accepted applications: May 31,2018

Language:
English

Publication:
Selection of lectures will be published

CFP: The Global Turn in Medieval Studies (Deadline 15 June 2018)

The Global Turn in Medieval Studies: the 94th Annual Meeting of The Medieval Academy of America

 

University of Pennsylvania

7-9 March 2019 | http://www.medievalacademy.org

The 94th Annual Meeting of the Medieval Academy of America will take place in Philadelphia on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania. The meeting is jointly hosted by the Medieval Academy of America, Bryn Mawr College, Delaware Valley Medieval Association, Haverford College, St. Joseph’s University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Villanova University.

Medievalists across various disciplines are taking a more geographically and methodologically global approach to the study of the Middle Ages. While the Organizing Committee invites proposals for papers on all topics and in all disciplines and periods of medieval studies, this year’s conference spotlights the “global turn” in medieval studies. To this end, we encourage session and paper proposals that treat the Middle Ages as a broad historical and cultural phenomenon, encompassing the full extent of Europe as well as the Middle East, southern and eastern Asia, Africa, and beyond.  We also invite proposals that explore departures from traditional teleological discourses rooted in national interests, ones that apply disciplinary and interdisciplinary methods to study a broad array of subjects.

We especially encourage proposals that provoke explorations of the following “big questions”:

1) Periodization and the drawing of geographic borders in medieval studies can be helpful, but can also limit our ability to make connections, see patterns, or entertain dialogue among specialists in individual sub-fields. What do we mean when we speak of the “Middle Ages” in geographic, temporal, or disciplinary terms? What do we mean when we use contemporary geographical concepts, such as Europe or Asia? What do we mean when we say “Global Middle Ages”? What is in and what is out?

2) If we are to turn away from national models, what is an alternative?  For instance, how can methodologies that highlight networks further our understanding of the “Global Middle Ages”? How might they contribute, for example, to understanding mechanisms of knowledge sharing and the development and use of religious, economic, and political systems?

3) Across all cultures in the medieval world, philosophers, theologians, scholars, healers, poets, artists, and musicians sought to understand the natural world and to apply that understanding to concrete ends. How do we make sense of their efforts? How might traditional paradigms of what we call “science,” philosophical inquiry, literary, and artistic practice be challenged?

4) Medieval studies has been at the forefront of the “digital turn” over the past few decades. How have digital approaches to scholarship altered the landscape for better or worse? In a global context, have new technologies broken barriers or created new ones? How do we create and evaluate digital scholarship in medieval studies vis à vis traditional methods?

Within the framework of these “big questions”, the organizing committee proposes the following threads:

*    Uses of the Medieval
*    Expanding Geographies of the Medieval
*    Re-thinking Periodization: Beyond Eurocentrism and Postcolonialism
*    Medieval Foundations of Contemporary Politics
*    Alexander the Great and World Thinking
*    Medieval Cosmologies
*    The Trojan Myth and Genealogies
*    What is Medieval/European/Literature?
*    Transmission and Technologies of Knowledge
*    Doing Science at Court
*    The Locations of Learning
*    Myths and Legends of Languages and Letters
*    Dante, Local and Global: Towards 2021
*    Deconstructing “National” Legal Traditions
*    Gender Matters
*    Ars/Arts: Intersections Across Disciplines and Borders
*    Global Manuscript Markets and Movements
*    Digitizing the Global Middle Ages: Practices, Sustainability, and Ethics
*    Approaches to Historiography
*    Interfaith Encounters, Real and Imagined
*    Religious and Cultural Ethics across Cultures: Conversation or Confrontation?
*    Saints and Sages
*    Words and Music

Proposals
Individuals may propose a:
*    single paper for a listed thread
*    full session on a listed thread
*    single paper not designated for a specific thread
*    full session on a topic outside the listed threads
*    poster, paper, full session, or workshop that explores the role and uses of digital technologies

Sessions are 90 minutes long, and typically consist of three 20-minute papers. Proposals should be geared to that length. The committee is interested in other formats as well: poster sessions, roundtables, workshops, etc. The Program Committee may suggest a different format for some sessions after the proposals have been reviewed.

Any member of the Medieval Academy may submit a proposal; others may submit proposals as well but must become members in order to present papers at the meeting. Special consideration will be given to individuals whose field would not traditionally involve membership in the Medieval Academy.
In order to be considered, proposals must be complete and include the following:

(1) A cover sheet containing the proposer’s name, statement of Medieval Academy membership (or statement that the individual’s specialty would not traditionally involve membership in the Academy), professional status, email address, postal address, home or cell and office telephone numbers, fax number (if available), and paper title;

(2) A second sheet containing the proposer’s name, session for which the proposal should be considered, title, 250-word abstract, and audio-visual equipment requirements.

(3) Additional sheets as necessary containing all of the above information, plus a session abstract, when a full panel for a session is being proposed.

Submissions: Proposals should be submitted as attached PDFs to the MAA Program Committee by email to MAA2019@TheMedievalAcademy.org

The deadline is 15 June 2018.

Please do not send proposals directly to the Organizing Committee members.

Selection Procedure: Paper and panel proposals will be reviewed for their quality and for the significance and relevance of their topics. The Organizing Committee will evaluate proposals during the summer of 2018 and the Committee will inform all successful and unsuccessful proposers by 10 September 2018.

Organizing Committee Members:
Lynn Ransom & Julia Verkholantsev, University of Pennsylvania (co-chairs)
Daud Ali, University of Pennsylvania
Chris Atwood, University of Pennsylvania
Kevin Brownlee, University of Pennsylvania
Mary Caldwell, University of Pennsylvania
Linda Chance, University of Pennsylvania
Paul M. Cobb, University of Pennsylvania
Catherine Conybeare, Bryn Mawr College
Talya Fishman, University of Pennsylvania
Fr. Allan Fitzgerald, Villanova University
Scott Francis, University of Pennsylvania
Nicholas Herman, University of Pennsylvania
Tom Izbicki, Rutgers University & Delaware Valley Medieval Association
Ada Kuskowski, University of Pennsylvania
Ann Matter, University of Pennsylvania
Maud McInerney, Haverford College
Paul Patterson, St. Joseph’s University
Montserrat Piera, Temple University
Dot Porter, University of Pennsylvania
Jerry Singerman, University of Pennsylvania Press
Emily Steiner, University of Pennsylvania
Eva del Soldato, University of Pennsylvania
Elly Truitt, Bryn Mawr College
David Wallace, University of Pennsylvania (ex officio as MAA president)

 

Workshop: Art and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650) (23 April 18)

2nd International Workshop:
Art and Court Cultures in the Iberian World (1400-1650)

Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, April 23, 2018

Visual strategies of legitimization became increasingly important for Iberian monarchies during the late medieval and early modern periods. Their dynastic, diplomatic, and military endeavors called for effective propaganda, both in the metropolis and in viceregal territories. Such efforts include architecture, both ephemeral and permanent, the decoration of palaces, court portraiture, and historiography. The advent of the Monarchia Hispanica under Habsburg rule required careful elaborations of national, religious, racial, and gender identities, across a mosaic of multilingual and multiethnic populations. This second workshop aims to highlight some of these strategies, and to consolidate a forum for discussion of further research avenues, under the guidance of scholars from Spanish and American universities. It is made possible thanks to the collaboration of Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University, and University of Valencia.

16.00 Welcome, opening remarks and panel.
Panelists:
– Replicating the Royal Image: Philip III’s portrait at Harvard Art Museums.
Cristina Morilla, Associate Paintings Conservator, Harvard Art Museums.

– Alliance, Emulation and Competition in the Habsburg Netherlands: The Case of a 16th-Century Alabaster Funerary Monument in Heverlee.
Jessie Park, Rousseau Curatorial Fellow in European Art, Harvard Art Museums.

– Sofonisba Anguissola’s Self-Portraiture, from Court Propaganda to Meta-Artistic Sign. Jorge Sebastián Lozano, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Valencia; Research Fellow, Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard University.

17.30 Q & A
Discussion moderated by Prof. Felipe Pereda, Fernando Zóbel de Ayala Professor of Spanish Art, Harvard University.

Location:
RCC Conference Room
26 Trowbridge St.
Cambridge, MA

Free registration. Please RSVP at
https://rcc.harvard.edu/event/2nd-international-workshop-art-and-court-cultures-iberian-world-1400-1650