Category Archives: Upcoming Events

BAA Tower of London Study Day, Saturday November 2nd, 2019

The British Archaeological Association Study Day at the Tower of London will enable us to look closely at some recent research, both historical and archaeological, to learn about curating practices and restoration of wall paintings at the tower, and to explore spaces that are often closed to the public.

Provisional programme:

11:30 Introduction (Sally Dixon-Smith)

12:30 Byward Tower Wall Painting (Group A) with Jane Spooner

12:30 Resent Research on the Historic Residential Accommodation at Tower Green (Group B) with Agnieszka Sadraei

1:00 Byward Tower Wall Painting (Group B) with Jane Spooner

1:00 Resent Research on the Historic Residential Accommodation at Tower Green (Group A) with Agnieszka Sadraei

1:30 Introduction to the Royal Lodgings Jeremy Ashbee
1:45 Independent Lunch Break and time to explore
3:00 Chapel of St John and White Tower with Jeremy Ashbee 3:45 Chapel of St Peter with Jessica Barker (in two groups)

 

Places for the Study Day are limited to 20, of which up to 10 are reserved for students.

The cost of the day will be £40 for members. The fee includes a ticket for the Tower of London. The event is free for students, for whom travel grants (to a maximum of £50) are also available.

To apply please e-mail studydays@thebaa.org – by September 20th, 2019.

Please state in the email whether you are a member of the BAA or a student.

All names will be entered into a ballot for the study day and the successful applicants will be notified by September 23rd.

London Society for Medieval Studies 2018-19 Programme

The London Society for Medieval Studies is back for the new academic year!

We are very excited that our autumn programme of seminars will be commencing soon. Please find attached our full programme for the autumn and spring terms 2018-19. Make sure to get those dates into your diary!

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Les Enluminures: Masterpiece London 2017 (STAND B1)

Les Enluminures looks forward to welcoming you to the 2018 edition of

MASTERPIECE LONDON

STAND B1

This year we are teaming up with Daniel Crouch Rare Books. Our joint display “A brief History of Time: from Matins to Mars” will explore methods of marking and keeping time throughout history.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW OUR FAIR HIGHLIGHTS

On July 2 at 4pm Dr Christopher de Hamel, Senior Vice-President at Les Enluminures, manuscript scholar and award-winning author will give a talk on “How to Look at Medieval Manuscripts”.
The event will take place in the Lecture Theatre, in association with Chopard. Advanced registration essential.
Please find here further information.

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Horse sessions at IMC 2018

horse lungedA series of four horse sessions and a Round Table, organised by Anastasija Ropa and Timothy Dawson, will take place during the International Medieval Congress 2018.

Palfreys and rounceys, hackneys and packhorses, warhorses and coursers, not to mention the mysterious ‘dung mare’ – they were all part of everyday life in the Middle Ages. Every cleric and monk, no matter how immersed in his devotional routine and books he would be, every nun, no matter how reclusive her life, every peasant, no matter how poor his household, would have some experience of horses. To the medieval people, horses were as habitual as cars in the modern times. Besides, there was the daily co-existence with horses to which many representatives of the gentry and nobility – both male and female – were exposed, which far exceeds the experience of most amateur riders today. We cannot reconstruct or re-experience the familiar and casual communication between humans and equids of the Middle Ages – or can we? At our sessions on the Medieval Horse, we will try to deduce, describe and debate the place of the horse in medieval society.

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Secret Spaces: Medieval Sacristies, Vestries, Treasure Rooms and their Contents

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Salisbury Cathedral Treasure House, Upper Champber, from “Pituresque Memorials of Salisbury” by Peter Hall (1834), courtesy of the Society of Antiquaries.

The aim of the conference is to introduce the subject of ecclesiastical treasure houses to both the academic world and the wider public.

Treasure houses take the form of small buildings attached as annexes to the cathedrals and churches which they served. Their function as store houses of the priceless ecclesiastical treasure belonging to the church meant that they were accessible to only a few privileged individuals but many are resplendent pieces of architecture in their own right. Recently Yves Gallet, in discussing an ambitious vault within the thirteenth-century treasure house of Saint-Urbain, Troyes, noted that ‘it is curious that they should have placed such a spectacular and up-to-date ornament in a place where it was never going to be seen’. Notable treasure houses in Britain are attached to the cathedrals of Canterbury, Lincoln, Wells, and Bristol, to name but a few. However, medieval ecclesiastical treasure houses existed everywhere in the medieval West and this will be reflected in the conference, which will bring together scholars from different countries. Ecclesiastical treasure houses also stored money, the presence of which necessitated the activities of depositing, guarding and counting. The ecclesiastical treasure house thus occupied a fault line between two opposing ideologies in medieval Christian thinking, the first condemning the accumulation of worldly treasure and the second promoting its use for God’s service.

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Arte, Architettura e Umanesimo a Bologna, 1446-1530 (Bologna, 13-15 Jun 2018)

humanism, bolognaBologna (Italia), June 13 – 15, 2018

Dipartimento delle Arti, Complesso di S. Cristina, piazzetta G. Morandi 2 – Bologna

Bologna non è unanimemente riconosciuta come una delle capitali dell’Umanesimo, al pari di Firenze e Padova. Tuttavia la qualità delle scelte operate in campo artistico sottintende un rinnovamento culturale che gli studi moderni hanno cominciato a indagare. Da sempre crocevia di esperienze, anche nel Rinascimento Bologna riuscì a produrre e attrarre talenti d’eccellenza che seppero naturalizzarsi nel contesto cittadino e ricavarne nuovi spunti di riflessione e di creazione. Ne nacque, anche grazie all’ambiziosa magnificenza del clan bentivolesco e alla perdurante vitalità dell’antico Studium, una civiltà figurativa, architettonica e letteraria omogenea e ben connotata, capace di muoversi tra stravaganze eccentriche e punte di rustica classicità. Un processo che non si interruppe nemmeno dopo la traumatica cacciata degli stessi Bentivoglio, ma che anzi toccò un apice nel 1530, quando la solenne incoronazione di Carlo V riportò Bologna al centro della scena continentale.
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