Category Archives: Upcoming Events

Conference: Collecting Medieval Art: Past, Present and Future, Sam Fogg and Luhring Augustine at the SVA Theatre, New York, 27 January 2018

Sam Fogg and Luhring Augustine at the SVA Theatre, New York. 27 January 2018

Collecting Medieval Art: Past, Present and Future

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A symposium on the history of collecting medieval art, to be held in celebration of the exhibition ‘Of Earth and Heaven: Art from the Middle Ages’ [January 29 –March 10, 2018] at Luhring Augustine in conjunction with Sam Fogg, the world’s leading dealer in medieval art.

Every surviving art treasure of the Middle Ages has a unique material history spanning centuries. These precious objects have been traded, preserved, restored, lent and loved. Some passed through many hands, others remained untouched and forgotten for generations before returning to the spotlight. These histories of collections and collectors yield valuable insights into the medieval jewels that brighten the private and public art collections of today.

This symposium will consider practices of collecting medieval art in a unique setting, within galleries displaying many of the finest masterpieces of Medieval and Renaissance art still in private hands. Surrounded by monumental works like sections of Canterbury Cathedral’s south transept window and miniature treasures like a thirteenth-century Limoges reliquary chasse, speakers will explore attitudes to collecting medieval art in the past, present and future.

The symposium is free to attend, but guests should RSVP to rsvp@luhringaugustine.com before Wednesday, December 20, 2017 to reserve a place. Email Imogen.Tedbury@courtauld.ac.uk for more information.

 

9.30 am Doors open for registration and coffee

9.45am Welcome from Sam Fogg

10.00am Session 1: collecting and display chaired by Dr Sarah Guérin

Dr Paul Williamson – ‘Showing collections of medieval art: strategies of display, from private to public’

Dr Timothy B. Husband – ‘Collecting Medieval Art for The Cloisters: the three that got away’

11.30am coffee

11.45pm Session 2: collecting, cultural heritage and the art market chaired by Dr Nicholas A. Herman

Dr Martina Bagnoli – ‘Dealers, Collectors and Curators: a productive relationship in 19th century Italy’

Dr Jack Hinton and Dr Amy Gillette – ‘“A study close at hand of these fine examples of Gothic decoration”: the collecting, interpretation and display of the Taylor collection of English medieval woodcarvings’

 

13.15 lunch and chance to view the exhibition at Luhring Augustine

2.30pm Session 3: collecting medieval art, past and present

Professor Susie Nash – ‘Collecting art at the Courts of France in the late-fourteenth century’

Sir Paul Ruddock and Dr C. Griffith Mann – ‘In Conversation: Collecting Medieval Art Today’

3.45pm closing remarks from Dr C. Griffith Mann

4pm chance to view the exhibition at Luhring Augustine

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Lecture: The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, “very much like the residence of the Muslim kings”?’ SOAS, 7pm, 11 October 2017

ISLAMIC ART CIRCLE at SOAS
Monthly Lecture

A 207
The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings’?
Dr Tom Nickson
Wednesday, 11 October 2017
7.00 p.m., Khalili Lecture Theatre, Main Building, SOAS
Chaired by Professor Hugh Kennedy
Enquiries: rosalindhaddon@gmail.com

CFP: Medievalism and the Rediscovery of Medieval Art (International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018)

mermaidCall for papers: Medievalism and the Rediscovery of Medieval Art (International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2018)

Deadline: September 15

Required: 300-word abstract and CV

From archaeology to the archive, medieval studies can be traced through various discoveries – from the physical uncovering of artifacts and collections that shift the canon, to periods of concentrated, sometimes unprecedented, attention received by an artist, medium, region or particular artifact. Parallel to these physical and theoretical discoveries, the reuse and display of medieval styles, motifs and objects has brought scholarly discovery into contemporary discourse, and the reception of medieval objects into areas beyond academia. Each generation has their own vision of the Middle Ages, from Horace Walpole to William Morris, from J.R.R. Tolkien to George R.R. Martin. Through the imitation and inspiration of the past, figures interested in medieval art have added their own preoccupations into how the period is understood, from the sixteenth century up to the present day. The same is true of scholars and collectors, who have promoted particular geographical or political agendas in their study and favouring of particular schools, regions, countries, and empires.

At a time when facts seem flexible and the consensus seems fragmented, a considerationof the agendas behind the presentation of medieval studies seems timely. We are interested in the phenomenon of discovery as event, narrative, academic and artistic moment, in how discoveries alter how we understand history and shift disciplines. Discoveries often teach us as much about the society doing the discovering as the objects being discovered, in both the field of medieval studies and the broader picture of medieval art reception. As such, it seems appropriate to consider academic discovery and popular discovery side by side. How might one affect the other? What parallels can be drawn between different kinds of discoveries?

This session seeks papers about how such discoveries can be and are engendered, and how contemporary concerns affect the presentation or process of scholarly and popular discovery. Possible topics might include the re-use of medieval or medievalising motifs in subsequent centuries and contemporary culture, medievalising restorations, particular medieval collectors or collections, the appropriation of medieval aesthetics, old objects in new settings, case studies of particular discoveries or rediscoveries, the changing display of medieval artifacts, and how political and geographical agendas affect the reception of medieval art.

Please send 300-word abstracts, together with a CV, to thalia.allington-wood@ucl.ac.uk and imogen.tedbury@courtauld.ac.uk by September 15.

Conf: The Book as Medium: Medieval Manuscripts & their Functions, VIENNA (1st – 2nd Sep 2017)

01. – 02.09.2017
Registration deadline: Aug 15, 2017

Das Buch als Medium – Mittelalterliche Handschriften und ihre Funktionen
Interdisziplinäre Graduiertentagung

Universität Wien
Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Altes AKH
Spitalgasse 2, Hof 9
1090 Wien

While participation is free we ask that delegates register via this link by 15. August 2017:
tagung.buchfunktion.kunstgeschichte@univie.ac.at

PROGRAMM

Freitag, 01. September 2017

08:30 – 09:00 Uhr: Registrierung, Kennenlernen, Kaffee
09:00 – 09:15 Uhr: Grußworte

09:15 – 10:15 Uhr: Keynote
09:15 – 10:15 Uhr Kathryn Rudy (St. Andrews)

10:15 – 10:30 Uhr: Pause

10:30 – 12:00 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Gerd Micheluzzi)
10:30 Uhr
Kristina Kogler (Wien): Vidal Mayor – Die Bebilderung einer
aragonesischen Rechtshandschrift
10:50 Uhr     Diskussion
11:00 Uhr
Bernhard Kjölbye (Graz): Über den Bildschmuck der ‚Zwettler Bärenhaut‘
aus genealogischer Sicht
11:20 Uhr Diskussion
11:30 Uhr
Philippa Sissis (Berlin): Zwischen Lesen und Schreiben – Humanistische
Inszenierung in Relation zum Text
11:50 Uhr Diskussion

12:00 – 14:00 Uhr: Mittagspause

14:00 – 18:30 Uhr: Ausflug zum Augustiner-Chorherrenstift
Klosterneuburg (für Mitwirkende)

19:00 Uhr: Abendessen

Samstag, 02. September

08:45 – 09:00 Uhr: Kaffee

09:00 – 10:30 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Christina Jackel)
09:00 Uhr
Sophie Zimmermann (Wien): Büchergenealogien. Über imaginierten und
tatsächlichen Verlust deutschsprachiger Texte und Handschriften
09:20 Uhr Diskussion
09:30 Uhr
Timo Bülters (Oxford): Auf Spurensuche im Kloster – Ein niederdeutsches
Kräuterbuch in Nonnenhand
09:50 Uhr Diskussion
10:00 Uhr
Giulia Rossetto (Wien): Using and Re-Using Parchment Manuscripts: The
Case of the Byzantine Prayer-Books
10:20 Uhr Diskussion

10:30 – 10:50 Uhr: Pause

10:50 – 12:20 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Lena Sommer)
10:50 Uhr
Alexander Hödlmoser (Wien):    Die Österreichische Chronik der Jahre
1454 bis 1467. Editorische Anmerkungen zur Arbeit am Text – damals und
heute
11:10 Uhr Diskussion
11:20 Uhr
Eszter Nagy (Budapest): The Function of Mythological Images in Books of
Hours from Rouen
11:40 Uhr     Diskussion
11:50 Uhr
Irina von Morzé (Wien): Eine Weltgeschichte für den Kaiser: Rom, BAV,
Vat. lat. 5697 (vor 1437)
12:10 Uhr Diskussion

12:20 – 13:45 Uhr: Mittagspause

13:45 – 14:45 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Sophie Dieberger)
13:45 Uhr
Lisa Horstmann (Heidelberg): Der »Welsche Gast« von Thomasin von
Zerclaere. Veränderung der Bild-Text-Relation in 300 Jahren
Überlieferungsgeschichte
14:05 Uhr Diskussion
14:15 Uhr
Maximilian Wick (München): Die Leidener Wigalois-Handschrift – Ausdruck
einer subversiven Theologie?
14:35 Uhr Diskussion

14:50 – 15:10 Uhr: Pause

15:10 – 16:10 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Silvia Hufnagel)
15:10 Uhr
Stefanie Krinninger (Göttingen): „Het ich nu kunsten spyse / in mir,
daz ich […] / in ditz buch […] / Ein rede kunde getichten …“. Zum
Kunstbegriff des späten Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit
15:30 Uhr Diskussion
15:40 Uhr
Dennis Wegener (Wien): Das handschriftlich nachgetragene 117. Kapitel
des Theuerdank-Drucks Rar. 325a der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek München
16:00 Uhr Diskussion

16:10 – 16:30 Uhr: Pause

16:30 – 17:30 Uhr: Vorträge (Moderation: Andrea Riedl)
16:30 Uhr
Justyna Kuczyńska (Krakau): The Franciscan Breviary (Ms. Czart. 1211)
in the Library of Princes Czartoryski in Kraków as a Masterpiece of the
Neapolitan Illumination Art under the Aragonese Dynasty
16:50 Uhr Diskussion
17:00 Uhr
Christina Weiler (Wien): Die Meditationes vitae Christi –
Franziskanische Devotionshandschriften des Trecento
17:20 Uhr Diskussion

17:20 – 18:00 Uhr: Abschlussdiskussion

TODAY: Leeds IMC, Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland, Session 703

The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland will be running its first conference session this year at the Leeds International Medieval Congress.

Session 703 – Tuesday 4 July 2017 – 14.15 to 15.45

The following papers will be delivered:

Ron Baxter (Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture and the Medieval Workshop (paper 703-a);

James King (The Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland, London) – The Romanesque Sculpture of Dunfermline Abbey and Its Influence: Evidence and Some Questions (paper 703-b);

Agata Gomółka (Department of Art History & World Art Studies, University of East Anglia) – Carving Romanesque Bodies (paper 703-a).

Abtstract

Romanesque art and architecture was transnational in a European context.
The architectural sculpture produced in the British Isles and Ireland during the late
11th and 12th centuries demonstrates the visceral connection between these off-
shore islands and mainland Europe at that time. In its inaugural session at the IMC,
the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain & Ireland (CRSBI) is seen to reveal
some of the ways in which its searchable and fully illustrated database enables art
historians to build an understanding of Romanesque stone carving by identifying
authorship, tracing the diffusion of carved ornament, recreating workshop practice,
and reimagining aesthetic criteria. Launched in 1987 by Professor George Zarnecki
with British Academy support and now affiliated also to King’s College London, the
CRSBI is an Open Access website comprising illustrated records of the Romanesque
sculpture at some five thousand sites in Britain and Ireland.

Conf: IV Forum for the Art of the Middle Ages, Berlin & Brandenburg, 20-23rd Sep 2017

Berlin, Brandenburg an der Havel, 20. – 23.09.2017

IV. FORUM KUNST DES MITTELALTERS
BERLIN UND BRANDENBURG
360° – VERORTUNG, ENTGRENZUNG, GLOBALISIERUNG
20.–23. SEPTEMBER 2017

veranstaltet vom
Deutschen Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V.
mit der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, der Freien Universität Berlin
und dem Leibniz-Institut für Geschichte und Kultur des östlichen Europa

Das vierte Forum Kunst des Mittelalters widmet sich schwerpunktmäßig
Themenbereichen, die an den geographischen und methodischen Grenzen
klassischer Mittelalterforschung angesiedelt sind. Ausgangspunkt sind
die Veranstaltungsorte Berlin und Brandenburg an der Havel, wo
einerseits lokale mediävistische Themen zu verhandeln, andererseits
reiche Sammlungsbestände zu byzantinischer und vorderasiatischer Kunst
vorhanden sind. Entsprechend geht es um die Interaktion
zentraleuropäischer Kunst des Mittelalters mit künstlerischer
Produktion in anderen Regionen: von Osteuropa über den byzantinischen
Bereich, den Vorderen Orient, die Kaukasusregion und den Mittelmeerraum
bis hin zu den britischen Inseln und dem Ostseeraum einschließlich
Skandinaviens. Damit werden auch Forschungsbereiche wie die
Byzantinistik oder die Islamische Kunstgeschichte in den Fokus des
mediävistischen Bewusstseins gerückt, gerade vor dem Hintergrund der
massiven Gefährdungen künstlerischer und architektonischer Denkmäler im
Vorderen Orient. Thematisiert sind etwa Phänomene wie Migration,
Medientransformation und kulturelle Paradigmenwechsel. Indem wir nach
kulturell prägenden Regionen an den Grenzen „Europas“ und nach
transkulturellen Kontaktzonen fragen, werden auch Definitionen von
Mittelalter zur Debatte gestellt. – Als Pendant zu diesem Rundblick
präsentiert sich auch die Forschung zur Region Brandenburg/Berlin. Dazu
gehören ebenfalls Themen der museologischen und kunstwissenschaftlichen
Geschichte Berlins, wo die Erschließung von Zonen kulturellen
Austauschs eine lange Tradition hat.

MITTWOCH, 20. SEPTEMBER 2017
HUMBOLDT-UNIVERSITÄT ZU BERLIN (HU)

CfP: New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture, Leeds, 16-17 Mar 2018

Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, March 16 – 17, 2018
Deadline: Sep 30, 2017

New Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture

Focusing on the materiality of medieval sculpture has proven crucial to
its study and has expanded our historical understanding of sculpture
itself. Whether monumental relief sculpture in stone, wooden sculptures
in the round, sculpted altarpieces, ivory plaques or enamelled
reliquaries, the possibilities for research on medieval sculpture now
extend far beyond the established canon.

Contemporary medieval sculpture studies have opened the field to
comparative and inclusive research that embraces the social,
performative, gendered and ritual uses of medieval sculpture. These
developments have inspired the organisers of the conference New
Directions in the Study of Medieval Sculpture to reflect on the field
and ask how do we investigate medieval sculpture today and what might
come ‘after’ materiality?

This two-day conference seeks to assess and critique the state of the
field on medieval sculpture and to investigate new directions,
approaches and technologies for research. A consideration of the state
of the field could be approached through, but is not limited to, the
following topics:

    Processes and techniques of medieval sculpture
    The sensory experience of medieval sculpture
    The ephemeral and intangible aspects of medieval sculpture
    Medieval sculpture, photography and digital reproduction
    Archives, casts and reconstructing medieval sculpture
    Sculpture and medievalism
    Historiography of medieval sculpture studies
    Exhibition histories of medieval sculpture

This conference is hosted by the Henry Moore Institute, a centre for
the study of sculpture, and is convened by Dr Elisa Foster, 2016-18
Henry Moore Foundation Post-doctoral Fellow.

Accommodation and reasonable travel expenses within the UK will be
reimbursed.

Paper proposals should be sent via email to Dr Elisa Foster:
elisa.foster@henry-moore.org by 30 September 2017.