Tag Archives: ICMA

CFP: ICMA sponsored session: ‘MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit,’ Leeds International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1–4 July 2019

1024px-vase_de_cristal_d27alic3a9norDeadline: 21 September 2018

MOVING MATERIALS: Medium, Meanings, and Technique in Transit, Leeds International Medieval Congress (thematic strand: Materialities), University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 1-4 July 2019

Sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee
Organized by D. Esther Kim (Toronto),  Maggie Crosland (Courtauld), and Xin Yue (Sylvia) Wang (Toronto)

The materials of the medieval artist, artisan, and architect were constantly on the move, travelling from one part of the globe to another through trade, gifting, looting, or theft. Likewise, the localized techniques of working with materials and media could travel near and far, through the movement of artists and objects, as well as written and visual descriptions such as artist manuals and travel guides.

While on the move, travelling materials such as stone and marble, metals, fur, textiles, coral, ivory, and pigment—and techniques of working with these materials—might retain their original meanings and function; or they could be integrated with local media, refined, or even significantly transformed to something drastically different, to suit the ideologies and ambitions of their destination.

This panel aims to engage with materials and techniques in transit, as well as the (trans)regionality of their meanings and significations, by asking: are we still able to trace the ‘origin’ and ‘originality’ of certain materials, techniques, and their meanings? How then would the fluidity and transformation of techniques affect our understanding when we are trying to ascribe a certain technique to a particular culture or region? How are old, new, and combined meanings assessed and understood in the Middle Ages and in scholarship today?

Possible topics of discussion include, but are not limited to: global movements and dissemination of artists and/or their materials and techniques; modes of transmission; regional/transregional meaning and significance of materials and techniques; reuse and repurposing of existing materials and/or artworks; reasons for shifts in meaning and function of materials within and outside particular regions; the integration of materials and medium, and intermediality; trans-temporal/ trans-regional use of spolia, among others.

How to apply: We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from graduate student ICMA members, and encourage interdisciplinary submissions from students researching all parts of the globe from c.400-c.1500. To propose a paper, please send a title, abstract of up to 250 words, and CV to the organizers (de.kim@mail.utoronto.ca, margaret.crosland@courtauld.ac.uk, xw388@nyu.edu) by 21 September, 2018.

The International Center for Medieval Art Student Committee involves and advocates for all members of the ICMA with student status and facilitates communication and mentorship between student and non-student members.

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10 Must-See Temporary Exhibitions this Summer

The end of term is in sight and the days are getting longer. And that means we’re all daydreaming of summer. Whether your summer plans call for research or relaxation, take advantage of some stellar temporary exhibitions happening around the globe that are highlighting the production, context, and craftsmanship of medieval art. These exhibitions are pushing boundaries, considering new contexts, and boasting bold feats—several of these exhibitions present artworks on view in North America and Europe for the first time. Let us know your favourites by sharing your thoughts in the comments below. Happy Summer!

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Grant: ICMA Student Committee conference grant (due 1 February)

26231252_10210523721265685_5643383303839642598_nThe ICMA is pleased to offer grants for graduate students to present their research at conferences. Two awards will be made this year, at $600 each, to help defray the cost of travel. Applicants must be ICMA members and currently enrolled in a graduate program. These funds are available only to students delivering papers.

Applicants must submit:
1) A abstract of the paper that will be delivered in 300 words or less.
2) A short statement outlining the importance of the conference for academic or professional development
3) A budget proposal

Applications are due by 1 February 2018. Please submit materials as PDF attachments to Ryan Frisinger at awards@medievalart.org.

ICMA Student Committee seeks new members

Woman_teaching_geometryThe International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee is currently seeking new members for two-year (renewable) terms. We welcome applications from current graduate students (MA, MPhil, PhD) who anticipate being in higher education for at least two more years. The Student Committee has a diverse portfolio that includes organizing panels at international conferences (Leeds and Kalamazoo), contributing to the ICMA Newsletter, promoting opportunities for students in our field, and creating fora for students in medieval art to meet colleagues, and share research (in person, through social media, and in print), and actively participate in the ICMA. Potential future initiatives include an oral history project, establishing a mentorship program, and creating a network and lists of resources for medieval art history students researching abroad.

Potential members should submit the following to meg.bernstein@gmail.com and asears@berkeley.edu for consideration by February 15: current c.v., and a cover letter detailing interest in participating, relevant experience, current and future initiatives of interest. Applicants are welcome (but not required to) include ideas for future ICMA SC activities.

CFP: Regionalism in Medieval Art and Architecture (ICMA Student Committee Session), International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 10-13 May, 2018

800px-arte_islamica2c_ippogrifo2c_xi_sec_01CFP: Regionalism in Medieval Art and Architecture, International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 10-13 May, 2018.
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art (ICMA) Student Committee
Organized by Mark H. Summers (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Andrew Sears (University of California, Berkeley/University of Bern)

In 2001, Eva Hoffman introduced the concept of portability, suggesting a style that transcended traditional geographic, cultural, and religious boundaries. Since then, studies of traveling objects, trade networks, and pluralistic communities have created a veritable new field of the “Global Middle Ages,” which has helped us to better understand the interconnected medieval past as well as its role in shaping our sense of place today.

Our panel seeks to consider how local identity was shaped by such global networks. Potential questions include: Are artistic or architectural styles connected to specific places for specific reasons? Were medieval artists conscious about their own regional styles and the social, political, and religious impact they had? How was art positioned to both create communities and delineate boundaries? What about the rise of the “International Gothic” towards the end of the Middle Ages? Our concerns are also temporal, such as how the use of historicizing motifs and spolia helped medieval artists to communicate something about the here and now.

We welcome submissions for 20-minute papers from graduate student ICMA members. To propose a paper, please send a title, abstract of 300 words, CV, and completed Congress Information form to Mark H. Summers (mhsummers@wisc.edu) and Andrew Sears (asears@berkeley.edu) by 10 September 2017.

The Student Committee of the International Center for Medieval Art involves and advocates for all members of the ICMA with student status and facilitates communication and mentorship between student and non-student members.

CFP: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean

CfP ICMA Kalamazoo 2018 Moving People Shifting FrontiersCall for Papers: Moving People, Shifting Frontiers: Re-contextualising the Thirteenth Century in the Wider Mediterranean, International Congress of Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13 2018
Deadline: 10 September 2017

Organizers: Katerina Ragkou (University of Cologne) and Maria Alessia Rossi (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Every day we witness people moving, with them objects and skills, knowledge and experience; either forcibly or willingly; for work or for pleasure. The communities living along the shores of the Mediterranean and the hinterlands of the Balkans during the thirteenth century share many of the characteristics of our contemporary world: military campaigns and religious wars; the intensification of pilgrimage and the relocation of refugees; the shifting of frontiers and the transformation of socio-political orders.

The transformations of the thirteenth century span from east to west, from northern Europe to the Byzantine Empire and from the Balkans to the Levant. The geographic breadth is paralleled by crucial events including the fourth crusade, the fall of Acre, the empowerment of the Serbian Kingdom and the Republic of Venice, the loss and following restoration of the Byzantine Empire, and the creation of new political entities, such as the Kingdom of Naples and that of Cyprus, the Empire of Trebizond, and the Principality of Achaia. Eclectic scholarly tradition has either focused geographically or thematically, losing sight of the pan-Mediterranean perspective. These societies had multifaceted interactions, and comprised a variety of scales, from the small world of regional and inter-regional communities to the broader Mediterranean dynamics.

This session aims to address questions such as which are the various processes through which military campaigns and religious wars affected the urban landscape of these regions and their material production? Is there a difference in economic and artistic trends between “town” and “countryside” in the thirteenth-century wider Mediterranean? What observations can we make in regards to trade, diplomatic missions, artistic interaction and exchange of the regional, interregional and international contacts? How did these shape and transform cultural identities? How did different social, political and religious groups interact with each other?

This session welcomes papers focused on, but not limited to: the role played by economic activity and political power in thirteenth-century artistic production and the shaping of local and interregional identities; the production and consumption of artifacts and their meaning; the transformation of urban and rural landscapes; religious and domestic architecture and the relationship between the private and public use of space.

Proposals for 20 min papers should include an abstract (max.250 words) and brief CV. Proposals should be submitted by 10 September 2017 to the session organizers: Katerina Ragkou (katerina.ragkou@gmail.com) and Maria Alessia Rossi (m.alessiarossi@icloud.com).

Thanks to a generous grant from the Kress Foundation, funds may be available to defray travel costs of speakers in ICMA-sponsored sessions up to a maximum of $600 ($1200 for transatlantic travel). If available, the Kress funds are allocated for travel and hotel only. Speakers in ICMA sponsored sessions will be refunded only after the conference, against travel receipts.

Event: ICMA Study Days in New York and Baltimore

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Date: Sunday 20 November 2016 – Tuesday 22 November 2016

In collaboration with Gerhard Lutz and Forum Medieval Art from Germany, the ICMA is co-sponsoring study days in New York and Baltimore in connection with these two exhibitions:

Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven
New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art

A Sense of Beauty: Medieval Art and the Five Senses
Baltimore: The Walters Art Museum

Each visit will consist of a guided tour to the exhibition with the curator(s) highlighting questions of concept and presentation, and particular objects. The second part will be a tour among ourselves with collaborative discussion of specific highlighted objects and questions.

We expect a great demand for this; only a maximum number of 35 participants can be accommodated.  Although a participation in only one of the two days will be possible, preference will be given to those who would like to attend on both days.

Please see below for the full program. All expenses are to be covered by the individual participant.

To register, please email Ryan Frisinger at icma@medievalart.org with “Study Day Medieval Art” in the subject line and wait for confirmation

THE PROGRAM
SUNDAY November 20 (evening):
New York City
informal dinner

MONDAY November 21
9.30 a.m. – ca. 4:00 p.m.
Jerusalem 1000 – 1400
New York: Metropolitan Museum (main building)

Travel to Baltimore
ca. 8:00 p.m.
Baltimore
informal dinner

TUESDAY November 22
ca. 9:00 a.m. – ca. 4:00 p.m.
Five Senses – Baltimore: Walter Art Museum